(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Vermilion County, Illinois"

UNIVERSITY OF 
ILLINOIS LIBRARY 

ff URBana champaign 







Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/historyofvermili02will 



HISTORY 
of 

VERMILION COUNTY 

ILLINOIS 



BY 
JACK MOORE WILLIAMS 



IN TWO VOLUMES 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME TWO 



HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 
TOPEKA— INDIANAPOLIS 
1930 



vu ktiL 

l/> 2. 



J • e*-. 







©fffl& 



History of Vermilion County 



C. V. McClenathan is prominent in business and finan- 
cial circles in Danville, where he is president of the Sec- 
ond National Bank. He was born on a farm near Catlin, 
Illinois, October 3, 1864, the son of George S. and Sarah 
(Remley) McClenathan. 

Both George S. McClenathan and his wife were natives 
of Pennsylvania. About 1854 they came to Illinois and 
settled in Vermilion County. The McClenathan family is 
of Scotch lineage and of Quaker belief. The great-grand- 
father of C. V. McClenathan was a native of the land of 
hills and heather and at an early period in the settlement 
of Pennsylvania he crossed the Atlantic in one of the old 
time sailing vessels, taking up his abode near Philadelphia. 
The Remley family is of English descent and dates its 
origin in America to the time of William Penn. The ma- 
ternal grandmother of C. V. McClenathan bore the maiden 
name of Margaret Penn and was a relative of the cele- 
brated family to which the renowned philanthropist and 
pioneer, William Penn, belonged. On removing to Illinois, 
George S. McClenathan settled in Catlin Township, where 
he purchased land and engaged in farming, being one of 
the most successful agriculturists of his community, and 
also serving acceptably as a township official. Eventually 
he removed to the village of Fairmount where both he 
and his wife lived retired. He died in October, 1896, and 
she died April 22, 1900. Both are buried in Oakridge 
Cemetery, near Catlin. 

545 
1— Vol. 2 



546 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

C. V. McClenathan was reared on the home farm, ob- 
tained his early education in the country schools, and re- 
mained at home until he attained his majority. He then 
went to Wichita, Kansas, where he remained eight years. 
He entered the Kansas National Bank, in the mortgage and 
loan department, and afterwards was placed in charge of 
the loan business of that institution. He returned to 
Danville in 1893 and became cashier of the State Bank, 
which was incorporated in 1901 as the Danville National 
Bank. In 1920 he was made vice president of the Second 
National Bank and five years later was elected president of 
that institution. As a financier Mr. McClenathan stands 
high in public esteem. He is also a director of the First 
National Bank of Homer, 111., director and treasurer of the 
Equitable Building and Loan Association, of Danville, and 
also a director of the Vermilion Abstract Company, trus- 
tee Danville Country Club, and treasurer of the Musebeck 
Show Company. 

In 1905 Mr. McClenathan was married at Louisville, 
Kentucky, to Alice Weston Mcintosh, the daughter of 
Thomas Mcintosh, a native of Will County, and a prom- 
inent merchant of Danville. 

Mr. McClenathan was elected to the Illinois State Leg- 
islature in 1900 and reelected to that office in 1902. Dur- 
ing his incumbency he was made chairman of a new com- 
mittee that had just been created being the only Democratic 
chairman in the legislature. This was a joint committee 
on penal and reformatory institutions and labor and in- 
dustrial affairs. As chairman of the same he introduced 
and passed the anti-convict labor bill, and also drew a bill 
to strike off the employes who were not in actual service 
in the house and senate, but it never came to vote. 

During the World War Mr. McClenathan rendered pa- 
triotic service to the government in connection with vari- 
ous drives and campaigns. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 547 

Mr. McClenathan is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church'; Olive Branch Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; Modern Woodmen of 
America; and Danville Commercial Club. He is a trustee 
of the Lake View Hospital Association. He has various 
other interests in Danville besides those mentioned. A 
contemporary biographer has said of him : "His friends are 
legion, as his genial courtesy and kindly bearing are cal- 
culated to win confidence, which his sterling integrity and 
unquestioned candor serve to maintain." 



John A. Cathcart, president of the Palmer National 
Bank, of Danville, has had many years of experience in 
banking. He was born at Mason City, Illinois, March 31, 
1876, the son of John M. and Sarah J. (Alexander) 
Cathcart. 

John M. Cathcart was born at Cookstown, County 
Tyrone, Ireland, and his wife was a native of Belfast. 
Their marriage took place at Lincoln, Illinois, where Mr. 
Cathcart engaged in the grain business for many years. 
He was a highly esteemed and well-known citizen of that 
section. He died in 1907 and his wife died in 1917. They 
are buried at Indianola, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Cathcart 
three children were born: Florence and William G., both 
deceased; and John A., the subject of this sketch. 

John A. Cathcart acquired his early education in the 
grammar and high schools of Mason City and Sidell, Illi- 
nois. After leaving school he became interested in the 
grain and lumber business with his father. In 1898 he 
became associated with Lyons, Alexander & Company 
Bank of Sidell, as bookkeeper. He has since been con- 
nected with that institution, which is now known as the 
First National Bank, and he is vice president. He was also 



548 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

elected president of the Palmer National Bank of Dan- 
ville, January 1, 1929. 

Mr. Cathcart married in 1899 Miss Mabel Wright, of 
Sidell, Illinois, the daughter of Silas and Nancy (Driscoll) 
Wright, both deceased. They have a daughter, Josephine. 
She is a graduate of Sidell High School and attended 
Columbia University. 

Mr. Cathcart is a Republican, a member of Sidell Lodge 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons No. 798, past master; 
Homer Chapter Royal Arch Masons; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Medinah Temple; Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks; and Danville Country Club. He 
holds membership in the First Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Sidell, and is a trustee of Lake View Hospital. 



George F. Rearick. — One of the representative profes- 
sional men of Vermilion County is George F. Rearick, a 
leading member of the Danville bar. He is a native of 
Beardstown, Illinois, born March 31, 1863, the son of Jacob 
W. and Elizabeth (Kuhl) Rearick. 

Jacob W. Rearick, deceased, was a native of Germany. 
He was an early settler of Cass County, Illinois, and served 
as county judge. He was a hardware merchant for many 
years. Mr. Rearick is buried at South Mound, Kansas, and 
his wife, who died in 1863, is buried at Beardstown, Illi- 
nois. To Mr. and Mrs. Rearick the following children were 
born: Elsie R. McFarland, lives at Cimarron, Kansas; 
Lydia S. Rearick, lives at Chicago, Illinois; Susan Geisen- 
heimer, lives at Chicago, Illinois; Elizabeth Beeley, lives at 
Princeton, Illinois; and George F., the subject of this 
sketch. 

George F. Rearick first attended the public schools of 
Beardstown and following his graduation from Beards- 
town High School he entered Ohio Wesleyan University. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 549 

In 1885 he read law with William J. Calhoun and was 
admitted to the bar in 1888. Since that time Mr. Rearick 
has practiced his profession at Danville. He has offices 
in the First National Bank Building. 

On September 27, 1893, Mr. Rearick was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Grace Haggard, of Danville, the daughter 
of Byron and Charlotte (Creamer) Haggard, natives of 
Ohio, both now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Rearick were 
born five children: Walter R., insurance, lives at Hart- 
ford, Connecticut; Elizabeth C, teacher of physical educa- 
tion, Jacksonville, Illinois; Francis G., lawyer, lives at Chi- 
cago, Illinois ; Edward C, electrical engineer, lives at Cran- 
ford, New Jersey; and Harold H., attends Beloit College. 

Mr. Rearick is a Republican. He has served as super- 
visor, city attorney, and as mayor of Danville. He is a 
member of St. James Methodist Episcopal Church, and is 
identified with the Vermilion County Bar Association, Illi- 
nois Bar Association, and American Bar Association. 



George W. Telling. — One of the substantial business 
men and leading citizens of Danville is George W. Telling, 
who is president of the Commercial Trust & Savings Bank. 
He was born at Springfield, Illinois, July 6, 1871, the son 
of Edward T. and Sarah F. (Taylor) Telling. 

Edward T. Telling was a native of England. About 
1860 he came to the United States and settled in Morgan 
County, Illinois, where he became successful as a farmer. 
He died June 28, 1908. His wife was born in Jacksonville, 
Illinois, and now resides in Danville. 

George W. Telling attended the grade schools of Cham- 
paign County and later the high school at Danville. He 
also took a commercial course of study at the Gem City 
Business College at Quincy, Illinois. Mr. Telling entered 
the field of banking with the firm of Lyons, Alexander & 



550 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Company, at Sidell, Illinois, in the capacity of assistant 
cashier. After three years he became cashier of the First 
State Bank of Broadlands, in Champaign County. Mr. 
Telling served in that capacity for eleven years and in 
1906 came to Danville as cashier of the Commercial Trust 
& Savings Bank. He was elected president of the institu- 
tion in 1911. Besides his financial activities he is an ex- 
tensive land owner and is also a director of the Webster 
Wholesale Grocery Company of Danville. 

In 1898 Mr. Telling married Miss Anna Lyons, the 
daughter of William Lyons, who was a prominent banker 
of Danville. Their son, Gordon R. Telling, is assistant 
cashier of the Commercial Trust & Savings Bank. 

Politically Mr. Telling is a Republican. The cause of 
education has always found in him a stalwart champion, 
and for four years he rendered active service as president 
of the Danville School Board. He manifests a keen and 
enthusiastic interest in every civic project looking toward 
community welfare. During the period of the World war 
Mr. Telling served as county chairman for the United 
States certificates of indebtedness and sent his county 
"over the top" on each drive. He was also chairman of 
the Boys' Working Reserves for Vermilion County during 
the war. 

Mr. Telling is treasurer of the Danville Chamber of 
Commerce and belongs to the Danville Country Club; 
Further Light Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, past 
master; Danville Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, thirty-second degree, treasurer; Ansar Temple, and 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks No. 332. He 
holds membership in the St. James Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

Mr. Telling is characterized as a careful, conservative 
financier, whose success is attributable to his unfailing 
good nature and kindly consideration of others. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 551 

Al W. Heskett. — Prominent in business and civic affairs, 
Al W. Heskett, secretary of the Fidelity Building Associa- 
tion of Danville, is a native of Indiana. He was born at 
Roachdale, August 6, 1898, the son of Dr. Wilbur C. and 
Katherine E. (Wells) Heskett. 

Dr. Wilbur C. Heskett, deceased, was a physician and 
surgeon of Indiana. He was born at Hamilton, Ohio, and 
was a graduate of the Kentucky School of Medicine, as 
well as the Chicago Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat College. 
He practiced his profession at Roachdale for over twenty 
years and later settled at Indianapolis, where he was 
engaged in practice at the time of his death in 1926. He 
is buried at Roachdale. His widow lives at Nashville, 
Tennessee. Doctor Heskett was a Republican, a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, Masonic Lodge, thirty-second 
degree, and was identified with the Indiana Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association. There were two 
sons born to Dr. and Mrs. Heskett: R. C, who lives at 
Indianapolis, Indiana; and Al W., the subject of this sketch. 

Al W. Heskett attended the public schools of Indianapo- 
lis and was graduated in 1916 from Manual Training High 
School in that city. He received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from DePauw University in 1922 and then came 
to Danville, where he became associated with John W. 
Webster in the insurance business. In 1924 he was made 
a partner and the firm became known as the Webster- 
Heskett Insurance Agency. At the death of Mr. Webster 
in 1928, Mr. Heskett became secretary of the Fidelity 
Building Association. At that time he also purchased the 
insurance business, which he still conducts. 

On September 29, 1925, Mr. Heskett was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Elizabeth Webster, the daughter of John 
W. and Esther (Baum) Webster, of Danville. Mr. Web- 
ster was born at Springfield, Illinois, and was graduated 
from Danville High School, DePauw University, and the 
Harvard School of Law. He engaged in the practice of 



552 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

law at Danville for several years and then became inter- 
ested in the Fidelity Investment Building Association and 
the insurance business. At the time of his death, May 6, 
1928, he was secretary of the Fidelity Building Association 
of Danville. Mr. Webster was a member of Saint James 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Elks Club, and Phi Kappa 
Psi fraternity. He was president of the board of trustees 
of Lakeview Hospital, and a member of the Salvation 
Army Board and the Illinois State Board of the Anti- 
Saloon League. Mr. Webster was married April 15, 1900, 
to Esther Baum, who survives him. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Heskett a daughter was born, Esther Webster Heskett, 
born February 18, 1927. 

Politically, Mr. Heskett is a Republican. He belongs to 
the Elks Club, Kiwanis Club, Danville Country Club, Union 
League Club of Chicago, and Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. 



Michael E. King. — One of the most influential figures in 
banking circles of Vermilion County for many years was 
Michael E. King, who served as president of the Second 
National Bank of Danville from 1902 until the time of his 
death, March 16, 1929. Mr. King was born at Dubuque, 
Iowa, September 24, 1857, the son of Austin and Ellen 
(Maley) King. 

Austin King was born in County Clare, Ireland, Sep- 
tember 7, 1822, and his wife was a native of Milltown, Mal- 
bay, County Clare, Ireland. Both are deceased and are 
buried at Danville. Nine children were born to this union, 
all of whom were reared in Danville. 

The boyhood of Michael E. King was spent at Dubuque, 
Iowa, and in Danville. When ten years of age he was a 
mule driver in the coal mines of this section. He began his 
business career as a retail grocer and later became the suc- 
cessful owner of a large wholesale grocery business. Mr. 




7J££</GL 



T 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTS 553 

King was identified with banking interests of Vermilion 
County for many years and served as president of the Sec- 
ond National Bank of Danville, as stated above, from 1902 
until his death. He was also chairman of the Board of 
Directors. 

In June, 1887, Mr. King was united in marriage with 
Miss Catherine Cavanaugh, of Danville, the daughter of 
Frank and Ella (McLean) Cavanaugh. Their children 
were: Earl Francis, who is deceased; and Austin W., a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this history. Cath- 
erine (Cavanaugh) King died January 25, 1904, and is 
buried in Danville. 

Politically, Mr. King was a Republican. He was a de- 
vout member of the Catholic Church, and held membership 
in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
Knights of Columbus. 



Austin W. King is one of the representative young- 
business men of Danville, where he is identified with the 
Second National Bank. He was born in this city, June 
20, 1890, the son of Michael E. and Catherine (Cava- 
naugh) King. 

A complete sketch of Michael E. King appears else- 
where in this history. 

The boyhood of Austin W. King was spent in Dan- 
ville, where he received his early education. He later at- 
tended Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and subse- 
quently attended the University of Pennsylvania. He be- 
gan his banking career in Danville as a clerk in the Second 
National Bank and is now one of the directors. 

During the World War Mr. King served as a noncom- 
missioned officer. 

Mr. King holds membership in the Catholic Church, 
Danville. 



554 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

George F. Edmund ranks high among the successful 
young business men of Danville, where he is identified 
with the firm of Edmund & Dickson, morticians, 440 North 
Vermilion Street. He was born at Woodhull, Henry Coun- 
ty, Illinois, May 22, 1891, the son of Andrew J. and Mar- 
garet (Peterson) Edmund. 

Andrew J. Edmund was born at Schmolon, Sweden, 
in 1831. He came to this country about 1866 and settled 
in Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade as a car- 
penter. About 1870 he located in Henry County, Illinois, 
where he purchased sixty acres of land. He became the 
owner of two hundred and twenty-seven acres of fine land 
and became a successful farmer. He also owned real 
estate at Woodhull, Illinois. Mr. Edmund was a Repub- 
lican and a member of the Swedish Lutheran Church. He 
died in 1918 and his wife, born in Sweden in 1850, died in 
1907. Both are buried at Woodhull, Illinois. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Edmund were born seven children, as follows: Emma, 
married Melcher Stevens, lives at Andover, Illinois; Hilda, 
married Oscar Hagg, lives at Cambridge, Illinois; Selma, 
married Perry Westerland, lives at Orion, Illinois; Ida, 
married Emil Peterson, lives at Woodhull, Illinois; Anna, 
died in 1906; John W., lives on the old homestead; and 
George F., the subject of this sketch. 

George F. Edmund attended the public schools of 
Henry County and Brown's Business College, Rock Island, 
Illinois. He was employed in a general store at Woodhull 
and in 1910 went to Rock Island, where he was associated 
with Gustofson & Hayes, as a salesman. The following 
year he returned to Woodhull and in 1912 purchased a 
furniture and undertaking business at that place, which 
was known as the Edmund Furniture Company. He was 
graduated from the Worsham School of Embalming, 
Chicago, in 1912 and became a registered operator in 
January, 1913. Two years later he removed to Orion, Illi- 
nois, where he established an undertaking business. In 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 555 

1919 he built a thirty-thousand-dollar funeral home and 
furniture house, which he disposed of in 1924 to Peterson 
& Wallen Company. In 1924 he came to Danville and pur- 
chased the J. W. Turner Company, Incorporated, and later 
Mr. Turner purchased a third interest in the business. 
Mr. Dickson also became a member of the firm finally, 
having taken over the interests of Mr. Turner. In 1924 
the J. W. Strauss residence was purchased, and is now 
used as a funeral home by Edmund & Dickson. They rank 
among the dependable funeral directors of the city and 
they have an extensive clientele. 

In 1913 Mr. Edmund married Miss May Rehnstrom, 
the daughter of Stephen and Caroline (Johnson) Rehn- 
strom, of Andover, Illinois. They have two sons, George 
and James. 

Mr. Edmund is a Republican, a member of Saint James 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and belongs to Olive Branch 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons No. 38; Dan- 
ville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Gao Grotto; Iris 
Chapter Order Eastern Star, Past Patron; Orion Country 
Club; Chamber of Commerce; and American Business 
Club, vice president and director. 



Hon. Walter C. Lindley, who has served as judge of 
the United States District Court for the Eastern District 
of Illinois since September 29, 1922, is a native of this state, 
graduating with honors from the Colleges of Liberal Arts 
and Law, University of Illinois, and in a career of twenty 
years as a member of the bar has fully justified the ex- 
pectations entertained of him while a university man. 
Judge Lindley was born on a farm in Big Spring Town- 
ship, Shelby County, Illinois, July 12, 1880. His paternal 
ancestors came from England and settled in New Jersey 
in Colonial times. Subsequently a branch of the family 



556 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

moved to North Carolina. They were affiliated with the 
Quaker Church, and Judge Lindley's grandfather, on com- 
ing north, first settled in the noted Quaker community of 
Wayne County, Indiana. The grandfather was Osmond 
Lindley, who was born at Guilford Court House, North 
Carolina, in 1837. As a young man he moved to Wayne 
County, Indiana. He married there and became a pork 
packer and farmer. In about 1866 he moved with his family 
to Shelby County, Illinois, and was a school teacher and 
farmer there until his death in 1879. His wife was Achsah 
Wilson, who was born at Guilford Court House, North 
Carolina, in 1839, and died at Fairmount, Indiana, in 1919. 

Alfred W. Lindley, father of Judge Lindley, was born 
at Dublin, in Wayne County, Indiana, September 7, 1856, 
and was about ten years of age when his parents moved 
to Shelby County, Illinois, where he was reared and fin- 
ished his education. The greater part of his active life has 
been spent as a farmer. He has been an important and 
successful figure in the agricultural life of Shelby and 
Cumberland Counties, and still owns a large amount of 
farm land in those counties. He also engaged in the bank- 
ing business and was president of the First National Bank 
of Chrisman, and of the Neoga National Bank. He is still 
a director in those institutions. His home was in Shelby 
County until 1895, when he removed to Neoga. Mr. Lind- 
ley is a Republican, and has served on the Board of Super- 
visors of Shelby County. He is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church, though originally a Quaker. He married 
Irene Carey, who was born in Grant County, Indiana, Sep- 
tember 7, 1858. Walter C. Lindley is the oldest of their 
children. Miss Jennie A. Lindley, at home with her par- 
ents, is a teacher of music. The two other children were 
Virgil, who died at the age of two years, and Vernon, who 
died when ten years old. 

Walter C. Lindley, during his youth, lived on a farm 
and in the town home of his parents at Neoga. He was 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 557 

educated in the public schools of Shelby County, graduated 
from Neoga High School in 1897, and from 1897 until 1901 
was a student in the College of Liberal Arts at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, taking his Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1901. From 1901 until 1904 he attended the College of 
Law, graduating in 1904. In 1910 the College of Law 
awarded him the degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence. From 
1901 until 1905 he was instructor of rhetoric in the Acad- 
emy of the University. While a student Judge Lindley 
became a member of Phi Gamma Delta social fraternity, 
Phi Beta Kappa honorary scholarship fraternity, Phi 
Delta Phi legal fraternity, and Theta Kappa Nu honorary 
legal fraternity. He also served as managing editor of the 
Daily Illini, was president of the Students' Republican 
Club, associate editor of the Illinois Magazine, chairman of 
the Senior Ball Committee, and chairman of the Cap and 
Gown Committee. He graduated at the head of his class 
from the Law School, and stood second in the entire gradu- 
ating class of the university, a class numbering two hun- 
dred forty-five. 

Admitted to the bar June 30, 1904, Mr. Lindley began 
practice at Danville, and until 1922 was a member of the 
firm of Lindley, Penwell & Lindley, handling a large gen- 
eral practice in all the courts of Eastern Illinois. From 
1912 until 1918 he served as master in chancery of the 
United States Court, and from 1916 until 1920 was a mem- 
ber of the Board of County Commissioners of Vermilion 
County. The late President Harding appointed him judge 
of the United States District Court on September 29, 1922. 
His Eastern District comprises forty-five counties, extend- 
ing from Kankakee County on the north to Alexander 
County, including the City of Cairo, on the south, and St. 
Clair County on the west. 

Judge Lindley married April 30, 1913, at North Egre- 
mont, Massachusetts, Miss Louise Dewey Brown, daughter 
of Charles F. and Carrie (Dewey) Brown, both now de- 



558 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ceased. Her father was a prominent bridge contractor, 
for many years having headquarters at Chicago, Illinois. 
He helped to build the bridge at Thebes, Illinois, and many 
others in the United States, including the bridge across 
the Mississippi River at Memphis, Tennessee. 

Judge and Mrs. Lindley have three children: Mary 
Aletta, Louise Dewey, and Walter C, Jr. 

Judge Lindley is a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and is affiliated with Olive Branch Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons No. 38; Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; Medinah Temple, Chicago; Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks No. 332; White Oaks Lodge No. 469, 
Knights of Pythias. He has served as a director of the 
Chamber of Commerce and Kiwanis Club, president of the 
Danville Country Club and the Vermilion County Bar As- 
sociation. He is a member of the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation and American Bar Association. He is also a mem- 
ber of the College Club of Danville, the Union League Club 
of Chicago, and the Hamilton Club of Chicago. 

Judge Lindley was a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion of Danville for three years and during this time the 
new million-dollar high school was built. During the World 
war he made more than two hundred speeches as a "four- 
minute speaker" in behalf of the Liberty Loan and Red 
Cross drives, and was a member of the Legal Advisory 
Board of Vermilion County. 



William J. Parrett. — One of the most influential figures 
in newspaper circles in Vermilion County is William J. 
Parrett, who is identified with the "Commercial-News" of 
Danville. He was born at Ottawa, Illinois, in 1873, the son 
of John and Emily (DeBolt) Parrett. 

John Parrett was born at Newark, Ohio. Throughout 
his life he engaged in general farming and met with sue- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 559 

cess. He is now deceased. His widow lives at Ottawa, 
Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Parrett were born three chil- 
dren: Mrs. Thomas Reid, lives at Springfield, Illinois; 
Mrs. Edward Zelm, lives at Streator, Illinois; and William 
J., the subject of this sketch. 

William J. Parrett began his newspaper career at 
Fonda, Iowa, and before locating at Danville worked as a 
reporter on newspapers in Sioux City, Iowa, and Des 
Moines, Iowa. He was connected with newspaper in Chi- 
cago in 1893; was manager of the Ottawa Journal in 1894- 
95; manager of the LaCrosse (Wisconsin) "Republican- 
Leader" in 1896; advertising manager of the Aurora (Illi- 
nois) "News" in 1898; and came to Danville in 1898, where 
he joined John H. Harrison, owner of the "Commercial- 
News," as business manager and co-partner. Mr. Parrett's 
ability as a newspaper executive has been demonstrated 
in the fact that after coming to the "Commercial-News" 
he increased the circulation from eight hundred to thirty 
thousand, giving it the largest circulation of any news- 
paper in the United States in a city the size of Danville. 

In 1904 Mr. Parrett married Miss Margaret Connor, of 
Danville, the daughter of John Connor. They have no 
children. 

Mr. Parrett is a Republican and for eleven years has 
been a member of the City Election Commission. He 
served during the World war as a "Dollar a Year" man 
with the United States Department of Labor, and was a 
member of the Wilson peace party, attending the Ver- 
sailles Peace Conference in 1919. He has also been city 
collector for six years. Mr. Parrett is identified with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Kiwanis Club, 
and is vice president and director of the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Mr. Parrett is the originator of "Dollar Day Sales," 
known to newspaper readers throughout America, and 
for this innovation in merchandising through the printed 



560 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

word has long enjoyed outstanding reputation. As first 
conceived, Mr. Parrett furnished plans for "Dollar Day" 
to two hundred twelve different newspapers in the United 
States for what is still believed to be a record for the sale 
of a single selling plan. 

The "Commercial-News" has always followed a 
straightforward, aggressive editorial policy for the im- 
provement and betterment of Danville, and through it and 
its exertions the influence of Mr. Parrett and Mr. Harri- 
son has been felt in many directions and brought many 
public improvements and much public good to Danville. 
However, Mr. Parrett has also personally sponsored many 
movements for public good and among these holds credit 
for the adoption of the Danville City Plan, and the estab- 
lishment of Danville's municipal golf course, the first 
municipal course to be provided by any city in the State 
of Illinois. He also personally sponsored and helped 
organize the Associated Charities in Danville, bringing to- 
gether the charitable work of the city into a systematic 
plan of work. 



John Higgins Harrison — The late John Higgins Harri- 
son was outstanding among the citizens of Danville both 
for his business ability and for his public spirited concern 
in the affairs of the community. He was born at Lebanon, 
Indiana, November 30, 1867, the son of Dr. Thomas H. and 
Minta (Higgins) Harrison. 

Dr. Thomas H. Harrison was born at Ladoga, Indiana, 
December 10, 1842. He was a graduate of Ohio State 
Medical College and for a time practiced his profession at 
Lebanon, Indiana. Later, he became interested in the 
newspaper business at Lebanon and subsequently went to 
Michigan City, Ind. He was editor, publisher, and owner 
of the Lebanon Pioneer and the Michigan City Dispatch. 
Doctor Harrison became president of the State Benevolent 




-S)^U~J^<f^^A^-^x^ 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 561 

Boards of Indiana. He died August 12, 1890, and is 
buried at Thorntown, Indiana. His wife, born at Thorn- 
town, Indiana, August 21, 1844, died October 25, 1925, and 
is buried at Danville. The only child born to Doctor and 
Mrs. Harrison was John Higgins, the subject of this sketch. 
John Higgins Harrison attended the grade schools of 
Lebanon, Indiana, and after his graduation in 1884 from 
Lebanon High School he entered DePauw University, from 
which he was graduated in 1891. At an early age he 
learned printing in his father's newspaper plants and in 
1888 went to Indianapolis, Indiana, as a reporter on the 
Indianapolis Sentinel. His newspaper career next took 
him to Chicago, where he was associated from 1891 until 

1894 with the Chicago Times and the Chicago Mail as re- 
porter, telegraph editor, and finally assistant editor. In 

1895 he became press agent for a large circus and two 
years later was press agent for a theatrical circuit. He 
came to Danville in 1897 for the Evening Commercial and 
at that time acquired a half interest in the paper and also 
became its business manager. 

The Commercial was established in 1866. The pres- 
ent Commercial-News is the result of a merger of the fol- 
lowing papers: Commercial, established in 1866; News, 
established in 1872, consolidated in 1903; Press, estab- 
lished in 1887; Democrat, established in 1897; consoli- 
dated in 1908; and merged with the Commercial-News in 
1927. Mr. Harrison was editor of the Commercial-News. 
He was also president of the Home Theatre Company. He 
was a trustee of Lakeview Hospital, DePauw University, 
and the Young Men's Christian Association. 

Mr. Harrison was married on June 23, 1928, to Lucille 
(Brian) Gilmore, of Chicago, the daughter of Alexis and 
Helen (Kelley) Brian. Mr. Brian is deceased and his 
widow lives in Chicago and Brownwood, Texas. 

In politics Mr. Harrison was identified with the Repub- 
lican party. He was chairman of the Board of Commis- 

2— Vol. 2 



562 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

sioners of Joliet Prison from 1905 until 1913 and during 
the World War was a member of the Illinois State Council 
of Defense. He held membership in St. James Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and had the following lodge affiliations: 
Olive Branch Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons No. 82; 
Danville Council, Royal and Select Master Masons No. 37; 
Athlestan Commandry, Knights Templar No. 45 ; Danville 
Consistory, thirty-second degree; and Medinah Temple of 
the Shrine. He also belonged to the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, No. 332. 

Mr. Harrison was a member of the Republican State 
Central Committee during 1914-16; chairman of the Re- 
publican State Convention in 1918; and a delegate to the 
Republican National Conventions of 1916 and 1928. 

John H. Harrison died at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon, 
March 2, 1930, at the St. Francis hospital in Miami Beach, 
Fla. Mr. Harrison was stricken with a paralytic stroke 
Nov. 1, 1929, while in St. Louis, Mo., on business. He was 
taken to the Missouri Baptist hospital where he recovered 
to the extent that on Dec. 21, he was taken to Miami Beach, 
Fla., where he remained until his death. 

Mrs. Harrison who was in Florida with her husband, 
returned to Danville with his remains. Funeral services 
were held at the Saint James Methodist Episcopal Church 
on March 6th and interment was made in Springhill Ceme- 
tery, Danville. 

Mr. Harrison's death was deeply felt and sincerely 
mourned by Danville and Vermilion County. Those closest 
to this great man felt his loss most keenly. Expressive of 
the great esteem in which he was held by his employes, the 
following tribute appeared in the issue of March 4, 1930 
of the Commercial-News, signed by the one hundred and 
one employes of that newspaper: 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 563 

"The chief is gone. 

And in his passing we have lost not only an employer, 
but a friend and adviser and a co-worker. 

The door of his office was always open to his friends and 
we who worked, not for him, but with him, were made to 
feel we were his friends. 

He always kindly listened to what we said. His keen, 
analytical mind readily grasped the problem presented, 
whether it concerned the business or our personal affairs. 

The solution may not always have pleased, but calm 
reflection would reveal its correctness. In time of trouble, 
there was always sympathy and solicitude. 

He asked for our best service and his was the type of 
employer that received our loyal support. The producer 
had no fear of censure from the chief. 

We knew him as an ardent partisan in politics, but 
never did political or other ulterior considerations ever 
enter into the matter of our service. 

We knew intimately his high ideals, his interests in 
community affairs, his love of Danville and never was 
there a question in the minds of we who served with him 
as to his sincerity in matters that concerned the public's 
welfare. 

We have lost our friend and counselor, but in this loss 
we are confronted with the knowledge that we are the bet- 
ter for having known and enjoyed to the fullness his 
friendship. 

We have lost the material contact we loved so well, but 
his memory will live on in our hearts and our tribute to 
his life will be our determination to do our part in carry- 
ing on the policies upon which he built The Commercial- 
News." 

Harrison Park, Danville. — Appreciation of the love of 
a mother who, through his long business career, was an 
adviser and friend, who devoted her life to his happiness 



564 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and welfare, prompted the gift to the city of Danville of 
Harrison Park by John H. Harrison, editor of the Com- 
mercial-News, and his wife, Mrs. Lucille Brian Harrison. 
Formal acceptance of the 233.47 acre tract was made by 
the city on November 13, 1928. Public announcement of 
the gift of the park was made by Mr. and Mrs. Harrison 
November 11, 1928. 

The only restrictions accompanying the deed of the 
land were that the real estate should be held in trust by 
the city of Danville for the benefit of the public and for- 
ever be used only as a park and for recreational purposes 
by and for the public. The park was given in memory of 
Mr. Harrison's mother, Mrs. Minta Harrison, and is to be 
known as "Harrison Park." Mr. Harrison and his mother, 
during her lifetime, had often discussed its scenic beauty 
and advantages as a public park. Sixty-four acres of the 
tract was under lease for many years to the Danville Coun- 
try Club and Mr. Harrison and his mother were wont to 
sit on the clubhouse veranda and look out over the beautiful 
golf course to the wooded acres and hills across the river 
and discuss what its use as a public park would mean to 
the future of Danville. Following the purchase of the land 
from Carroll Williams and the Interstate Water Company, 
the Danville Country Club gave up its lease to move to its 
new location on the west side of Lake Vermilion, and the 
clubhouse was bought by the city. 

In addition to the 64 acres under lease to the Danville 
Country Club, the tract runs through to the road by the 
old Woodbury farm, the river dividing the park. Bridges 
will be built, making every part of the park accessible to 
the public. Already an entrance has been made from the 
west side off the Woodbury Hill Road, making the beauti- 
ful grove, with deep ravines on either side, available for 
picnic purposes. 

Harrison Park has been pronounced one of the greatest 
scenic spots in Illinois. Its hills and its ravines, the river 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 565 

cutting it in two, its wooded slopes, all blend to make it 
the most beautiful spot in Illinois. Nature left nothing to 
be supplied in the way of scenery. A spring of ice cold 
water at the bottom of one of the ravines on the west side 
adds the touch of completeness. 

The park is a natural arboretum, presenting the op- 
portunity for the study of trees, such as is offered by no 
other wooded tract in Illinois. Oaks of all descriptions, 
ash, maple, beech, dogwood, red cedars, black walnut, but- 
ternut, hickory, hawthorn, linn, cottonwood, coffee, locust, 
sycamore, wild cherry, willow are but a part of the mar- 
velous assortment of trees. Stately white pines, native to 
Illinois, are found on the west side, perhaps the only touch 
to the natural beauty added by man, for they were planted 
some eighty years ago by Dr. W. W. R. Woodbury. The 
park offers tremendous possibilities along the line of de- 
velopment, exclusive of the magnificent nine-hole golf 
course, built and maintained by the Danville Country Club 
for many years and which represents an outlay of several 
hundred thousand dollars, of which the public will now 
reap the benefit. 

It is safe to predict that Harrison Park will in the 
years to come become one of the scenic attractions of Illi- 
nois, attracting thousands of visitors each year. 



Elmer O. Furrow. — One of Danville's prominent men 
is Elmer 0. Furrow, who holds the rank of State's Attor- 
ney. He is a veteran of the World War, having served in 
France with the Thirty-third Division. Mr. Furrow was 
born at Potomac, Vermilion County, March 29, 1885, the 
son of William Henry and Jessie H. (Ray) Furrow. 

William Henry Furrow was born at Potomac in 1853. 
Throughout his life he engaged in general farming and 
stock raising in Vermilion County. He retired in 1919 



566 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and removed to Oakwood, Illinois, where he died Novem- 
ber 13, 1925. His widow lives at Potomac. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Furrow were born three children: Estelle, married 
Elmer Rickert, lives at Potomac; Elmer 0., the subject of 
this sketch; and George, who died August 25, 1927. 

William Henry Furrow was the son of William R. Fur- 
row, who was born in Ohio in 1830. He became a pros- 
perous farmer and stockman of Vermilion County, where 
he died in 1901. He is buried at Armstrong, Illinois. 
Jessie H. (Ray) Furrow was the daughter of John L. Ray, 
who came to the United States from Ireland. He was a 
tailor by trade and spent many years at Mayview, Illinois. 

After completing his early schooling at Danville, Elmer 
0. Furrow was graduated from the University of Illinois 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1909. He was grad- 
uated the following year from the Law School of the 
University of Colorado and engaged in practice at Steam- 
boat Springs, Colorado, until 1913. He then returned to 
Illinois and engaged in private practice at Danville until 
August, 1917, at which time he enlisted for service in the 
World War. He attended the Officers Training School at 
Fort Sheridan, Illinois, where he was commissioned first 
lieutenant, Field Artillery. He subsequently was sent to 
France, and attended the Saumur School of Artillery. 
Throughout the war period he was attached to Battery B, 
One Hundred Twenty-fourth Field Artillery, Thirty-third 
Division, and was later commissioned captain. He partici- 
pated in the engagements at Meuse-Argonne, and the St. 
Mihiel Offensive, and was cited for gallantry at Epinon- 
ville, France, October 4, 1918. He was discharged at Camp 
Grant, May 9, 1919. After the close of the war Mr. Furrow 
resumed the practice of law at Danville. In December, 
1924, he took the office of State's Attorney, and was 
reelected to office in December, 1928. He had previously 
served as assistant State's Attorney for three years. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 567 

In 1925 Mr. Furrow married Pauline Davis, the daugh- 
ter of Floyd and Catherine Davis, natives of Indiana. 

Mr. Furrow is a Republican, a member of the Christian 
Church, Elks Club, Knights of Pythias, Loyal Order of 
Moose, Modern Woodmen of America, and Rose Lawn 
Country Club. He also belongs to the American Legion 
and Veterans of Foreign Wars. 



Hon. Lawrence T. Allen. — For many years Lawrence 
T. Allen has been a prominent citizen of Danville, a leading 
member of the bar, and actively concerned in all that serves 
to promote the welfare of his community. He was born 
at Hoopeston, Illinois, October 24, 1882, the son of Charles 
A. and Mary (Thompson) Allen. 

Charles A. Allen was born at Rossville, Illinois, the son 
of William I. and Emily (Newell) Allen. William I. Allen 
served throughout the Civil War and held the rank of 
captain. He was county treasurer of Vermilion County 
and also served as justice of the peace. His wife, Emily 
Newell, was the daughter of Esquire Newell, after whom 
Newell Township, Vermilion County, was named. Charles 
A. Allen was graduated from the law school of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan and became a leading attorney of Ver- 
milion County. He was active in local politics and served 
for twenty-four years as a member of the Illinois State 
Legislature. He married Mary Thompson, the daughter 
of Lewis M. and Judith (Burrough) Thompson, early set- 
tlers of Danville. 

Lawrence T. Allen received his early education in the 
public schools of Hoopeston and following his graduation 
from Greer College attended the University of Chicago, 
and the University of Illinois, from which he was grad- 
uated in law in 1905. He took an active part in college 
athletics and was also a member of the University band 



568 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and glee club. He was admitted to the bar in 1905 and at 
once engaged in the practice of law at Danville. From 
1910 until 1918 he served as county judge of Vermilion 
County and in 1922 was appointed assistant United States 
District Attorney for the Eastern District of Illinois. In 
1924 under the appointment of the United States Attorney 
General's office he served as special government prosecutor 
in full charge of the federal prosecutions of the noted 
Williamson County liquor cases. 

Mr. Allen was married November 4, 1911, at Cham- 
paign, Illinois, to Miss Bess Trevett. They have two sons, 
John T., and Lawrence T. 

Mr. Allen is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge, Elks 
Club, Sons of the American Revolution, Sigma Chi and 
Phi Delta Phi fraternities, and Danville Country Club. 
During the World War he served as major in the Tenth 
Illinois Infantry. 



William Franklin Banta is a highly esteemed and widely 
known citizen of Ridgefarm, where he has spent his entire 
life. He was born in Elwood Township, Vermilion 
County, December 9, 1857, the son of James Henry and 
Mary (Russell) Banta. 

James Henry Banta was a native of Flat Rock, Bour- 
bon County, Kentucky. The Banta geneology, printed in 
1893, states that the Bantas are descendants of Epke 
Jacobse, who came from Friesland, Netherlands, to New 
Amsterdam in February, 1659. The present Banta family 
at Ridgefarm is the ninth generation of this family. The 
history of the family also states that they were a very re- 
ligious people. James Henry Banta, father of the subject 
of this sketch, was a farmer and was also interested in the 
grain business. Both he and his wife are buried in Crown 
Hill Cemetery, Ridgefarm. They were the parents of the 
following children: James A., deceased; William Frank- 




Urj& 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 569 

lin, the subject of this sketch ; Nancy Elizabeth, deceased ; 
Sarah Ann, deceased ; Margaret Ellen, lives at Dana, Ind. ; 
Amy Dorcas, lives at Danville, 111. ; Andrew Jackson, lives 
at Long Beach, Calif.; and John Harley, lives at Ridge- 
farm. 

William Franklin Banta remained with his parents on 
the farm until he was 12 years of age, when the family 
removed to Ridgefarm. He received a limited education 
but never failed to take advantage of opportunities to sup- 
plement his education and early in life was recognized as 
a well informed young business man. Mr. Banta served an 
apprenticeship at the miller's trade and followed this busi- 
ness until 1882, when he purchased the mill property, 
which he continued to own and operate until his retire- 
ment from the grain business in October, 1908. The 
original mill building was erected in 1871 by Davis & Com- 
pany. It was later equipped with a full set of rollers, op- 
erating by gradual reduction process and which utilized 
Nordyke Norman & Company's system of milling. This 
mill turned out the very best of flour, the Peerless brand 
being fine and pure. The Ridge Farm Mill grew steadily 
in popularity and Mr. Banta shipped about 700 carloads of 
grain annually and 300 cars of hay. He gave employment 
to many men and never failed to advance the business in- 
terests of his town. Since his retirement from the grain 
business in 1908 Mr. Banta has been interested in the stock 
and bond business with offices in the City National Bank 
Building, Ridgefarm. 

On November 14, 1889, Mr. Banta was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Buena V. Jerome, born in Milwaukee, 
Wis., the daughter of Oliver and Sarah Jane (Crawford) 
Jerome, natives of Ohio and Canada. The Crawfords were 
early settlers of Vermilion County. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Jerome are deceased. Three children were born to Mrs. 
and Mrs. Banta: Russell Crawford Banta was born De- 
cember 30, 1890, and died July 3, 1917. He married Miss 



570 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Edith Elder of Georgetown, 111. She now resides in Holly- 
wood, California. One child was born to this union, Wil- 
liam Russell. Helen T. Banta was born December 8, 1893, 
and died January 6, 1919. She was married to Russell P. 
Jones of Ridgefarm. To this union three children were 
born: Billie Banta, and twin daughters, Helen Elizabeth, 
and Anna Buena. The twins are being reared by Mr. and 
Mrs. William F. Banta. Robert Jerome Banta was born 
December 20, 1902, married Ida Gerlough Terry of Sidell, 
Illinois. They have one son, Robert Terry Banta. 

Politically, Mr. Banta has always been a Democrat, and 
he has served as a member of the local school board for 
thirty-two years. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church, and belongs to the Masonic Lodge, thirty-second 
degree, and since November 3, 1880, he has been a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Banta 
has without doubt inherited from his sturdy ancestors 
those qualities of character which are inseparable from the 
successful business man and useful citizen. 



Fred Lincoln Endicott. — In the responsible public office 
of county treasurer Fred Lincoln Endicott is devoting to 
the welfare of the people the talent and experience which 
have carried him to individual success and in his practical 
application of his abilities to the public service he is doing 
much for the local progress and well being. Mr. Endicott 
was born in Pilot Township, Vermilion County, June 22, 
1876, the son of Austin and Ella (Ray) Endicott. 

Austin Endicott was born in Pilot Township, and spent 
his entire life in Vermilion County. He was born in 1842 
and died in 1878. Mr. Endicott was a carpenter and 
farmer. He was a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, and Masonic lodge. His widow, born in Indiana 
in 1855, lives at Frankfort, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Endi- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 571 

cott had only one child, Fred Lincoln, the subject of this 
sketch. 

Austin Endicott was the son of Samuel and Nancy 
(Neal) Endicott, natives of Indiana. They were early 
settlers of Vermilion County, where Mr. Endicott became 
successful as a farmer and stock raiser. Ella (Ray) Endi- 
cott is the daughter of John and Hattie (Woodard) Ray, 
also natives of Indiana. Both are buried in Mount Hope 
Cemetery, Champaign County, Illinois. Hattie (Woodard) 
Ray was the sister of Wilkie Woodard, who laid out the 
city of Lafayette, Indiana. 

Fred Lincoln Endicott has always been interested in 
farming. He spent his boyhood in Vermilion County and 
received his education in the district schools. In 1914 he 
purchased two hunded and twenty acres of land from 
Hon. Joseph Cannon, which was located in Oakwood Town- 
ship, near Muncie, Indiana. He added to his holdings later 
with a purchase of forty acres from the estate of the 
Cannon heirs. This farm, located in Montgomery County, 
Indiana, is now rented by Mr. Edicott. He also owns a 
well improved farm of thirty acres near Danville. 

Mr. Endicott served as tax collector of Pilot Township 
for a period of six years, and as road commissioner for 
nine years. He was elected county treasurer of Vermilion 
County in November, 1926, and took office on December 6, 
1926. ' 

In September, 1905, Mr. Endicott was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Nettie Epler, the daughter of John W. 
and Nancy (Williams) Epler, of Champaign County, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Epler died in 1926 and his wife died in 1924. 
They are buried at Fisher, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Endi- 
cott were born four children: 1. Alma, married Cord 
Davis, lives at Oakwood, Illinois. They have two daugh- 
ters, Nettie May and Margaret. 2. Charles, married 
Mereith Moorehouse, lives at Terre Haute, Indiana. They 
have three children: Wayne, Thelma, and Adine. 3. 



572 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Wilbur Austin, married Marie Bennett, lives at Farmers- 
burg, Indiana. 4. Esther, married George Dysert, lives 
at Oakland City, Indiana. They have a son, Marion. 

Mr. Endicott is a member of the Methodist Church, and 
is affiliated with Collison Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons No. 714; Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; 
Loyal Order of Moose ; and Modern Woodmen of America. 

Politically, Mr. Endicott has always been a Republican. 



John R. Moore. — Perhaps one of the best known and 
most highly esteemed men of Vermilion County is found 
in John R. Moore, who is serving as county clerk. He is 
a native of Vermilion County, born on a farm in Blount 
Township, July 12, 1869, the son of Rufus S. and Filena 
(Rowley) Moore. 

Rufus S. Moore was born near Akron, Ohio, in 1826. 
His wife was born near Attica, Indiana, in 1833. He was 
educated in Ohio, where he spent his boyhood. Mr. Moore 
was a wagonmaker by trade and after coming to Danville 
in 1867 was employed in the building of the Wabash bridge. 
About 1868 he purchased a farm, which he operated until 
the time of his death in June, 1910. His wife died in 1895. 
Both are buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. Mr. 
Moore was a Republican and served as school director and 
treasurer. He held membership in the Methodist Church 
and belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
There were five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Moore: 
William R., died in 1918; Albert S., lives retired on the 
old homestead; U. Elmer, lives at Bismarck, Illinois; Emily 
R., died in 1927; and John R., the subject of this sketch. 

John R. Moore has always lived in Vermilion County. 
He received his early schooling in the district schools and 
spent two years at Valparaiso University. In 1892, after 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 573 

leaving college he became identified with the county offices 
at Danville and the following year was appointed deputy 
county clerk, under Walter C. Tuttle. The following year 
he was reappointed to this office under Thomas J. Dale, 
with whom he was associated until 1914. He was then 
elected county clerk and has continued to serve in that 
capacity to the present time, being again reelected to office 
in 1926. 

In 1895 Mr. Moore married Miss Ida A. Ashworth, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Garrison Ashworth, natives of 
Indiana, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have 
two children: Miriam A., employed in her father's office 
as deputy county clerk; and Edward G., connected with 
the Health Department, Chicago. 

Politically, Mr. Moore is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the First Presbyterian Church, and belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of 
America, and Order of Redmen. 



John D. Cole, county coroner, is regarded as one of the 
substantial and best known citizens of Danville and Ver- 
milion County. He is also a veteran of the World War, 
having served in France with the famous "Rainbow" Divi- 
sion. Mr. Cole was born near Catlin, Illinois, October 24, 
1877, the son of W. A. and Fannie (Finley) Cole. 

W. A. Cole, well known resident of Danville, is a native 
of Ohio, born at Zanesville in 1847. His wife was born at 
Danville in 1857. Mr. Cole began life as a railroader, and 
was employed as a fireman on the old Zanesville & Ohio 
Railroad. He came to Vermilion County in 1875 and spent 
three years as a farmer, after which he removed to Fort 
Scott, Kansas. He returned to Illinois in 1890 and became 
an engineer on the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. 
In 1894 he became interested in the coal business and is 



574 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

thus engaged at the present time. Mr. Cole is a Repub- 
lican and a member of the Lincoln Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Cole: 
John D., the subject of this sketch; Charles, deceased; and 
Stella, married Edward Tate, lives at Danville. 

Fannie (Finley) Cole is the daughter of John Finley, 
who settled near Catlin, Illinois, in 1831, being one of the 
first settlers of that section. He was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

John D. Cole grew up at Fort Scott, Kansas, and at- 
tended school there, the grade schools of Danville and the 
Danville High School. He then attended Danville Bus- 
iness College in 1899. He began his business career with 
Bell's Clothing Store, Danville, as bookkeeper and cashier. 
In 1908 he founded the Danville Gymnasium, which he suc- 
cessfully operated until 1916. Mr. Cole was elected coroner 
of Vermilion County in December, 1920. He was re-elected 
in December, 1921; November, 1924; and again in Novem- 
ber, 1928. 

During the Spanish-American War Mr. Cole enlisted 
in Battery A, First Illinois Field Artillery, and served in 
Porto Rico, being discharged as a private in November, 
1898. He re-enlisted in the same battery and served until 
1900. Five years later he again enlisted in Battery A. 
He served on the Mexican Border in 1916, and was mus- 
tered out of the federal service in February, 1917. During 
the World War he again enlisted in Battery A, First Illi- 
nois Field Artillery, which became the One Hundred Forty- 
ninth Field Artillery of the Forty-second Division. Mr. 
Cole saw active service in France and participated in seven 
major engagements. He was made color sergeant of this 
regiment and was discharged in May, 1919. He has since 
re-enlisted and received the commission of Second Lieu- 
tenant. 

Mr. Cole is a Republican, a member of the First Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, Elks Club, Loyal Order of Moose, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 575 

Order of Redmen, Knights of Pythias, American Legion, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, and United Spanish War 
Veterans. 



Clarence E. Vance, who is superintendent of the city 
schools of Danville, is widely known in the educational 
life of Vermilion County. He was born at Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, September 25, 1882, the son of Joseph R. and 
Elizabeth (Shanklin) Vance. 

Joseph R. Vance was a native of Lafayette, Indiana. 
He served for many years as police magistrate at Hoopes- 
ton, Illinois. He died at Hoopeston, Illinois, in 1916 and 
his wife died in 1918. Both are buried at Hoopeston. Their 
children were: C. M., lives at Urbana, Illinois; W. A., lives 
at Hoopeston, Illinois; Mrs. Dan Fitzgerald, lives at Los 
Angeles, California; Mrs. F. M. Schlippy, lives at Los 
Angeles, California; and Clarence E., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Clarence E. Vance attended the public schools of 
Hoopeston. He completed a course at the State Teachers 
College, Normal, Illinois, and later received the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts from the University 
of Illinois. The professional educational work of Mr. 
Vance has been as follows: a teacher in the rural and vil- 
lage schools; principal of grade schools; district superin- 
tendent; assistant superintendent; and city superin- 
tendent. 

In June, 1906, Mr. Vance was united in marriage with 
Miss Eva M. DeWitt, of Milford, Illinois, the daughter of 
E. A. and Olive (Hobson) DeWitt, the former a native of 
Newark, New Jersey, and the latter of Milford, Illinois. 
Mr. DeWitt is deceased, and his widow lives in Los Angeles, 
California. Mr. and Mrs. Vance have a son, John DeWitt, 
born April 27, 1909. He attends the University of Illinois. 



576 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mr. Vance is a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, Masonic Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
Grotto, Kappa Delta Pi, Sigma Delta Sigma, and Phi Delta 
Kappa fraternities, and Kiwanis Club. 

Mr. Vance's maternal great-grandfather was one of the 
founders of Wabash College. His paternal grandfather 
was a teacher of languages in Cincinnati in 1830. The 
Vance family is of Scotch descent and the Shanklins were 
political refugees from England. 



Alfred Henry Trego. — To be well beloved by the com- 
munity in which he spent the many years of his mature 
manhood, to be still active in the business and civic life of 
that community after he had passed the allotted period 
granted to man, to be ungrudged the honorably earned suc- 
cess and distinction that crowned his years, such was the 
happy lot of Alfred H. Trego, whose wish to "died in har- 
ness" had been frequently expressed by him. A son of the 
Keystone State, Mr. Trego came from a long line of Ameri- 
can ancestry, who trace their lineage back to France, to 
the time of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in the 
reign of Louis XIV. The Hugeunots by the edict issued by 
Henry IV in 1588 had been granted freedom and liberty of 
conscience and worship. In 1685 at its revocation the cruel 
persecutions that followed drove them out of their home 
land by thousands and they sought refuge in those welcom- 
ing lands that hospitably received them, many going to 
England and from there to America to join William Penn's 
colony of Friends. 

So came Peter Trego, the founder of the American 
branch of the Trego family. He was born in France in 
1655 and according to old manuscripts no mention is made 
of other members of his family accompanying him to 




^//c£ 



/\-~* — ^ e> 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 577 

America, where he is next heard of as landing in this coun- 
try in 1682 and in 1690 as an inhabitant of that part of 
Chester, now known as Delaware County. He married 
Judith, and their first child was Jacob. Jacob Trego was 
born in Chester, now Delaware County, Pennsylvania, 
August 7, 1687. He married Mary Cartlege, December 1, 
1710. They removed to Merion, later Middleton, and were 
the progenitors of the Bucks County branch of the Trego 
family. He died at Middleton, April 10, 1724. He had 
four children, among whom was John. John Trego, son of 
Jacob and Mary (Cartlege) Trego, was born in Chester 
County, Pennsylvania, May 6, 1715, and he married Han- 
nah Hester. They had seven children, of whom one was 
William. William Trego, son of John and Hannah (Hes- 
ter) Trego, was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 
March 16, 1744. He married Rebecca Hibbs, of Byberry, 
Ben-Salem Township, September 19, 1768. He died in 
1827. They had nine children, of whom Jacob is men- 
tioned. Jacob Trego, son of William and Rebecca (Hibbs) 
Trego, was born October 28, 1780. He married Letitia 
Smith. He died October 3, 1870. Curtis D. Trego, son of 
Jacob and Letitia (Smith) Trego, was born in Bucks 
County, Pennsylvania, September 18, 1809. He married 
Mary Gilbert on October 30, 1834. 

Alfred H. Trego, oldest son of Curtis D. and Mary 
(Gilbert) Trego, was born June 16, 1838. His father fol- 
lowed farming and about 1840 started with his family for 
the Middle West, traveling in covered wagon to Mercer 
County, 111., where he established his home upon a farm. 
In 1856 he removed to Galesburg, his object being to give 
his children a better chance for their education, and to do 
this he carried on a grocery business for several years at 
Galesburg. During the Civil War he became engaged in 
purchasing horses for the post at Gallatin, Tennessee. Sub- 
sequently, he resided at Orion, Henry County, Illinois, and 

3— Vol. 2 



578 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

the last ten years of his life he spent in Cass County, Iowa, 
where both he and his wife died. 

Alfred H. Trego was five years of age when his family 
made the overland journey to Mercer County, and his ex- 
periences were those that fell to the lot of farmer boys in 
pioneer times. His preliminary education, acquired in the 
district schools, was followed by instruction gained in Lom- 
bard College, Galesburg, from which he was graduated in 
1862. The month following his graduation, at the age of 
24 years, he offered his services to the government, joining- 
Company C, of the 102nd Illinois Infantry, under Capt. 
Frank Shedd, and Col. McMurtry. He served until the end 
of the war when he was honorably discharged in 1865, hav- 
ing seen active service during all that time. He served in 
Kentucky and Tennessee, and also in the campaign at Cin- 
cinnati. Subsequently he was stationed at Gallatin, Ten- 
nessee, where he served as aide-de-camp to Gen. E. A. 
Paine, continuing there until April, 1864, when he joined 
General Sherman's forces at Chattanooga, and owing to 
the absence of his captain on detached duty, took charge of 
the company as first lieutenant. He served throughout the 
Atlanta campaign until that city was captured and later 
was made adjutant general of the First Brigade of the 
Third Division of the Twentieth Corps, commanded by 
General Hooker. With that rank he served on the "march 
to the sea" in the campaign to Savannah, and from that 
point marching through the Carolinas and on to Wash- 
ton, being mustered out of service in June, 1865. He was 
wounded three times. 

After the war Mr. Trego returned to Galesburg, but 
soon after he removed to Rock Island, 111., where he en- 
gaged in the retail grocery business with his father for one 
year. He then went to Chicago, Illinois, where for a brief 
period he was employed as a bookkeeper in a commission 
house. In 1867 he established a commission business of his 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 579 

own on South Water Street. In 1871 the terrible fire that 
swept Chicago completely wiped out his business, the in- 
surance company paying only ten cents on a dollar for the 
loss. His resources gone, Mr. Trego went as a dock laborer 
at $1.50 per day, working six months and he then was pro- 
moted to shipping clerk, remaining until 1877, when he re- 
moved to Hoopeston. After locating in this city, Mr. Trego 
opened a lumber yard. He was very energetic and de- 
termined, and soon developed and built up a business that 
enabled him to discharge his financial obligations. In 1888 
he established branch yards at Wellington, Illinois, and 
Ambia, Ind., and in the meantime became engaged in the 
canning business, associated with J. S. McFerren and A. T. 
Catherwood. In 1886 the present business, the Hoopeston 
Canning Company, was established, beginning operations 
on a small scale. During the first season the company 
canned from thirty to forty thousand cans ; later this grew 
to two hundred thousand cans and the employment in- 
creased from three hundred to four hundred people during 
the season. After Mr. Trego became identified with the 
business the trade extended throughout the United States, 
this being the largest corn canning factory in the country. 
In 1910 they canned about six million cans, representing 
the products of about three thousand five hundred acres. 
The growth of this mammoth enterprise was largely due 
to the splendid business ability developed through his ca- 
reer by Mr. Trego, to his executive force and administra- 
tive powers. 

Mr. Trego was also one of the eight organizers of the 
Union Can Company in 1894, which in 1900 was merged 
with the American Can Company, and Mr. Trego became 
a stock holder. He was also a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Hoopeston. He was equal owner with J. S. 
McFerran of one thousand seven hundred acres of land 
in Grant Township, Vermilion County, and also had ex- 



580 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

tensive real estate holdings in Chicago. He was president 
of the Illinois Cuban Land Company, owners of twenty 
thousand acres near Santiago, Cuba, and he was president 
of the Cuban Cattle Company. The successful manage- 
ment of all of these companies with which he was con- 
nected was due in large measure to the impetus and guid- 
ance of his sound judgment and enterprising spirit. Mr. 
Trego also found time for civic duties and large social ac- 
tivities, and Hoopeston has benefited much by the spirit of 
cooperation that made him a chief factor in her advance- 
ment, not alone in trade but in civic virtue and socially. 

Mr. Trego married (first) in October, 1869, Miss 
Frances Caroline Reed, a native of Farmington, Illinois. 
She died April 27, 1897. Their children were : Charles H., 
born August 3, 1870, died November 10, 1918; Carrie 
Jean, deceased; Edward Francis, born September 22, 
1876; Walter, born September 20, 1883; Sidney Reed, de- 
ceased; and Gilbert Curtis, born February 22, 1888. Mr. 
Trego was married (second) to Florence Andrews Honey- 
well, who before her marriage was a portrait, scenic and 
landscape artist, as well as a teacher of art. She was born 
at Logansport, Indiana, the daughter of Alba and Cornelia 
(Andrews) Honeywell, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this history. 

Mr. Trego was always a Republican and served as 
mayor and alderman of Hoopeston. He was a member of 
the Universalist Church and served as Sunday School su- 
perintendent for over thirty years. He was affiliated with 
Star Lodge, No. 709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Hoopeston Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Knights Tem- 
plar; and Grand Army of the Republic. He was a trustee 
of Lombard College and secretary of the Board of Trustees 
of Greer College. 

Mr. Trego died October 19, 1915, and is buried in 
Floral Hill Cemetery, Hoopeston. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 581 

Otis Kercher, of Danville, is prominent throughout Ver- 
milion County, of which he is serving as farm adviser. 
He was born at Goshen, Indiana, September 9, 1892, the 
son of Abraham and Anna (Buzzard) Kercher. 

Abraham Kercher was born in Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1851, and removed to Warren County, 
Ohio, with his parents when he was one year old. Later 
the family settled at Goshen, Indiana, where Mr. Kercher 
spent the remainder of his life. He died in 1922, and his 
wife, a native of Elkhart County, Indiana, died in 1906. 
Both are buried in Waterford Cemetery, Goshen. Mr. 
Kercher was a Republican and a member of the Menonnite 
Church. The following children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Kercher: Olive, deceased; Cora E., teacher in 
Women's College, Montgomery, Alabama; William Wheel- 
er, lives at Goshen, Indiana; Rosa Venetta, lives at Goshen; 
Lawrence Eugene, principal of Elkhart Township Schools, 
lives at Goshen; John Wesley, lives at Dayton, Ohio; Noble 
B., deceased; Oscar B., World War veteran, lives at Fort 
Worth, Texas; Otis, the subject of this sketch; and Merrill 
Abraham, engineer, with the Bell Telephone Company, 
Philadelphia. He is a graduate of the United States Naval 
Academy, Annapolis, and served throughout the World 
War. 

Abraham Kercher was the son of William and Mary 
(Moyer) Kercher. They came from Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania, and in 1852 settled in Warren County, Ohio, 
and later located at Goshen, Indiana. He owned and 
operated a blacksmith shop at that place and for a number 
of years employed the Studebaker brothers as wagon- 
makers. William Kercher was the son of John Kercher, 
who came to Pennsylvania from Holland, being the pos- 
sessor of a land grant from William Penn near the present 
site of Reading, Pennsylvania. 

Otis Kercher obtained his early education in the public 
schools of Goshen and in 1914 received the degree of 
Bachelor of Science from the University of Illinois. He 



582 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

taught agriculture at Homer, Louisiana, and later became 
head of the agriculture department at the State Industrial 
School at Rushton, Louisiana. In February, 1915, Mr. 
Kercher became identified with the Bureau of Agriculture 
and Animal Husbandry at the University of Kentucky. 
He was appointed farm adviser of Pike County, Illinois, 
in November, 1919, where he remained until March, 1924. 
He has since served in the capacity of farm adviser of 
Vermilion County. 

In 1914 Mr. Kercher married Miss Genevieve Williams, 
the daughter of T. B. and Anna (Lucas) Williams, of Sidell, 
Illinois. They have a son, Richard Allen, born March 7, 
1925. 

Mr. Kercher is a Republican, a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Masonic Lodge, Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, Epsilon Sigma Phi fraternity, and Dan- 
ville Rod and Gun Club. He is also a member of the Ken- 
tacky Academy of Science and a member of the staff of 
the United States Department of Agriculture. 



John A. Foster, justice of the peace, is a representative 
citizen of Danville. He was born at Auburn, New York, 
December 26, 1868, the son of William N. and Eleanor (Mc- 
intosh) Foster. 

William N. Foster, deceased, was a leading druggist of 
Auburn, New York, where he was born. He was a grad- 
uate of the University of Syracuse. Later in life, due to 
ill health, he retired from business and lived on a farm 
near Fosterville, New York. He died in 1866 and his wife 
died in 1883. Both are buried at Fosterville. Mr. Foster 
was a Republican and held membership in the Methodist 
Church. Mr. and Mrs. Foster were the parents of three 
children: John A., the subject of this sketch; Nellie, the 
widow of Thomas Clark, lives at Auburn, New York ; and 
Thomas J., who died in 1893. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 583 

John A. Foster was educated in the public schools of 
Auburn from which he was graduated in 1890. He then 
attended the University of Michigan and in 1892 was ad- 
mitted to the bar. He engaged in private practice at 
Manistique, Saint Joseph, and Benton Harbor, Michigan. 
He also served one term as prosecuting attorney of School- 
craft County, Michigan. In 1898 Mr. Foster enlisted in 
Company E, Second United States Volunteer Engineers, 
and was sent to Cuba. He took part in engagements near 
Santiago and was mustered out of service at Havana, 
Cuba. He then accepted a government position as quarter- 
master's agent at Havana for the entire Island. He re- 
mained there until October, 1902, when he returned to 
this country and engaged in the oil business at Beaumont, 
Texas. Later he spent five years as assistant superintend- 
ent of the Sells-Forpaugh circus, and in 1907 went to 
Chicago, where he became assistant curator of the medical 
department, University of Illinois. He came to Danville 
in 1909 and was identified with the Soldiers Home here in 
various capacities for eighteen years. He was elected jus- 
tice of the peace in May, 1927. 

On July 7, 1907, Mr. Foster married Miss Annie E. 
Page, of Chicago, the daughter of Dr. Albert Allison and 
Sarah Elizabeth (McCormick) Page. Doctor Page was a 
graduate of the University of Missouri and engaged in the 
practice of medicine at Clinton, Missouri, for many years. 
He died in 1869, and his wife died in 1887. They are buried 
in Kansas City, Missouri. Doctor and Mrs. Page were the 
parents of three children: Mamie, the widow of Robert 
Holmes, lives at Kansas City, Missouri; George A., lives 
at Los Angeles, California; and Annie E. Foster. 

Mr. Foster is a Republican and is affiliated with Vet- 
erans of Foreign Wars, Post Number Seven Hundred 
Twenty-eight, and Spanish-American War Veterans, John 
A. Logan Camp, Number Forty-one. 



584 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Hon. Joseph B. Mann. — The city of Danville lost one of 
its most prominent and valuable citizens in the death of 
Joseph B. Mann, which occurred on July 5, 1924. He was 
outstanding as a lawyer, being familiarly known as the 
"Dean" of the Vermilion County Bar Association, and he 
was also a leader in the civic and social life of the city. Mr. 
Mann was born at Somerville, New Jersey, November 9, 
1843, the son of John M. and Elizabeth (Bonnell) Mann. 

The Mann family is of Scotch and Dutch descent and 
the Bonnells are of French and Irish extraction. The 
Manns settled in Pennsylvania at an early date. The pa- 
ternal grandfather of Joseph B. Mann fought at the battle 
of Germantown, where he was in command of a militia 
regiment. His great grandfather Mattison was a private 
soldier in the Revolutionary War. 

John M. Mann, father of the subject of this sketch, was 
a native of Pennsylvania. He was a lawyer and engaged 
in the practice of his profession in New Jersey for thirty- 
five years. He was also prominent in public affairs and 
served as a member of the New Jersey State Legislature, 
as county clerk and surrogate of Somerset County, N. J., 
and he also held many minor offices. Both John M. Mann 
and his wife are buried at Somerville, New Jersey. They 
were the parents of eight children, of whom Joseph B., the 
subject of this sketch, was the youngest. During the Civil 
War four sons entered the service ; William, who served as 
adjutant of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry; Charles B., who served as major of 
the Seventy-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was 
wounded at the battle of Chickamauga; Samuel B., who 
served as a sergeant major in the Third New Jersey Vol- 
unteer Infantry; and John W., who served as adjutant of 
the Twenty-Seventh New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. He 
died from an attack of typhoid fever, which was contracted 
while in service in the army. 




HON. JOSEPH B. MANN 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 585 

Joseph B. Mann attended the public and private schools 
of Somerville, New Jersey, and also attended a boarding 
school at Flatbush, New York. He was graduated from 
Riverview Military Academy, Poughkeepsie, New York, 
and Rutgers College, New Brunswick, New Jersey, in the 
class of 1865. He came west in the fall of that year and 
settled in Chicago, where he attended Kent Law School. 
The following spring he located at Danville and entered the 
law offices of the late Judge Oliver L. Davis, being ad- 
mitted to the bar in March, 1867. He practiced law alone 
for several months and then was elected city attorney of 
Danville in May, 1867, holding office one year and refus- 
ing the re-election. He then became associated in prac- 
tice with Judge E. S. Terry and in March, 1868, formed a 
partnership with Judge 0. L. Davis, which continued until 
1873. Mr. Mann then became a member of the circuit 
court and engaged in practice alone until 1875, when a 
partnership was formed with W. J. Calhoun. Later, 
DeWitt C. Frazier was admitted to the firm, which con- 
tinued until the election of Mr. Calhoun as State's attorney. 
In 1885 Mr. Mann became identified with Judge 0. L. 
Davis, who had retired from the bench. Three years later, 
however, Judge Davis retired from active practice and 
Mr. Mann again resumed partnership with Mr. Calhoun 
until 1892. At that time Mr. Mann removed to Chicago, 
and was associated with Curtis H. Remy until 1901, when 
he returned to Danville. He practiced alone from 1901 
until his retirement in 1917. One of the most important 
cases tried by Mr. Mann was that which arose out of the 
Iroquois Theatre fire in Chicago, in which he was one of 
the attorneys for the defense. 

Mr. Mann was a life long Democrat. He served for 
one term as alderman of Danville and in 1881 was elected 
a member of the Illinois General Assembly. In 1909 he be- 
came corporation counsel. He was identified with the Ver- 
milion County Bar Society, Illinois State Bar Society, and 



586 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

American Bar Association. He was a member of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 

As an after dinner speaker Mr. Mann was widely 
known throughout the State and was called upon to ad- 
dress numerous gatherings in Chicago, where he had an 
extensive acquaintance and a host of friends and ad- 
mirers. 

Mr. Mann married in January, 1874, Miss Lucy A. 
Davis, the daughter of Judge Oliver L. and Sarah M. (Cun- 
ningham) Davis. Judge Davis was a native of New York 
City and came to Danville in the early 40's. He was one 
of the first appellate judges in this section and served as 
circuit judge for thirty years. He was a personal friend 
of Abraham Lincoln, riding the circuit with him. It is be- 
lieved that Judge Davis was the last man in Illinois to see 
President Lincoln alive, having met him at the station. 
Judge Davis ranked among the leading jurists of this sec- 
tion. He was offered a post in the cabinet of Lincoln, but 
declined the honor. Judge Davis died in January, 1892, 
and his wife died in August of the same year. To Joseph B. 
and Lucy A. (Davis) Mann were born three children: 
Fred B., lives at East Orange, N. J. ; Oliver D., well known 
attorney of Danville; and Nell M., the widow of Howard 
Shedd, lives at Danville. 

Mr. Mann is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. 



Douglas F. Stevens is an active, enterprising business 
man of Danville, where he is vice president and general 
manager of the Acme Brick Company. He was born at 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, September 27, 1883, the son of 
Charles P. and Mary Elizabeth (Neilson) Stevens. 

Charles P. Stevens was a native of Ashburnham, Massa- 
chusetts, born in 1840. At the age of fourteen years he 
went with his father's business and was interested in the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 587 

manufacture of furniture in Baltimore, Maryland, until 
1880. He then removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and 
engaged in the retail furniture business in that city for 
ten years. In 1890 he settled at Evanston, Illinois, where 
he became active in politics, serving as city treasurer. In 
1906 he organized the Acme Brick Company, of Danville, 
Illinois, although he maintained his residence at Evanston. 
He became president of the new enterprise and continued 
as its active head until the time of his death in 1914. His 
wife, born at Baltimore, Maryland, died in 1917. Both are 
buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois. Their 
children were: Charles Neilson, president of the City 
National Bank and Trust Company, and president of the 
Acme Brick Company, lives in Evanston, Illinois; Annie, 
married Edward F. Webster, lives at Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia; Mary Florence, the widow of Samuel A. Dickie, 
lives at Evanston, Illinois; Edna, deceased; and Douglas 
Franklin, the subject of this sketch. Mr. Stevens was a 
Republican, a member of the Methodist Church, the 
Masonic lodge, and was a Knights Templar. 

Douglas F. Stevens attended the public schools of 
Evanston, Illinois, and spent three years at Northwestern 
University. He was graduated from Cornell University 
in 1907 with the degree of Mechanical Engineer. He im- 
mediately became identified with his father's brick manu- 
facturing business as assistant superintendent. In 1908 
he was made superintendent and at the time of his father's 
death in 1914 was elected secretary and general manager. 
Mr. Stevens removed to Danville in 1910. He became vice 
president and general manager of the company in 1919, 
and established offices at Danville. 

In 1908 Mr. Stevens married Miss Ida Harriet King, 
the daughter of John F. and Emma L. (Brown) King, the 
former a native of Germany and the latter of New York 
City. Mr. King died in 1928 and his widow lives at Dan- 
ville. He was well known in this city as an insurance man. 



588 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stevens have been born two sons: Robert 
Putnam, born November 6, 1912; and Donald King, born 
October 26, 1920. 

Mr. Stevens is a Republican; a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church; Rotary Club; Masonic Lodge, thirty- 
second degree, and Knights Templar; and Walnut Hill 
Boat Club. He is secretary and former president of the 
National Brick Manufacturers Association. He was for- 
merly president of the Illinois Clay Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation and the Danville Choral Society, and has been an 
officer of the American Face Brick Association, and Amer- 
ican Ceramic Society. 

Douglas F. Stevens is a direct descendant of John 
Stevens, who settled at Chelmsford, Massachusetts, in 
1654, coming from County Sussex, England. He was a 
prominent figure in Massachusetts and became an officer 
in the Army. Samuel Stevens, great-great-great-grand- 
father of Douglas F. Stevens, was a lieutenant in the Con- 
tinental Army and served at the battle of Concord. He 
is buried at Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 



The Acme Brick Company, of Danville, Illinois, was 
organized in 1906 by Charles P. Stevens and Charles N. 
Stevens, with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars. The 
original officers were: Charles P. Stevens, president; A. 
F. Carlson, vice president; and Charles N. Stevens, secre- 
tary and treasurer. In the beginning the company manu- 
factured face brick exclusively and employed approxi- 
mately thirty men. 

In 1922 the capital stock of the Acme Brick Company 
was increased to one hundred fifty thousand dollars. The 
company had begun the manufacture of floor tile in 1913 
and began the manufacture of roof tile in 1927. Face brick, 
however, is the chief output. The company also has pat- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 589 

ents on a special texture called "Persiantex," invented in 
1926. 

The officers of the Acme Brick Company in 1929 are: 
Charles N. Stevens, president and treasurer; Douglas F. 
Stevens, vice president and general manager; Ethel M. 
King, secretary; and George R. Johnson, superintendent. 
The company's offices are located at Danville, and the plant 
at Cayuga, Indiana. 



Leo W. Burk. — Among the younger men prominent in 
the professional and social life of Danville, one of the most 
outstanding is Leo W. Burk, attorney, with offices in the 
Daniel Building. He was born in Vermilion County, De- 
cember 4, 1898, the son of George and Mary E. (Rickard) 
Burk. 

George Burk was born at Higginsville, Vermilion 
County, in 1867. He was interested in general farming 
until 1903, when he removed to Danville, where he has 
since been well known as a cement contractor. He is a 
Republican, a member of the First Christian Church, 
Masonic Lodge, and Modern Woodmen of the World. Mr. 
Burk is the son of William and Mary Burk, natives of 
Indiana, and early settlers of Vermilion County. His wife, 
Mary E. (Rickard) Burk, was born in Vermilion County, 
the daughter of Jacob and Martha Rickard. Mr. Rickard 
died at Danville in 1914. His widow still lives in this city. 
To Mr. and Mrs. George Burk eight children were born, 
as follows: Leo W., the subject of this sketch; Raleigh 0., 
lives at Indianapolis, Indiana; Jewell V., attends the Kent 
College of Law; George, lives at Indianapolis; Paul B., 
Marvin D., Gene, and Virginia E., all students. 

Leo W. Burk, as a youth, attended the public schools 
of Danville and after his graduation from high school in 
1917 spent a year at the University of Illinois before his 



590 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

enlistment for service in the World War. He served as a 
member of the Three Hundred and Eighth Tank Corps 
and was stationed at Camp Polk, North Carolina, and later 
at Camp Green, South Carolina. He was discharged De- 
cember 31, 1918, and resumed his work at the University of 
Illinois, from which he was graduated in law in 1922. He 
was subsequently admitted to practice in the Federal 
courts and served as inheritance tax attorney under the 
Attorney General of the State of Illinois. 

In 1924 Mr. Burk married Miss Opal I. Ayres, the 
daughter of William E. and Oma (Butts) Ayres, of Mat- 
toon, Illinois. They have a daughter, Sheila Ann. 

Mr. Burk is a Republican, a member of the First Chris- 
tian Church, Furtherlight Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, No. 1130, Master; Gamma Eta Gamma 
fraternity; American Legion; Adelphic Literary Society; 
and University of Illinois Law Club. 



Harold Ferguson Lindley, who is associated in prac- 
tice with the law firm of Gunn, Penwell & Lindley, ranks 
among the successful attorneys of Danville. He was born 
at Mattoon, Illinois, April 3, 1888, the son of Charles and 
Zyphora (Ferguson) Lindley. 

Charles Lindley was born at Dublin, Wayne County, 
Indiana, and his wife was born on a farm south of Mat- 
toon, Illinois. He was employed by Alschuler & Company, 
wholesale and retail dry goods merchants, Mattoon. He 
died October 23, 1889, at the age of twenty-six years and 
is buried in Muddy Point Cemetery, Mattoon. Mr. Lind- 
ley was a Republican, a member of the Congregational 
Church, and Knights of Pythias. One child was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Lindley: Harold Ferguson, the subject of 
this sketch. Mrs. Zyphora Lindley married the second 
time to C. W. Sellen, and they had a daughter Martha, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 591 

the wife of Mark W. Eichelberger; they live in Chicago. 
Mrs. Sellen died August 13, 1920, and is buried at Mattoon, 
Illinois. 

Harold Ferguson Lindley attended the public schools 
of Mattoon and was graduated from high school in 1906. 
He also completed a course at the Mattoon Business Col- 
lege, and attended the University of Illinois during 1906- 
1908; graduated from the University of Chicago in 1910 
with the degree of Ph. B. ; and in 1912 was graduated from 
the Law School, University of Chicago, with the degree 
of J. D. After graduating in law Mr. Lindley practiced 
in Chicago for about three years. He then became asso- 
ciated with the law firm of Martin & Glenn at Murphys- 
boro, Illinois. He left that firm to return to Chicago, 
where he became general counsel, secretary, and a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Jewel Tea Company, 
Inc. He came to Danville in 1922 as a partner in the law 
firm of Gunn, Penwell & Lindley. They maintain offices 
in the Daniel Building. 

Mr. Lindley was married (first) November 22, 1916, to 
Miss Muriel Aken, a native of Elkville, Illinois, the daugh- 
ter of W. H. and Margaret (Cox) Aken, natives of Illinois. 
Mr. Aken lives at Elkville. His wife died November 13, 
1927. Muriel (Aken) Lindley died November 28, 1923, 
and is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. She left 
two daughters: Muriel Zyphora and Dorothy Aken, both 
students. On June 10, 1925, Mr. Lindley married Miss 
Gladys Brewer, daughter of G. L. and Hester (Woolsey) 
Brewer. He is deceased and his widow lives at Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Lindley have a son, Charles 
Brewer Lindley, born in 1926. 

Politically, Mr. Lindley is a Republican. He attends 
the Presbyterian Church, and is affiliated with the Masonic 
Lodge, Elks Club, Knights of Pythias, Sigma Chi fra- 
ternity, and Danville Country Club. He is a member of 
the Board of Education and a member of the Board of 



592 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Trustees, Lakeview Hospital, Danville. He is also secre- 
tary of the Vermilion County Central Republican Com- 
mittee. 



Larkin A. Tuggle is widely known throughout Ver- 
milion County as the capable superintendent of schools. He 
was identified with the city school system of Danville for 
a number of years before accepting his present position 
in 1923. Mr. Tuggle was born at Indianola, Illinois, July 
29, 1875, the son of James M. and Laura F. (Hansbrough) 
Tuggle. 

James M. Tuggle was born in Union County, W. Va., 
and his wife was a native of Indianola, Illinois. He was a 
minister of the United Brethren Church for thirty-five 
years and was identified with the upper Wabash Confer- 
ence. His father settled at Fairmount, Illinois, in 1854 
and enlisted in the Seventy-third Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try in 1861. He died in service December 24, 1861, at 
Nashville, Tenn. James M. Tuggle died Nov. 11, 1921, 
and his wife died December 13, 1928. Both are buried at 
Veedersburg, Ind. Their children were: Carrie Ward, 
lives at Owasa, Iowa; Orrie M., lives at Morocco, Indiana; 
Halsie, lives at Los Angeles, California; William, lives at 
Danville; Benjamin F. and Calvin, both deceased; Thersia 
Storm, lives at Veedersburg, Indiana ; James, Mary Hulli- 
han, and June, all deceased; Clifford, lives at Lexington, 
Missouri; and Larkin A., the subject of this sketch. 

Larkin A. Tuggle spent his boyhood on a farm and at- 
tended the district schools of Illinois and Indiana. He was 
graduated from Battleground High School and attended 
Westfield (Illinois) College. Mr. Tuggle began his teach- 
ing career as a country school teacher and after six years 
was appointed principal of Lincoln School, Danville, in 
which capacity he served for seven years. He then was su- 
pervisor of manual training in the Danville schools for a 







* 

~ 


- 


^ " 


^ 


' 




\ 














r i 




^^ 




* 


» « 






® 
















• K^^nX^ 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 593 

period of eleven years and in 1923 became county superin- 
tendent of schools. 

On July 28, 1901, Mr. Tuggle was united in marriage 
with Miss Sadie E. Martin, of Georgetown, Illinois, the 
daughter of Dr. Franklin and Amanda (Hewitt) Martin. 
Dr. Franklin Martin, deceased, was descended from one of 
the first families of Vermilion County. His grandfather 
Henry Martin was one of the two sons-in-law of Achilles 
Morgan, who settled on the Vermilion River, east of West- 
ville, in 1825. Achilles Morgan, with his two sons-in-law, 
Henry Martin and George Brock, came to the salt works 
west of Danville in 1821. Mrs. Amanda (Hewitt) Martin 
Bennett is now a widow and lives at Georgetown, Illinois. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Tuggle the following children have been 
born: Thelma, married Dan Stratman, lives at Danville; 
Gordon, deceased; Edith, Pauline, Floyd, Berlin, Eleanor, 
Lucile, Christine, and Peggy Jean, all at home. 

Mr. Tuggle has always been a Republican. He is a 
member of the First United Brethren Church, Danville, 
and is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, Loyal Order 
of Moose, Improved Order of Red Men, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, Disabled American Veterans of the World War, and 
other lodge auxiliaries. 

Mr. Tuggle has had a long and adventurous military 
career. He joined the Fifth Illinois National Guard as a 
private in Company I, May 16, 1905, at Danville. He was 
promoted to corporal on June 17, 1906; became quarter- 
master sergeant on September 14, 1906; second lieutenant 
on November 17, 1908; and was promoted to captain on 
August 5, 1910, which rank he held until the close of the 
World war. For seven years he was inspector of rifle 
practice of the Fifth Illinois Infantry, and during that 
time was state team coach for two years of the Illinois 
National Guard State Rifle Team, which took part in the 
National Rifle and Pistol Competitions, conducted by the 

4— Vol. 2 



594 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

War Department at Camp Perry, Ohio, and Jacksonville, 
Florida. He was also range officer for the rifle ranges at 
Georgetown, Peoria, and Springfield and trained thou- 
sands of national guardsmen in the use and art of rifle and 
pistol firing. He won many state and national matches, 
winning the highest rank in both rifle and pistol, that of 
Expert Rifleman and Expert Pistolman. He represented 
General Headquarters of the American Expeditionary 
Forces at LeMans, France, in May, 1919, at the National 
A. E. F. Rifle and Pistol matches. 

Mr. Tuggle was assigned as Company Commander of 
Company E, Fifth Infantry, at Hillsboro, Illinois, on Feb- 
ruary 1, 1917, and was called into active service March 26, 
1917, and sent to Cairo and Thebes, Illinois, where he 
guarded bridges across the Ohio and Mississippi rivers un- 
til August 15, 1917. He was then sent to Houston, Texas, 
where the "Prairie Division" or Thirty-third Division was 
mobilized and organized for war training. Company E 
arrived in Houston about August 20, 1917, and Mr. Tuggle 
being senior line officer was placed in command of the 
camp until the arrival of General Bell. In the interim the 
24th United States Infantry (colored) broke out in 
riot and killed twenty-three people and wounded fifty- 
seven men, women and children. Mr. Tuggle got his Illi- 
nois troops in action and quelled the riot before midnight, 
capturing one hundred and seventy-five of the rioting sol- 
diers. Houstonians gave Mr. Tuggle credit for "saving the 
city of Houston." Throughout the investigations and trials 
in this case not one word of criticism was ever offered by 
the War Department concerning the handling of the situa- 
tion by Mr. Tuggle. Nineteen of the rioters were hanged, 
and forty-three were given life sentences in the peniten- 
tiary. 

Mr. Tuggle served for two years and four months in 
the World War, fourteen months of which were spent in 
France. He attended the Officers Training School at Fort 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 595 

Sill, Oklahoma, in the fall of 1917, and was made an in- 
structor. He saw front line trench service in France while 
in command of the One Hundred and Twenty-second Ma- 
chine Gun Battalion, Thirty-third Division, for two months 
of continuous fighting in the Somme River Sector, east of 
Amiens. He was then assigned to the First Army Head- 
quarters in G I and joined them at Chateau Thierry in 
August, 1918. After the armistice he was town major for 
six months near Chaumont, Headquarters American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Later he was District Commander at 
Chalons-sur-Marne, and his last service was at Dijon, 
France, in May and June, 1919. 

Mr. Tuggle is State Department Commander of the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, with head- 
quarters at Danville, and he is also second junior vice com- 
mander of Illinois of the Disabled American Veterans of 
the World War. He is also in command of the Military De- 
partment of the Supreme Lodge of Knights of Pythias, 
with headquarters in Danville. In 1929 he was appointed 
by Governor Lewis L. Emerson, one of the five members 
of the Advisory Board of the Department of Public Wel- 
fare, State of Illinois, as representative of the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars. 



Walter T. Gunn, of Gunn, Penwell & Lindley, attor- 
neys, Danville, is widely known throughout Vermilion 
County, where he has successfully engaged in practice for 
a period of almost thirty years. He was born at La Salle, 
Illinois, June 4, 1879, the son of Luther V. and Alice E. 
(Rogers) Gunn. 

Luther V. Gunn was born in New York, November 20, 
1856. He attended the common schools until he was four- 
teen years of age and then worked on a farm in La Salle 
County, Illinois, for seven years. He came to Vermilion 



596 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

County in 1880 and purchased a tract of land here, which 
he farmed for a number of years. Mr. Gunn now lives 
retired at Hoopeston, Illinois. His wife died in 1915. The 
following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gunn : Wal- 
ter T., lives at Danville; Roger F., lives at Rensselaer, 
Indiana; Robert L., Jennie, Letha A., Myra, all live at 
Hoopeston; Jessie, deceased; and Walter T., the subject 
of this sketch. 

Walter T. Gunn received his education in the public 
schools of Hoopeston, Illinois, and attended Green College. 
He was graduated from the Law School, Illinois Wesleyan 
University, in 1901 and during that year was admitted to 
practice at the Illinois bar. He engaged in practice alone 
for one year at Danville and then was associated with 
J. W. Keeslar. Mr. Gunn went to California in 1911 and 
spent three years in practice at Los Angeles, after which 
he returned to Danville and formed the partnership of 
Gunn & Piatt. The present firm of Gunn, Penwell & Lind- 
ley has been in existence since 1922. They have offices in 
the Daniel Building. 

Mr. Gunn was married in 1904 to Miss Vina Dayton, 
of Santa Barbara, California, the daughter of W. H. and 
Sarah (Gundy) Dayton, natives of Vermilion County. Mr. 
Dayton died in 1919. His widow lives at Danville. Two 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gunn: Horace, at- 
torney, 231 South La Salle Street, Chicago, is a graduate 
of the University of Illinois; and Marjorie, who attends 
the University of Illinois. 

Mr. Gunn is a Republican in politics. He served as 
assistant state's attorney in Vermilion County from 1902 
until 1908; in 1909 was elected alderman of the Seventh 
Ward, Danville; in 1906 was Master in Chancery, United 
States Circuit Court, and served until 1912; and from 
1915 until 1919 was corporation counsel for the city of 
Danville. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 597 

Mr. Gunn is affiliated with the Elks Club, and Masonic 
lodge, thirty-second degree. He is identified with the Ver- 
milion County Bar Association, Illinois Bar Association, 
and American Bar Association. He also belongs to the 
Danville Country Club. 

Luther V. Gunn was the son of Luther and Lydia 
(Gage) Gunn, natives of New York. 



Vfilliam G. Hartshorn. — Outstanding among the citi- 
zens of Danville, both for his business ability and for his 
public-spirited concern in the affairs of the community, 
was William G. Hartshorn, who died November 18, 1926. 
He was born at Corydon, Iowa, January 17, 1860, the son 
of William G. and Mary Ann (Thompson) Hartshorn. 

William G. Hartshorn was a native of Dublin, Ireland. 
Early in life he went to Liverpool, England, where he was 
identified with one of the largest iron merchants as book- 
keeper and traveling salesman. After coming to this 
country he accepted a position as bookkeeper in St. Louis 
and later went to Keokuk, Iowa, and worked at the same 
occupation. After his health failed he went to Corydon, 
Iowa, where he published the first Republican newspaper, 
which was known as the Corydon "Monitor." He was 
elected United States Senator on the Republican ticket 
but died the same year, 1867. His wife, who was born in 
London, England, died March 10, 1903. Both are buried 
at Corydon, Iowa. They had five children: Mrs. Kate 
H. Hayes, born May 6, 1859, lives at Danville ; William G., 
the subject of this sketch; John G., born May 17, 1862, 
lives at Danville; Mrs. C. W. Martindale, born January 25, 
1864, lives at Fargo, North Dakota; and Mrs. M. J. Elrod, 
born March 5, 1866, lives at Missoula, Montana. 

William G. Hartshorn received his education in the 
schools of Corydon, Iowa. After leaving school he found 



598 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

his first employment as a clerk in a hardware store. He 
became actively identified with the coal business with R. 
R. and J. G. Hammond about 1894 in Iowa. In 1895 he 
came to Danville as president and general manager of 
the Economy Coal Company. He later organized and 
opened a mine to be known as the Electric Coal Company 
in 1903. In 1911 Mr. Hartshorn had designed and built 
the first successful stripping shovel in the world. He then 
organized several other stripping companies, all of which 
were highly successful. 

In April, 1891, Mr. Hartshorn married Miss Myrtle 
Prentice, of Pleasantville, Iowa, the daughter of Thomas 
Jefferson and Sophronia (Jordon) Prentice, the former a 
native of Ohio and the latter of Iowa. Mr. Prentice died 
in 1893. His widow lives at Long Beach, California. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Hartshorn was born a son, William G., Jr. 
He is a well known coal operator of Danville. 

Mr. Hartshorn was a Republican, and a member of the 
Elks Club and Kiwanis Club. 

Mr. Hartshorn was chairman of the County Red Cross 
during the World War in 1917 and 1918 and took a very 
active interest in that work. 



The Equitable Building & Loan Association is one of 

the oldest and most substantial institutions of its kind in 
Vermilion County. It was organized in Danville in 1880 
by Asa Partlow, and was capitalized at that time for 
$50,000. 

The first officers of the company were : W. P. Cannon, 
president; and Asa Partlow, secretary. In 1885 Edwin R. 
Partlow became secretary, and continued in that capacity 
until his death, February 27, 1928. He was succeeded in 
that office by F. E. Partlow. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 599 

The officers for 1929 are, as follows : George M. Wright, 
president; F. E. Partlow, secretary; and C. V. McClena- 
than, treasurer. The directors are: Frank L. Hill, C. V. 
McClenathan, A. A. Partlow, F. E. Partlow, A. R. Samuel, 
W. L. Syrcle, and George M. Wright. 

The statement as of February 28, 1929, follows: As- 
sets: Loans on Real Estate, $3,195,875.53; Stock Loans, 
$65,753.62; Real Estate and Costs, $73,909.00; Taxes Ad- 
vanced, $1,578.02; Furniture and Fixtures, $2,500.00; In- 
terest in Arrears, $13,802.04; Cash in Bank, $171,860.37; 
Total, $3,525,278.58. Liabilities: Installments paid on 
Stock, $3,012,191.34; Dividends Credited on Stock, $486,- 
587.24; Contingent Fund, $21,500.00; Undivided Profits, 
$5,000.00. Total, $3,525,278.58. 



Edwin Reuben Partlow. — One of the most progressive 
and best known business men of Danville was Edwin 
Reuben Partlow, who died February 27, 1928. He was 
identified with the Equitable Building & Loan Association 
throughout his entire business career and served as sec- 
retary from 1885 until the time of this death in 1928. 

Mr. Partlow was born in Danville, February 6, 1867, 
the son of Asa and Mary (Murdock) Partlow. Asa Part- 
low was the founder of the Peoples Building Association 
in 1870, and in 1880 he organized the Equitable Building 
& Loan Association. He served as secretary until 1885 
and was succeeded at that time to the office by his son, 
Edwin Reuben Partlow. 

The education of Edwin Reuben Partlow was received 
in the public schools of Danville and following his gradua- 
tion from Danville High School in 1885 he immediately 
accepted the office of secretary of the Equitable Building 
& Loan Association. 



600 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mr. Partlow was married on September 19, 1893, to 
Miss Lorene Fanson. They had a daughter, Edna M. 
Syrcle, who lives in Danville. 

Mr. Partlow held membership in St. James Methodist 
Church, of which he was a trustee, and he was affiliated 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; 
Knights of Pythias; Olive Branch Lodge No. 38, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty- 
second degree; and Rotary Club. He was president of the 
Illinois League of Building Associations and for seven 
years was Illinois representative on the executive com- 
mittee of the United States League of Building Associa- 
tions. 



John F. Fisher, civil engineer, with offices in the Dale 
Building, ranks among the prominent citizens of Danville. 
He was born near Indianola, Vermilion County, April 24, 
1865, the son of Michael and Maryetta (Baum) Fisher. 

Michael Fisher was born near Indianola, Vermilion 
County, in November, 1835, and died January 10, 1923. 
He was a graduate of Georgetown Seminary and taught 
school in Vermilion County. Later, he farmed near Em- 
poria, Kansas, and from there went to Missouri, and set- 
tled near Springfield, where he again taught school. Upon 
his return to Indianola, Illinois, he was married June 30, 
1864, to Maryetta Baum, who was born there, in Febru- 
ary, 1845. She now resides at Sidell, Illinois. Mr. Fisher 
became interested in the nursery business and was the 
owner of fine orchards. He also owned and operated a 
hardware business from 1878 until 1904, at which time he 
retired. He was a Democrat and for several years served 
as justice of the peace. His wife held membership in the 
Methodist Church and he was a member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Fisher is buried in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, Indianola. The children born to Mr. and 




JOHN P. FISHER 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 601 

Mrs. Fisher were: John F., the subject of this sketch; 
Maude, the widow of Joseph J. Sidell, lives at Sidell, Illi- 
nois; and Eva, married Harvey Sconce, lives at Sidell. 

Michael Fisher was the son of David P. and Jane 
(Weaver) Fisher. He was born in Brown County, Ohio, 
in 1809, and his wife was born in Clairmont County, 
Ohio, in 1813. He died in August, 1881, and she died in 
July, 1907. Both are buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, In- 
dianola, Illinois. Their marriage took place in 1834. He 
had settled at Indianola in 1833, where he became success- 
ful as a farmer and stock raiser. Jane (Weaver) Fisher 
was the daughter of Michael and Mary (Spessard) 
Weaver. He was born at Hagerstown, Maryland, August 
18, 1775, and his wife was a native of Pennsylvania, of 
German descent. In 1875 Michael Weaver celebrated his 
100th birthday anniversary. He died in October of that 
year and is buried in Weaver Cemetery. He had settled 
near Indianola about 1828 and became a farmer. He 
served in the War of 1812. 

Maryetta (Baum) Fisher is the daughter of Dr. 
John W. and Harriet (Wendel) Baum, the former a na- 
tive of Ohio and the latter of Indiana. He died in 1854 
and she died in 1889. Both are buried in Illinois. 

John F. Fisher received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of Indianola. He was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1890 with the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science and Civil Engineering. After leaving college he 
went to Chicago and was employed in the engineering de- 
partment of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 
Later, he went with the Illinois Central Railroad, and 
finally was associated with W. L. Stebbings, consulting en- 
gineer, Chicago. In 1900 Mr. Fisher went to the Indian 
Territory, now Oklahoma, and served as engineer for the 
Interior Department of the United States Government, 
laying out town sites. This work was completed in De- 



602 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

cember, 1904, and Mr. Fisher then came to Danville, where 
he established private offices. 

In 1900 Mr. Fisher married Miss Maude Songer, 
daughter of W. W. and Elsie Ellen (Shore) Songer. A 
sketch of W. W. Songer appears elsewhere in this history 
in the biography of Robert C. Songer. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher 
have a daughter, Georgia, who is a graduate of Danville 
High School and the University of Arizona. She was also 
a student at the Alameda County Hospital, Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, and is now dietitian at Good Samaritan Hospital, 
Phoenix, Arizona. 

Mr. Fisher is a Republican and held the office of col- 
lector of Carroll Township, Vermilion County, in 1895-96. 
He is a member of the Methodist Church, Modern Wood- 
men of America, and Illinois Society of Engineers. 



Richard H. Johnson. — Representative among the suc- 
cessful young men of Danville may be mentioned Richard 
H. Johnson, who is identified with Johnson's Printing 
House, 115 West Main Street. He is a native of this city, 
born August 20, 1895, the son of C. S. and Alma (Dillon) 
Johnson. 

C. S. Johnson was born at Richmond, Kentucky, in 
1862, the son of Richard Henderson and Susan (Goodwill) 
Johnson, the former a native of Lafayette, Indiana, and 
the latter of Kentucky. Mr. Johnson was a publisher and 
settled at Danville in 1866, where he was the founder of 
the old "Danville News" in 1872. He served as coroner 
of Vermilion County and was a leading citizen of his time. 
He died in 1911 and his wife died in 1910. They are 
buried in Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville. She was an 
ardent lover of flowers and it was in honor of her beautiful 
flower garden, "Rose Lawn," that the new residential sec- 
tion of Danville was named. The son of Richard Hender- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 603 

son Johnson was C. S., father of the subject of this sketch. 
When fourteen years of age he learned the printer's trade 
at Danville, having come to this city with his parents in 
1866. In 1895 Mr. Johnson established a job printing com- 
pany, and it ranks among the city's leading business 
houses. They specialize in job printing, office supplies, and 
manufacture rubber stamps. 

Mr. C. S. Johnson is a Republican, a member of the 
First Church of Christ, Masonic Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and Modern Woodmen of America. Alma 
(Dillon) Johnson was born at Georgetown, Illinois, in 1862. 
Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Johnson : Georgia 
Frances, lives at home; and Richard H., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Richard H. Johnson grew up in Danville and obtained 
his early schooling here, being a graduate of Danville High 
School in the class of 1915. He received the degree of 
Bachelor of Science at the University of Illinois in 1919. 
He volunteered for service during the World War and 
enlisted in the Ordnance Department, United States Army. 
He was stationed at Camp Hancock, later at Fort Sheri- 
dan, and finally at the Charleston General Ordnance Sup- 
ply Depot, South Carolina. He was discharged on March 
14, 1919. Following his graduation from college, Mr. John- 
son went to Chicago where he was associated with Butler 
Brothers, as buyer. Later, he was buyer for Sears Roe- 
buck Company. He returned to Danville in 1921 and has 
since been connected with the Johnson Printing House. 

In 1921 Mr. Johnson married Miss Dorothy Primm, the 
daughter of W. L. and Sarah E. (Webb) Primm, of Chi- 
cago, both now deceased. They have three children: 
Richard H., Jr., born in 1922; Hubert, born June 1, 1925; 
and Sarah Elizabeth, born September 1, 1928. 

Mr. Johnson is a Republican and in 1928 was elected 
supervisor of Danville Township. He is a member of the 
First Church of Christ, Masonic Lodge, Elks Club, Amer- 
ican Legion, and "40 and 8" Society. 



604 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

William I. Bowman. — One of the well known men of 
Danville is William I. Bowman, portrait artist and com- 
mercial photographer. He was born near Fairmount, Ver- 
milion County, February 17, 1889, the son of Isaac N. and 
Rachael Elizabeth (Current) Bowman. 

Isaac N. Bowman was born in Vermilion County, April 
30, 1861, the son of William and Mary (Wiggins) Bowman, 
the former a native of Manchester, England, and the lat- 
ter of Vermilion County. William Bowman was a phar- 
macist and came to the United States about 1855. He and 
his wife are buried in Leonard Cemetery, near Danville. 
Their son, Isaac N. Bowman, engaged in general farming 
in Vermilion County for more than twenty years and in 
1902 removed to Chanute, Kansas, where he owned and 
operated a farm until the time of his retirement in 1920. 
He is a Republican, a member of the United Brethren 
Church and Modern Woodmen of America. Rachael E. 
(Current) Bowman was born in Vermilion County, Decem- 
ber 8, 1865, the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth (Lynch) 
Current. Both were natives of Vermilion County, where 
Mr. Current engaged in farming. He lives retired at 
Danville. His wife is deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Isaac 
N. Bowman were born five children: William L, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Mary J., married Earl Wertz, lives 
at Chanute, Kansas ; Harry M., a World War veteran, lives 
at Danville; Ruth M., married Oscar McClarren, lives at 
Chanute; and George N., lives at Danville. 

William I. Bowman received his education in the public 
schools of Vermilion County and Chanute, Kansas. He 
also took a commercial course and at the same time studied 
photography. He began his business career in the Moore 
Studio, Chanute, Kansas. After coming to Danville in 
1909 he was associated with the studio of A. R. Campbell 
until 1914, when he purchased Mr. Campbell's interest in 
the business. In July, 1925, Mr. Bowman removed to his 
present location, 22 North Hazel Street. He specializes 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 605 

in high grade portrait work and has also been official 
photographer for the Chicago and Eastern Illinois Rail- 
road for the past fifteen years. 

April 20, 1913, Mr. Bowman married Lena Rader, the 
daughter of S. W. and Mary (Myers) Rader, of Marion, 
Indiana. He is chief engineer for the Western Brick Com- 
pany and now lives at Danville. Mr. and Mrs. Bowman 
are the parents of five children: William R., Gertrude, 
Dallas, and Robert, all students; and Herbert, born in 
1916, died in 1924, buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Dan- 
ville. 

Mr. Bowman holds membership in the First United 
Brethren Church, Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons No. 38; Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch 
Mason No. 182; Athlestan Commandery, Knight Templar 
No. 45; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Mo- 
hammed Temple; Loyal Order of Moose; Rotary Club; and 
Chamber of Commerce. He is a life member of the Am- 
ateur Trap Shooting Association, Vandalia, Ohio. 

Mr. Bowman is a Republican. 



John G. Hartshorn, retired, is numbered among the 
progressive men of Danville, where he has lived for more 
than thirty years. He was born at Corydon, Iowa, May 
17, 1862, the son of William G. and Mary Ann (Thompson) 
Hartshorn. 

William G. Hartshorn was a native of Dublin, Ireland. 
Early in life he went to Liverpool, England, where he was 
identified with one of the largest iron merchants as book- 
keeper and traveling salesman. After coming to this 
country he accepted a position as bookkeeper in St. Louis 
and later went to Keokuk, Iowa, and worked at the same 
occupation. After his health failed he went to Corydon, 
Iowa, where he published the first Republican newspaper, 



606 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

which was known as the Corydon "Monitor." He was 
elected United States Senator on the Republican ticket 
but died the same year, 1867. His wife, who was born in 
London, England, died March 10, 1903. Both are buried 
at Corydon, Iowa. They had five children: Mrs. Kate H. 
Hayes, born May 6, 1859, lives at Danville; William G., a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this history; John 
G., the subject of this sketch; Mrs. C. W. Martindale, born 
January 25, 1864, lives at Fargo, North Dakota; and Mrs. 
M. J. Elrod, born March 5, 1866, lives at Missoula, Montana. 

John G. Hartshorn attended the schools of Corydon, 
Iowa. After his graduation from high school he was em- 
ployed as a clerk in the dry goods store of B. F. Miles for 
three years. He then became associated in the general 
mercantile business with his brother, William G. Harts- 
horn, at Pleasanton, Iowa. Later, he conducted a coal 
business at Dunreath, Iowa, from 1887 until 1898. In the 
latter year the brothers came to Danville, where they pur- 
chased the Economy Mine, as well as numerous other 
mines in this section. They also operated mines in Ohio 
and Indiana. Their interests in southern Illinois were sold 
in September, 1928, to the Truax Traer Coal Company. In 
1922 the Hartshorn mining interests in and about Dan- 
ville were disposed of to the United Electric Coal Com- 
pany. Mr. Hartshorn maintains private offices in the 
Adams Building, Danville. His residence is at 1102 North 
Walnut Street. . 

On March 1, 1888, Mr. Hartshorn was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Minnie E. Shepherd, of Mt. Ayr, Iowa, 
the daughter of Joseph S. and Mary (Moore) Shepherd. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd are deceased and are buried 
at Keosauqua, Iowa. He was a publisher at Keosauqua 
and Mount Ayr, Iowa. To Mr. and Mrs. Hartshorn two 
children were born: Harry, died February 29, 1892; and 
Helen Carson, born May 6, 1897, lives at Danville. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 607 

Politically, Mr. Hartshorn is a Republican. He is af- 
filiated with the Elks Club, Loyal Order of Moose, Rotary 
Club, and Danville Country Club. He has served as presi- 
dent of the Board of Education, Danville, and as president 
of the Chamber of Commerce. He was chairman of the 
Vermilion County Centennial Association. 



Fred Bowman Penwell, of Danville, is recognized as 
one of the leading members of the Vermilion County bar. 
He was born in this city, September 2, 1878, the son of 
Frank W. and May (Bowman) Penwell. 

Frank W. Penwell, deceased, was a leading attorney of 
Vermilion County. He was born near South Bend, Indi- 
ana, and following his graduation from Saint Joseph's 
Academy and the University of Michigan Law School he 
engaged in practice at Shelbyville, Illinois. He came to 
Danville in 1873, where he formed a partnership with a Mr. 
Henry, the firm being known as Henry & Penwell. In 
1880 Mr. Penwell became associated with Frank Lindley, 
and that partnership continued until the retirement of 
Mr. Penwell in 1907. He died June 19, 1920, and is buried 
in Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville. His widow, born in 
New York, lives at Danville. Their children were: Fred 
Bowman, the subject of this sketch; Jeanette, married Dr. 
A. M. Miller, lives at Danville; and Edward E., lives at 
Danville. 

The early education of Fred Bowman Penwell was re- 
ceived in the public schools of Danville. He attended 
Michigan Military Academy and in 1905 was graduated 
from the Law School of the University of Illinois. Mr. 
Penwell's first experience in legal work had come when he 
was employed as a clerk in the offices of Penwell & Lindley, 
of which his father was the senior member. 



608 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

After his father's retirement a reorganization of the 
firm in 1907 took place, and became known as Lindley, 
Penwell & Lindley, Frank Lindley being the senior mem- 
ber of the firm. At that time Walter C. Lindley, now 
United States Judge, also became a member of the firm, 
and the firm continued as Lindley, Penwell & Lindley until 
October, 1922, when Walter C. Lindley was appointed to 
the Federal Bench. 

The firm was then again reorganized, Mr. Walter T. 
Gunn becoming the senior member, and Harold F. Lindley, 
of Chicago, becoming associated as a partner. 

The firm is now known as Gunn, Penwell & Lindley, 
with offices in the Daniel Building. 

Politically, Mr. Penwell is a Republican. He is affiliated 
with Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, No. 38; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; Sigma 
Chi fraternity; Danville Country Club; Union League 
Club of Chicago; and Chamber of Commerce. He is also 
identified with the Vermilion County Bar Association, Illi- 
nois State Bar Association, and American Bar Association. 



Howard A. Swallow, who is identified with the firm of 
Swallow & Bookwalter, with offices in the First National 
Bank Building, Danville, is one of the leading members of 
the Vermilion County bar. He was born at Danville, 
August 18, 1878, the son of Charles M. and Clara (North- 
up) Swallow. 

Charles M. Swallow was a native of Pennsylvania. He 
came to Danville in 1871 and the following year was gradu- 
ated from the University of Michigan. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1872 and engaged in the practice of law at 
Danville continuously from that time until his retirement 
in 1899. Mr. Swallow married Miss Clara Northup, of 




HOWARD A. SWALLOW 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 609 

Clark Summit, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania. She 
died February 7, 1879. Howard A., the subject of this 
sketch, was their only child. 

The early schooling of Howard A. Swallow was re- 
ceived in the schools of Danville. He was graduated from 
Keystone Academy, Factoryville, Pennsylvania, in 1896, 
and four years later from Brown University with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1902 he was graduated from 
the Law School of Columbian University, Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia. Mr. Swallow established offices at Dan- 
ville in 1902, where he has since engaged in practice. From 
1911 until 1915 he served as corporation counsel for the 
city of Danville, and from 1915 until 1921 was master In 
chancery. He is prominent in the business life of the city, 
being president of the United Electric Coal Companies and 
Danville Building Association, and director in the follow- 
ing companies : Electric Coal Company of Chicago ; Dan- 
ville Building Association; Western Indiana Gravel Com- 
pany; United Electric Coal Companies and Illinois Electric 
Limestone Company. 

Mr. Swallow married May 29, 1905, Miss Grace Mar- 
garet Hamilton, at Providence, Rhode Island. They have 
two children, Richard Hamilton and Barbara Northup. 

Mr. Swallow holds membership in the Masonic and Elk 
lodges, Sigma Chi fraternity, Knights of Pythias, Loyal 
Order of Moose, Modern Woodmen of America, Brown 
Club of New York, and Union League Club of Chicago, and 
Medinah Athletic Club of Chicago. 



Otto W. Longenecker, lawyer and present assistant 
state's attorney, is among the prominent Republicans of 
Danville and Vermilion County. He was born in Lawrence 
County, Illinois, March 12, 1883, the son of Samuel A. and 
Elvessa (Warner) Longenecker. 

5— Vol. 2 



610 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Samuel A. Longenecker, retired, was born in Craw- 
ford County, Illinois, in 1852, the son of Benjamin F. and 
Lydia (Buzzard) Longenecker, who were natives of Lan- 
caster County, Pennsylvania, and early settlers of Illinois. 
He is buried in Ward Cemetery, Shelby County, Illinois, 
and his wife is buried in Charlottsville Cemetery, Law- 
rence County, Illinois. Their son, Samuel A. Longenecker, 
spent his early boyhood on his father's farm and through- 
out his active career engaged in farming in Lawrence 
County, Illinois, where he now lives retired. He is a Re- 
publican and has served as school director, commissioner 
and road supervisor. He holds membership in the Meth- 
odist Church. Elvessa (Warner) Longenecker was born 
in Lawrence County, Illinois, and died in 1921. She is 
buried in Lawrenceville Cemetery, Lawrenceville. She 
was the daughter of John W. and Harriet (Goffe) Warner, 
natives of Virginia and Illinois, respectively. Both are 
deceased and are buried in Charlottsville Cemetery, Law- 
rence County, Illinois. To Samuel A. and Elvessa (Warner) 
Longenecker were born four children: Minnie M., mar- 
ried J. Herman Highsmith, lives at Lawrenceville, Illinois; 
Roscoe C, who died in 1909; Otto W., the subject of this 
sketch; and Lena I., lives at home. 

Otto W. Longenecker grew up in a rural locality and 
attended the country schools. He attended Central Nor- 
mal College, Danville, Indiana; Austin College, Effingham, 
Illinois; Illinois Wesleyan College; and graduated from the 
Bloomington Law School in 1909 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. In that year Mr. Longenecker was 
admitted to practice at the Illinois bar and in 1910 engaged 
in practice at Bridgeport, Illinois. Later, he purchased 
an interest in an abstract firm at Lawrenceville, Illinois, 
and also established law offices at that place. From 1914 
until 1918 he served as county judge of Lawrence County, 
and in the latter year removed to Danville, where he be- 
came associated with the Vermilion Abstract Company. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 611 

From 1920 until 1924 he served as state's attorney for 
Lawrence County, and in January, 1925, became assistant 
state's attorney for Vermilion County. 

In 1910 Mr. Longenecker married Martha May Miles, 
daughter of John W. and Mary (Burcelle) Miles, the for- 
mer a native of Lawrence County, and the latter of Craw- 
ford County, Illinois. He died in May, 1928, and she died 
in 1924. Both are buried at Charlottsville, Illinois. He 
was a farmer and a prominent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Mr. and Mrs. Longenecker have a son, 
Hal A., born in 1912. He attends Oakwood High School. 

Mr. Longenecker is a member of Saint James Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and is affiliated with Edward Dobbins 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, No. 164, Law- 
renceville; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
No. 332; Court of Honor; Modern Woodmen of America; 
Vermilion County Bar Association; Illinois State Bar 
Association ; and American Bar Association. 



Roscoe Simpson Fairchild is among the well known and 
highly esteemed men of Danville, where he is secretary of 
the Danville Benefit & Building Association. He was born 
on a farm ten miles northwest of Danville in the Fair- 
child neighborhood, May 12, 1878, the son of Harrison and 
Sarah E. (Lanham) Fairchild. 

Harrison Fairchild was born near Danville, December 
25, 1840, the son of Daniel and Lucy (Hemenway) Fair- 
child. Daniel Fairchild was a pioneer Methodist circuit 
rider. His son, Harrison, became a progressive and suc- 
cessful farmer, who was interested in educating a family 
of twelve children. He spent four years in service during 
the Civil War as a member of Company B, Twenty-fifth 
Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was an active 
churchman, being a member of the Methodist Episcopal 



612 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Church. Mr. Fairchild died February 14, 1917, and his 
wife, born at Jamesburg, Illinois, September 11, 1845, died 
December 28, 1904. Both are buried in Springhill Cem- 
etery, Danville. Their children were: Rev. W. D., area 
secretary of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Chicago, Illi- 
nois; Mrs. Lillie Jane Crawford, lives at Detroit, Michigan; 
Mrs. Effie Bennett, lives at Hammond, Indiana; Oscar H., 
chemical and mining engineer, lives at Chicago, Illinois; 
John L., farmer, lives at Danville ; Mrs. Ethel Church, lives 
at Elkhart, Indiana; Mrs. Bessie Coil, lives at Ida Grove, 
Iowa; Mrs. Ruby Johnson, lives at Danville; Harry V., 
mining engineer, lives at Leadville, Colorado; Albert K., 
farmer, Ida Grove, Iowa; and Roscoe Simpson, the subject 
of this sketch. 

Roscoe Simpson Fairchild spent his boyhood on a farm 
ten miles northwest of Danville. Following his graduation 
from Danville High School in 1899 he taught school. He 
became principal of Roselawn School before entering the 
University of Chicago, from which he was graduated in 
1907. He had studied in the department of philosophy and 
divinity and entered the ministry of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church in Colorado in 1908 after spending one year 
in business training in the Otero County Bank at Ordway, 
Colorado. Mr. Fairchild felt that this business training 
was helpful in conducting the affairs of his church and 
also that this western experience would give him a liberal 
view as a minister. Among the churches served by him 
were: Durango, Colorado, from which church he came to 
Rantoul, Illinois, in 1915; other churches served in Illinois 
were Casey, Farmer City, and Beardstown. He was the 
son-in-law of M. J. Wolf ord and upon the death of his son, 
Harold Wolf ord, Mr. Fairchild was asked to come to Dan- 
ville and take up work in connection with the Danville 
Benefit & Building Association. Soon after the death of 
Mr. Wolford in 1928 he was elected secretary of this asso- 
ciation in 1929. This association is one of the oldest and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 613 

largest in Illinois. Mr. Fairchild believed in accepting this 
office that all work done well contributes to the welfare of 
humanity, even though it be in the field of business. He 
is also interested in music and has sung leading parts in 
several operas with the Danville Choral Society. He is a 
graduate of the Gottschalk School of Music, Chicago. 

June 4, 1913, Mr. Fairchild married Miss Sara Wolford, 
of Danville, the daughter of Milton J. and Maude (Black- 
well) Wolford, the former a native of Pennsylvania and 
the latter of North Carolina. He died May 28, 1928, and 
his widow lives at Wolford Hotel, Danville. Mrs. Fair- 
child is a graduate of Danville High School, class of 1900, 
and spent three years at the Art Institute, Chicago, where 
she received honorable mention for her work. She at- 
tended the University of Illinois, and was graduated from 
the Loring School for Girls in Chicago. She is a talented 
pianist. Mr. and Mrs. Fairchild have two sons: Roscoe 
Wolford, born June 18, 1917; and Harold Blackwell, born 
March 27, 1921. 

Mr. Fairchild is a Republican but has never sought 
public office. He holds membership in Saint James Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, and his wife is a teacher in the 
Sunday School. He is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge, 
thirty-second degree. During the Spanish-American War 
he served as a corporal in Battery A, Illinois Light Artil- 
lery, and participated in the Porto Rican campaign. 



The Danville Benefit & Building Association is among 
the oldest and most dependable business institutions of 
Vermilion County. It was chartered on June 12, 1874, with 
a capital stock of five hundred thousand dollars. It was 
subsequently increased to five million dollars; later in- 
creased to fifteen million dollars; and finally increased to 
thirty million dollars. The business was begun in the office 



614 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

of the J. G. Holden Lumber Company at the corner of 
Hazel and Van Buren streets. J. G. Holden was president, 
and Seth Steward became secretary. 

The business was later located in the office of L. T. and 
C. J. Palmer in the basement of the Old First National 
Bank Building, with M. J. Wolford as secretary. When 
the Palmer National Bank was established they removed 
to the rear room of this bank, later to the adjoining room, 
where it was improved and rebuilt. The present beautiful 
quarters of the company are the result of the remarkable 
growth of the institution. 

M. J. Wolford served in the capacity of secretary of the 
Danville Benefit & Building Association continuously from 
two years after its organization until his death, May 28, 
1928. Present assets amount to an excess of eight million 
dollars. The present officers are: C. U. Feldkamp, presi- 
dent; J. T. McMillan, vice president; R. S. Fairchild, secre- 
tary; J. E. Walker, treasurer; and W. Brewer, attorney. 
C. U. Feldkamp and J. T. McMillan make up the advisory 
committee. The directors are: C. U. Feldkamp, C. K. 
Palmer, C. F. Shane, J. A. Cathcart, W. C. Rankin, W. 
Brewer, R. S. Fairchild, J. W. Meitzler, J. T. McMillan, 
Thomas Conron, J. E. Walker, and C. H. Gones. 



William Y. Ludwig, who is serving as deputy county 
treasurer of Vermilion County, is one of the leading cit- 
izens of Danville. He was born at Amityville, Berks Coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, February 10, 1869, the son of William 
V. R. and Mary Y. (Jones) Ludwig. 

William V. R. Ludwig was born near Reading, Penn- 
sylvania, October 28, 1843. He clerked in a general store 
as a youth and later learned the miller's trade. In 1867 
he came west and settled near Pilot Grove, Vermilion 
County, on the California Ridge, where he farmed. Sub- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 615 

sequently he removed to Catlin, and in 1876 purchased a 
farm near Fithian, Illinois, where he spent the remainder 
of his life. He died January 19, 1918, and is buried in 
Stearns Cemetery, Fithian. His first wife, Mary Y. 
(Jones) Ludwig, was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, 
September 8, 1843, and died February 12, 1876. She is 
buried at Catlin, Illinois. To this union were born three 
children: William Y., the subject of this sketch; Charles 
J., born November 4, 1870, farmer, lives near Fithian, Illi- 
nois; and Rosa Imogene, born January 9, 1875, married 
Frank W. McCullough, lives at Wingate, Indiana. Mr. 
Ludwig was married second to Martha Ludwick, deceased. 
To them were born two daughters: Eva Ann, born 
August 16, 1879, married Lester Fellows, lives at Fithian, 
Illinois; and Deborah Margery, born September 15, 1881, 
died November 2, 1917. She was a school teacher. 

The boyhood of William Y. Ludwig was spent in Ver- 
milion County. He was graduated from Indiana Normal 
College in 1891 and began his teaching career in Vermilion 
County schools. He then taught in the schools of Buffalo 
County, Nebraska, for two years and upon his return to 
Vermilion County again resumed his teaching in the 
schools here for four years, after which he was appointed 
county superintendent. In that capacity he was in charge 
of two hundred and thirty-six schools, four hundred and 
thirty-seven teachers, and sixteen thousand pupils. He 
became assistant state superintendent of public schools at 
Springfield, Illinois, in 1911, and remained in that position 
until 1917. Mr. Ludwig went to Peoria, Illinois, in Jan- 
uary, 1919, with the Federal Baking Company as auditor. 
Early in 1921 he became trust officer for the American 
Bank & Trust Company of Danville. He resigned from 
that office in July, 1926. In 1926 he became deputy county 
treasurer, which office he still holds. 

Mr. Ludwig has always been a Republican. He holds 
membership in Saint James Methodist Episcopal Church, 



616 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and has the following lodge affiliations: Olive Branch 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, No. 38, Past 
Master; Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 82; 
Danville Council, Royal and Select Master Masons, No. 37, 
Past Thrice Illustrious Master; Athlestan Commandery, 
Knights Templar, No. 45, Past Commander; Danville Con- 
sistory, thirty-second degree; Past Thrice Potent Master, 
Lodge of Perfection; Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332; and Sons of the Revolution. 



Harlin Melville Steely was born one mile south of 
Hoopeston, in Grant Township, Vermilion County, No- 
vember 25, 1856. He is the son of George Steely and Han- 
nah (Hiser) Steely. George Steely was born in Fountain 
County, Indiana, September 6, 1830, and died August 15, 
1907. His wife, Hannah Hiser, was born in Kent Town- 
ship, Warren County, Indiana, February 16, 1836, and 
died September 11, 1892. They were married October 22, 
1854. Both are buried in Red Top Cemetery on the Dixie 
Highway two miles south of Hoopeston. Mr. Steely's 
grandfather, George Steely, was born in Mifflin County, 
Pennsylvania, May 20, 1778, died February 20, 1848, and 
he served as a soldier from Ohio under General Harrison at 
the battle of Tippecanoe on November 7, 1811, and in the 
War of 1812, he served as Lieutenant in Captain George 
Wolfe's company, in the Second Regiment of Ohio, com- 
manded by Colonel James Renick. He married, in Picka- 
way County, Ohio, November 24, 1811, Elizabeth Emerson, 
born November 16, 1791, and died February 10, 1853, 
daughter of Captain Thomas Emerson and Mary Downey 
Emerson, his wife, and to this couple twelve children were 
born, nine of whom reached manhood and womanhood, and 
married. 




^hn^.^Jl^, 




MARIAM M. MARQUESS STEKLY 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 617 

Their son, George Steely, was reared on a farm two 
miles north of Covington, Indiana. He was educated in 
the common schools of the county, and Indiana Asbury, 
now known as DePauw University, and enlisted as a sol- 
dier in the War with Mexico in 1847. Ten children were 
born to George Steely and Hannah (Hiser) Steely, his 
wife, to-wit: Harlin Melville Steely, born November 25, 
1856; William Wallace Steely, born October 11, 1858; 
Clara Isabel (Steely) Stone, born September 4, 1860, died 
May 30, 1902; Charles Steely, born January 14, 1863, died 
January 30, 1863; Zaidee (Steely) Phillips, born June 3, 
1864 ; George Steely, born May 12, 1867, died January 27, 
1869; Mark Antony Steely, born December 6, 1869; Earl 
Steely, born July 30, 1873, died September 10, 1873 ; Ger- 
trude Steely, born August 28, 1874, died January 11, 1875; 
an infant son, unnamed, born May 28, 1879, died May 29, 
1879. 

The great-grandparents of Mr. Steely were Gabriel 
Steely and Mary Steely, his wife, of Pickaway County, 
Ohio. Gabriel was born August 19, 1763, it is believed in 
North Carolina, and died May 2, 1830. He served as a pri- 
vate in Captain Jehiel Gregory's company in the Third 
Regiment of Ohio, in the War of 1812. His wife, Mary 
Steely, was born January 28, 1767, and died in Fountain 
County, Indiana, January 25, 1850, and Gabriel Steely was 
the son of Ulrich Steely, and Anna Steely, his wife, who 
died in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, in May, 1793. 

Harlin Melville Steely was raised on a farm, attended 
the rural school, and the high school at Hoopeston, and in 
1875 became a teacher, which profession he followed for 
seven years, and was principal of the high school at Poto- 
mac in the years 1878 and 1879. While teaching he read 
law, and on September 17, 1880, was admitted to the bar 
by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and began practice in 
the City of Hoopeston, and served ten years as City Attor- 
ney of that city, and in 1892 removed to Danville, and 



618 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

formed a co-partnership with William J. Calhoun, with 
offices in the First National Bank Building, where this 
partnership continued for eleven years. Mr. Steely still 
maintains his office in the same building and is associated 
in practice with his son, H. M. Steely, Jr. 

On August 25, 1878, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Mariam M. Marquess, the daughter of James F. and 
Sarah Ellen (McLean) Marquess. She was born at Rob 
Roy, Indiana, February 9, 1859. Mr. Marquess was born 
in Miami County, Ohio, March 23, 1834, and died in Foun- 
tain County, Indiana, October 12, 1894. He was married 
to Sarah Ellen McLean, April 25, 1858, and she was born 
January 7, 1842, and died in Grant Township, Vermilion 
County, Illinois, in 1867. To Mr. and Mrs. Steely were 
born three sons, Dr. George Steely, born September 30, 
1879, physician and surgeon, with offices in The Temple 
Building, Danville, who is a World War soldier, having 
served with the rank of captain; Robert Wallace Steely, 
born January 2, 1882, died August 29, 1903, who was a 
soldier in the Spanish-American War, and H. M. Steely, 
Jr., born July 16, 1884, who graduated from Yale Univer- 
sity in 1908, was admitted to the bar in Illinois in 1911, 
was enlisted, examined, and accepted at Camp Taylor, 
Kentucky, held up on account of the flu, and did not get to 
see service, and who is now associated in the practice of 
law with his father. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlin Melville Steely have two grand- 
children: Elizabeth and Roberta Steeley. They are chil- 
dren of H. M. Steely, Jr. His wife is Fern E. Hostettler, 
a native of Olney, Illinois, daughter of Prof. Henry W. 
and Stella (Shaw) Hostettler. Doctor George Steely mar- 
ried Edythe H. Nims, of Hinsdale, New Hampshire. Both 
of the daughters-in-law of Mr. Steely are members of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, and his two sons 
are members of the Sons of the Revolution. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 619 

Mr. Steely in politics is a Republican, attends the Chris- 
tian Church, of which his wife is a member. He is a mem- 
ber of Star Lodge, No. 709, A. F. and A. M. of Hoopeston, 
Illinois; Hoopeston Chapter R. A. M. No. 181; Mt. Olivet 
Commandery No. 38 K. T. ; Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks, No. 332 ; Sons of the Revolution ; Sons of the 
War of 1812, and Mrs. Steely is a member of the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution. 

The Revolutionary records of Mrs. Steely come from 
John McLean, Revolutionary soldier from Pennsylvania, 
and Sarah Armstrong, his wife, who died in Benton, Yates 
County, New York; William F. McLean, his son, who was 
a soldier in the War of 1812, and Sarah Woodhull, his wife ; 
Alexander Armstrong McLean and Mary Jane Potter, his 
wife; Sarah Ellen McLean and James Franklin Marquess, 
her husband, and the revolutionary record on her father's 
side is William Marquess, William Kidd Marquess, and 
Jane Trussel, his wife of Loudoun County, Virginia ; Wil- 
liam Kidd Marquess, Jr., who was a member of the Legis- 
lature in Indiana in the Session of 1850, from Fountain 
County, and Elizabeth Phillips, his wife, James F. Mar- 
quess and Sarah Ellen McLean, his wife. 

The Revolutionary records of Mr. Steely come from 
Colonel Alexander Lawson Smith, who served as a private 
in 1775, was appointed a captain by Congress, July 13, 
1776, became a major, a lieutenant colonel, and then a 
colonel, and who died in 1801, in Berkeley County, West 
Virginia, and Mary Smith, his wife; Hannah (Smith) 
Starry, their daughter, born October 25, 1778, married at 
Martinsburg, West Virginia, October 25, 1798, died War- 
ren County, Indiana, September 19, 1861; Daniel Starry, 
her husband, was born June 1, 1777 and died November 
29, 1842; Hannah (Starry) Hiser, born in Berkeley 
County, West Virginia, September 25, 1806, married in 
Warren County, Indiana, December 2, 1830, died Novem- 
ber 8, 1858, and Nicholas Hiser, her husband, born No- 



620 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

vember 1, 1800, died February 7, 1847; Hannah (Hiser) 
Steely, born February 16, 1836, married October 22, 1854, 
died September 11, 1892, and George Steely, her husband, 
born September 6, 1830, died August 15, 1907. The sec- 
ond record being Captain Thomas Emerson and Mary 
(Downey) Emerson, his wife, who was commissioned cap- 
tain or master of the sloop Lethe, September 5, 1782, a 
privateer, and who had previously served on the sloop 
Franklin, and had been captured and imprisoned by the 
British; Elizabeth Emerson, their daughter, who married 
George Steely, lieutenant in the War of 1812; George 
Steely, their son, who married Hannah Hiser, and who 
were the parents of Harlin Melville Steely. 

Mr. Steely for years has been attorney for the Chicago 
and Eastern Illinois Railway Company, the Lake Erie and 
Western Railroad Company, the Toledo, Saint Louis and 
Western Railroad Company, the street railway system of 
the City of Danville, and the Illinois Power and Light Cor- 
poration, and a great number of coal and other business 
corporations, and is still active in the practice. 



Oliver Morton Jones, an attorney with offices in the 
Daniel Building, at Danville, has practiced law in this city 
for over thirty-eight years and ranks among the most 
prominent lawyers of Vermilion County. He was born at 
Rob Roy, Fountain County, Indiana, January 18, 1867, the 
son of Henry B. and Joanna Dudley (Meeker) Jones. 

Henry B. Jones was born at Rob Roy, Indiana. He 
was a farmer during his life and lived on the same farm, 
where he was born, until seven months prior to his death 
in 1904. He is buried in Fountain County, Indiana. Mr. 
Jones took an active part in the public affairs of his com- 
munity, holding public office, such as trustee of schools a 
number of times. He was an active Republican from the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 621 

organization of that party until his death. His widow 
lives at 821 Franklin Street, Danville. She is a native of 
Fountain County, Indiana. Two sons were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Jones: Oliver Morton, the subject of this sketch; 
and L. E., lives at 821 Franklin Street, Danville. 

Oliver Morton Jones spent his boyhood on a farm near 
Rob Roy, Indiana, and attended the country schools near 
his home. He attended high school at Attica, Indiana, and 
was graduated from Purdue University with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in June, 1889. He was graduated 
from the Law Department of the University of Michigan 
in June, 1891, and was licensed to practice law by the 
Supreme Court of Michigan on the 29th day of May, 1891, 
by the Supreme Court of Indiana, June 26, 1891, and by 
the Supreme Court of Illinois on January 19, 1892. Mr. 
Jones came to Danville to begin the practice of law on 
November 9, 1891, and has practiced here continuously 
since that date. 

October 7, 1891, Mr. Jones married Miss Emma Fouts, 
a native of Deer Creek, Indiana, the daughter of Solomon 
and Margaret (Bridge) Fouts, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. He died April 1, 
1907, and his wife died November 1, 1911. Three children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Jones: 1. Josephine, was a 
teacher of music and voice culture at the University of 
Wisconsin prior to her marriage to Professor L. L. litis, 
who is also connected with the Department of Music at 
the University of Wisconsin. She is a graduate of North- 
western University. Mr. and Mrs. litis live at 2306 Van 
Hise Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin. 2. Joanna, the wife 
of Louis G. Bishop, of Danville. She is a teacher of elocu- 
tion. She is a graduate of Hamilton College, Lexington, 
Kentucky, and of the Leland Powers School of the Spoken 
Word, Boston, Massachusetts. 3. Paul F., resides at 208 
East Roselawn Avenue, Danville. He was born Novem- 
ber 6, 1898. He is a graduate of Danville High School, 



622 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

1917, and attended Northwestern University. He was 
second lieutenant of Infantry, United States Army, dur- 
ing the World War. He was graduated from the Law 
Department of the University of Michigan in 1922 and 
was admitted to practice by Supreme Court of Illinois in 
that year. He is now a member of the firm of Jones, 
Mclntire & Jones, attorneys, Danville. He is a member of 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. Mr. 
Jones was city attorney for Danville in 1925. He was 
commander of American Legion Post No. 210, in 1927. 
Politically, he is a Republican. He married Edith L. Fair- 
child in 1924. 

Mr. Jones has always been a Republican. He was a 
member of the Vermilion County Board of Supervisors 
for twelve years, chairman of the Road Committee for 
eight years during the time the county hard road system 
was constructed. Acting with Arthur R. Hall, he prepared 
and introduced all resolutions and other legal work for the 
county hard road system. He was a member and presi- 
dent of the Board of Education for about twelve years, 
and was corporation counsel for the city of Danville for 
six years. Mr. Jones holds membership in St. James 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Danville, and is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of 
Pythias. 

Hiram Jones, paternal grandfather of Oliver Morton 
Jones, was born in North Carolina in 1796. When a child 
of eight he moved to Tennessee and from there to Ken- 
tucky, where he was married to Sally Taylor in 1818. They 
moved to Fountain County, Indiana, in 1828. Sally Taylor 
was born in Kentucky. Both paternal grandparents died 
in Fountain County, Indiana, in 1878. 

Usual H. Meeker, maternal grandfather of Oliver Mor- 
ton Jones, was born in New York State in 1811. His wife, 
Sarah Dudley, was born in Maine in 1809. Both of them, 
during childhood, moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, where 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 623 

they were married. They moved to Fountain County, 
Indiana, in 1833. Both died and are buried in Fountain 
County, Indiana. 

The ancestry of Oliver Morton Jones is an example of 
the mingling of the people of New England with the people 
of the southern states in the settlement of the states of 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin. A large 
percentage of the citizens of these states are descended 
from pioneers who came from both the northeastern and 
southeastern parts of the United States. The citizens of 
these states present a composite picture of the citizens of 
America during and shortly after the Revolutionary War. 



I. Ray Carter. — Perhaps one of the best known of the 
younger lawyers of Vermilion County is found in I. Ray 
Carter, of Danville. He is a native of Illinois, born at 
Thomasboro, Champaign County, September 22, 1891, the 
son of Isaac and Eliza Ann (Faulkner) Carter. 

Isaac Carter, who lives retired at Rossville, Illinois, has 
been a highly successful farmer of Champaign County. 
He was born at Bismarck, Illinois, and when a young man 
located at Thomasboro, where he remained until 1893. He 
then removed to Gifford, Illinois, and in 1902 settled at 
Henning. He has lived at Rossville since 1904. Eliza Ann 
(Faulkner) Carter was born at Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire, and died March 24, 1928. She is buried at Rossville. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Carter were born four children : I. Ray, 
the subject of this sketch; Clark C, Leslie, and Edna, all 
living at Rossville. 

I. Ray Carter grew up at Rossville, where he received 
his early education. Following his graduation from Ross- 
ville High School in 1910 he attended the University of 
Illinois, from which he received his Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree in 1914. Two years later he was graduated in law 



624 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

from the University of Chicago, and immediately engaged 
in practice as assistant state's attorney under John H. 
Lewman. In 1924 Mr. Carter left the state's attorney office 
and at that time formed a law partnership with John II. 
Lewman. 

On April 23, 1921, Mr. Carter was united in marriage 
with Miss Carrie Partlow, of Danville, the daughter of 
Hon. Augustus A. and Zora (Bookwalter) Partlow, of Illi- 
nois. Mr. Partlow was circuit judge for two terms and 
at present is Commissioner of Supreme Court of Illinois. 
His wife is deceased. Two children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Carter, Robert Partlow and Anne Carolyn. 

Mr. Carter is a member of the Methodist Church, 
Masonic Lodge, thirty-second degree; Elks Club, Knights 
of Pythias and American Legion. He is a Republican in 
politics. 

During the World War, Mr. Carter enlisted in the 
Ordnance Department, April 11, 1918, and was discharged 
from the service, December 29, 1918. 



George Steely, M. D. — One of the foremost physicians 
and surgeons of Vermilion County is Doctor Steely, who 
has successfully engaged in the practice of his profession 
at Danville for almost twenty-five years. He was born at 
Hoopeston, September 30, 1879, the son of Harlin M. and 
Miriam M. (Marquess) Steely. 

A sketch of Harlin M. Steely appears elsewhere in this 
history. 

George Steely was educated in the public schools of 
Hoopeston and Danville. He attended the University of 
Illinois and the University of Chicago, graduating from 
the latter in 1902 with the degree of bachelor of science. 
He took a course at Rush Medical College, Chicago, and 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Boston, being 




GEORGE M. STEELY, M. D. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 625 

graduated from the latter in 1905 with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine. He began the practice of his profession at 
Danville in 1905 and continued in general practice until he 
entered the service of his country in the World War. He 
enlisted September 30, 1918, and was commissioned cap- 
tain in the Medical Corps, U. S. A., October 24, 1918. He 
was stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Georgia, from Novem- 
ber 8 to December 24th; then ordered to Hoboken, New 
Jersey; and then stationed at General Hospital, No. 1, 
from December 31, 1918, to August 23, 1919, with the ex- 
ception of two weeks in March, when he was ordered to 
Rockefeller Institute for special training in the treatment 
of infected wounds under Doctor Alexis Carrel and staff, 
and one week under Doctor Shutro at Polyclinic Institute, 
New York. On August 23, 1919, he was honorably dis- 
charged and returned to Danville where he resumed his 
practice, which has been limited entirely to general 
surgery. 

Doctor Steely is staff surgeon at St. Elizabeth and Lake 
View Hospitals, Danville: lecturer on orthopedic surgery 
in the Training School for nurses at both of these hospitals ; 
and local surgeon of the New York Central Railroad, Chi- 
cago, Cincinnati, Cleveland and St. Louis Railroad, Illinois 
Power and Light Corporation, Danville Street Railway 
and Light Company, and numerous industrial and casualty 
companies. He is a member of the Vermilion County Med- 
ical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, Aesculapian 
Society of the Wabash Valley, Tri State Medical Society, 
Association of New York Central Railway Surgeons, 
American Association of Railway Surgeons, American 
Medical Association, and became a Fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons at New York City October 24, 1924. 

On January 17, 1906, Doctor Steely married Miss 
Edythe H. Nims, of Hinsdale, New Hampshire, the daugh- 
ter of Ruel P. and Mary (Mann) Nims. Mr. Nims died 
in 1916 and his wife died in 1892. Doctor and Mrs. Steely 

6— Vol. 2 



626 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

have no children. She is the registrar of Governor Brad- 
ford Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, 
Danville. 

Doctor Steely is a Knight Templar, a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, a Shriner, and belongs to the Elks Club. He 
is also a member of Delta Tau Delta college fraternity and 
Phi Rho Sigma (medical) fraternity, and the Kiwanis, 
Country, and Yacht Clubs of Danville. He is also a life 
member of the Sons of American Revolution. Politically 
he is a Republican. 



Milton John Wolford, deceased, often referred to as 
"the first citizen of Danville," was widely known through- 
out Vermilion County as a banker, philanthropist, and dis- 
tinguished citizen. He was born near Coultersville, now 
West Sunbury, Butler County, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1844, 
and died in Danville, May 28, 1928. He is buried at 
Danville. 

Mr. Wolford received his education in the public schools 
of Butler County, Pennsylvania, and attended Westminster 
College. He gave up his university work in his junior year 
and was later graduated from the Iron City Commercial 
College, Pittsburgh. On August 4, 1862, he enlisted in 
Capt. Winfield H. Clarke's Company F, One Hundred and 
Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving 
nine months, and was honorably discharged on May 26, 
1863, at Camp Custin, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. In 1864 
he re-enlisted as first sergeant in Company A, Capt. W. 
R. Hutchinson's company, Sixth Regiment of Pennsylvania 
Heavy Artillery, or the Two Hundred Twelfth Regiment 
of Pennsylvania Volunteers. Later, he was promoted to 
the rank of second lieutenant and as a member of Battery 
A, Sixth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, participated in the 
campaign through Maryland to Antietam, arriving there 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 627 

the last day of the battle. He was wounded at the battle 
of Fredericksburg. He saw service in nearly all the im- 
portant engagements in the Civil War, and was honorably 
discharged at Fort Ethan Allen, Virginia, June 13, 1865, 
as a second lieutenant. 

In 1866 Mr. Wolford came to Illinois, first locating in 
Areola, Douglas County, where he taught school for two 
terms. He then accepted a position as cashier of the Can- 
non & Wyeth Bank, remaining there until the firm moved 
to Danville. He then went with his brother-in-law, J. C. 
Justice, in the banking business. In October, 1875, he re- 
moved to Danville and went with the Vermilion County 
Bank. Later he went with the L. T. & C. J. Palmer Broth- 
ers in their loan office. In 1880 he was elected secretary 
of the Danville Benefit & Building Association, and also 
carried on an insurance business. On May 2, 1892, he with 
Messrs. Palmer, organized the Palmer National Bank, and 
Mr. Wolford was the first cashier and served in that 
capacity until 1902, when he was elected president and held 
that position until his death. He also served as secretary 
of the old Danville Opera House Company and director of 
the Vermilion County Abstract Company. For years he 
was on the board of directors and president of the Lake- 
view Hospital, and was a prominent figure in promoting 
and building the new addition to the hospital. He was 
also largely instrumental in making the Young Women's 
Christian Association Building a realization, and he was 
an important figure in the building of the Salvation Army 
Citadel, Old Ladies Home, and Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

The Hotel Wolford was named in honor of Mr. Wolford 
and it is situated on the old Wolford homestead in Danville. 

In 1873 Mr. Wolford married Miss Maude S. Blackwell, 
of Areola, Illinois, born January 21, 1848, at New Bern, 
North Carolina. She lives at Danville. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Wolford were born the following children: Ann Selby, 



628 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

born November 17, 1873, the widow of Orndorf Long 
Ridgely; Frances McCann, born February 19, 1875, died 
October 28, 1884; Maude Blackwell, born October 8, 1876, 
married Charles Frederick Shane, Danville, Illinois, and 
they have two children, Wolford Milton, born September 
22, 1907, and John W., born February 11, 1916; Sarah 
Wicks, born June 26, 1882, married Roscoe Simpson Fair- 
child, Danville, Illinois, and they have two children, Roscoe 
W., born June 18, 1917, and Harold B., born March 27, 1921; 
Albert Milton, born March 22, 1889, died October 22, 1899; 
and Harold Earnest, born July 23, 1891, died March 9, 
1924. He married, October 3, 1913, Margaret Herbst. She 
resides in Danville. Two children were born to this union, 
Mary Jane, born July 8, 1914, and Milton John, born Jan- 
uary 19, 1916. 

Mr. Wolford was affiliated with the Elks Club, Grand 
Army of the Republic, Sons of the Revolution, and Young 
Men's Christian Association. 

The European ancestors of Mr. Wolford were French 
Huguenots. In other words, they were French Protestant 
refugees, who were stoned out of France during the relig- 
ious wars of the sixteenth century. They took refuge in 
the mountains of Switzerland, from whence they came 
directly to America in the early part of the eighteenth 
century. The progenitor of this line in America, Johannes 
Wolfort, landed at the port of Philadelphia in 1739. His 
son, George Wolfort, served in the War of the American 
Revolution as a private in Capt. Joseph Gear's Company, 
Ninth Battalion, for Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and 
under Col. J. Huber for 1778. 

Milton John Wolford was the son of Jacob and Lavina 
(Adams) Wolford. He was born in Slippery Rock Town- 
ship, Butler County, Pennsylvania, April 22, 1817, and died 
August 21, 1897. His wife was born August 9, 1817, and 
died in September, 1902. They were married July 4, 1839, 
and spent their entire lives in Butler County. Their chil- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 629 

dren were: Perry, born June 25, 1840, died in 1905; Eme- 
line, born April 13, 1842, deceased ; Milton John, the subject 
of this sketch; Lewis I., born January 27, 1846, died in 
1913; Charlotte, born February 18, 1848, died October 20, 
1864; Sarah Margaret, born October 25, 1854, deceased; 
John R., born March 31, 1857, died May 21, 1872; and Ange- 
line, born August 8, 1859. 

Jacob Wolford was the son of Henry and Mary (Frick) 
Wolford. He was born in Westmoreland County, Penn- 
sylvania, and died in 1856. She was born there and died in 
June, 1868. They came to Blacktown, Mercer County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1807, and later removed to Slippery Rock 
Township, Butler County, Pennsylvania. Finally, they 
located in Cherry Township, Butler County. The first 
school house in Butler County was erected on the Wolford 
clearing near Centreville. 



John F. Twomey. — Prominent among the young attor- 
neys of Danville may be mentioned John F. Twomey, who 
is engaged in practice with Hugh E. Bouton, with offices 
in the Adams Building. Mr. Twomey was born at Kanka- 
kee, Illinois, November 26, 1900, the son of Daniel E. and 
Martha (Creighen) Twomey. 

Daniel E. Twomey was born in Bedford, Indiana, in 
1863. His wife was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1865, 
and came to this country with her parents in 1877. Mr. 
Twomey entered the employ of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road in 1881, at the age of nineteen years, and retired 
from the company's employ in November, 1927, as a pas- 
senger conductor. He is a member of Holy Trinity Catho- 
lic Church, Knights of Columbus, Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians, and Holy Name Society. Mr. and Mrs. Twomey 
reside at Bloomington, Illinois. They are the parents of 
the following children: Marie, married Raymond Brady, 



630 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

lives at Cheyenne, Wyoming; Florence, married A. J. 
Zehnedner, lives at Huntington, Indiana; Edward, lives 
at Bloomington, Illinois, is a World War veteran, having 
served in France with the Three Hundred and Fifth Motor 
Transport Corps; Mildred, school teacher, Chicago, Illi- 
nois; and John F., the subject of this sketch. 

John F. Twomey received his education in the parochial 
schools of Bloomington, Illinois, and in 1918 was gradu- 
ated from St. Mary's High School. He received his degree 
from the Law School of Illinois Wesleyan University in 
1924, and was admitted to the bar of Illinois on October 
16, 1924. Mr. Twomey came to Danville at that date and 
established offices in the First National Bank Building. 
He has been associated in practice with Mr. Bouton since 
July 1, 1928. On July 1, 1929, Circuit Judge S. Murray 
Clark appointed Mr. Twomey Adult Probation Officer of 
Vermilion County. 

Mr. Twomey is a Republican and a member of the 
board of supervisors of Vermilion County. He was sena- 
torial committeeman of this district in 1928. He holds 
membership in St. Patrick's Catholic Church, Knights of 
Columbus, and Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Twomey is not married. 



John H. Lewman. — As a practicing attorney, the career 
of John H. Lewman has been identified with the city of 
Danville for almost thirty-five years. Mr. Lewman was 
born at Danville, December 28, 1866, the son of Hugh and 
Mary (Liggett) Lewman. 

The paternal grandfather of John H. Lewman, James 
Lewman, was a native of Kentucky. He was among the 
earliest settlers of Vermilion County and became a suc- 
cessful farmer. He sold his land in 1875 and removed to 
Kansas, where he died. Jesse Liggett, maternal grand- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 631 

father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Virginia 
in 1805 and was only a year old when his parents brought 
him to Ohio, where he lived until 1835. He then came to 
Vermilion County and entered a tract of land in Pilot 
Township, where he lived until his death in 1898. 

Hugh Lewman was interested in agriculture through- 
out his life and owned a well improved farm in Vermilion 
County. He died in 1869. His wife is also deceased. Their 
sons were: W. C, postmaster of Danville; and John H., 
the subject of this sketch. 

John H. Lewman spent his boyhood on a farm and was 
educated in the country schools of Vermilion County. Fol- 
lowing his graduation from Danville High School in 1888 
he taught school at Danville for a short time. He then 
spent two years at Cornell University and in 1894 was 
graduated from the Law School of the University of 
Michigan. During that year he was admitted to the bar 
of Vermilion County. Mr. Lewman has taken an active 
part in public affairs. In 1899 he was elected city attorney 
of the city of Danville and was re-elected twice, serving in 
that office for six years. He was elected mayor of Dan- 
ville in 1905 and re-elected in 1907. In 1908 he was elected 
State's Attorney. 

In 1898 John H. Lewman enlisted in Battery A, First 
Illinois Volunteers, for service in the Spanish-American 
War and served in Porto Rico. He was honorably dis- 
charged in the fall of 1898 as sergeant and became an 
officer in the Illinois National Guard in 1899. He was pro- 
moted to captain in 1904 and resigned from the service in 
1909. In 1918, with Oscar P. Yeager, he organized the 
Tenth Regiment, Illinois National Guard, and became Lieu- 
tenant Colonel of this regiment. He served until 1921 
when he resigned. 

John H. Lewman is identified with the Vermilion 
County Bar Association, and the Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation. He is a member of Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient 



632 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Free and Accepted Masons, No. 38; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple; Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, No. 332; and Veterans of Foreign 
Wars. He is also a member of United Spanish-American 
War Veterans Camp Egbert No. 1, Past Commander. 



Asa M. Bushnell. — The years that cover the active busi- 
ness career of Asa M. Bushnell, who is president of the 
American Bank & Trust Company, Danville, have chron- 
icled his success as the result of determined and persistent 
purpose and close application. He is well known as a 
financier, but has also identified himself with various other 
enterprises which have materially advanced the interests 
of the city and county. Throughout his entire career he 
has retained the high regard of a large circle of friends — 
a fact indicative that his pronounced traits of character 
are those which everywhere command confidence and trust. 

A native of Illinois, Mr. Bushnell was born in Cook 
County, December 8, 1849, his parents being Henry and 
Lavina (Dayton) Bushnell, who were natives of Ohio and 
New Jersey, respectively. Before his marriage the father 
came west becoming one of the early settlers of Cook 
County, Illinois, and he purchased a farm in Blue Island, 
which he operated for a number of years. In 1854, how- 
ever, he removed to Vermilion County, taking up his resi- 
dence about ten miles east of Danville, where he continued 
in agricultural pursuits for a few years. At the end of 
that time, however, he returned to Cook County, where he 
made his home during the Civil War. He was the first 
man drafted from that county but his services were re- 
fused and the company he organized there was given to 
another. After the close of the war he again came to Ver- 
milion County but in 1874 removed to California and spent 
the remainder of his life in Monterey County, his time and 




&J#M^s&^&L 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 633 

attention being devoted to farming. His death occurred 
there March 19, 1901. 

In the acquirement of an education, Asa M. Bushnell 
attended the grade schools of Cook County, Illinois, Marion 
Academy in Indiana, and the Bryant & Stratton Business 
College of Chicago. Upon the home farm he spent his boy- 
hood days, remaining under the paternal roof until twen- 
ty-two years of age. He engaged in clerking for the firm 
of Gundy Brothers at Myersville, Vermilion County, for 
one year and in 1873 opened a store of his own at Bis- 
marck, Vermilion County, which he conducted for twenty 
years. While engaged in business there he also served as 
postmaster for eighteen years, one term of this time being 
under the administration of President Cleveland, although 
he is a strong Republican. While residing at Bismarck he 
also served as school director for several years. It was in 
1894 that Mr. Bushnell removed to Danville, where he was 
first engaged in the music business, purchasing his stock 
from the firm of Lyon & Healy, of Chicago, but a few 
months later he sold out and bought an interest in the im- 
plement and hardware business with J. B. Chambers, with 
whom he was connected for seven years. On disposal of 
his interests in that enterprise he organized the Danville 
Wholesale Grocery Company, but sold out at the end of 
a year and in 1907 organized the American Bank & Trust 
Company, of which he has since been its president. The 
bank has steadily prospered and is regarded as one of the 
safest and most conservative financial institutions of east- 
ern Illinois. The building it occupies and the one ad- 
joining it are owned by Mr. Bushnell, who still owns a fine 
farm near Bismarck. 

Mr. Bushnell carried into the banking business the 
friendly courtesy for his customers, learned in his many 
years as a merchant, and the patrons of the American 
Bank & Trust Company are welcomed as they pass the 
president's desk with a cheery "Hello, George," and 



634 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

"Howdy, Charlie," which has done much to increase the 
business of the institution. 

On October 15, 1873, Mr. Bushnell married Miss Willa 
M. Shockley, a native of Ohio. Their family numbers three 
sons and a daughter, as follows: Clyde H., farmer, lives 
in Vermilion County; Frank, broker, lives at Wichita, 
Kansas; Mabel, married 0. H. Fairchilds, of Chicago and 
they have two children; and Asa Barton, merchant, lives 
at Danville. 

Fraternally, Mr. Bushnell is affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and Modern Woodmen of America. He at- 
tends the Methodist Church. 

A man of good business and executive ability, Mr. 
Bushnell has met with excellent success in his undertak- 
ings, and is today numbered among the men of affluence 
in Danville. He has known the pleasure of success, not 
simply in the pecuniary reward that has come to him, but 
also in that enjoyment which comes in the accomplishment 
of what one undertakes. He has ever persevered in the 
pursuit of a persistent purpose and is now numbered 
among those who are the factors in Vermilion County's 
material upbuilding. He is a splendid type of the Ameri- 
can business man, alert, energetic, and determined, carry- 
ing forward to successful completion whatever he under- 
takes. 



James A. Foster, well known in Danville as the efficient 
cashier of the American Bank & Trust Company, was born 
at Newark, West Virginia, May 4, 1873, the son of Thomas 
and Mary (Hustead) Foster. 

The Foster family is of English descent. Thomas Fos- 
ter was born in Wirt County, West Virginia, and through- 
out his life engaged in the mercantile and lumber business. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 635 

He served as sheriff and treasurer of Wirt County, West 
Virginia. He died in 1917 and his wife died in 1920. 
Both are buried at Newark, West Virginia. Mary (Hu- 
stead) Foster was born in the Ohio Valley, her ancestors 
being of French extraction. There were three children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Foster: Lena, died at the age of eigh- 
teen years; Frances, married William Bailey, lives at Oil- 
ton, Oklahoma; and James A., the subject of this sketch. 

James A. Foster was educated in the grade and high 
schools of Elizabeth, West Virginia. Shortly after com- 
pleting his schooling he came to Illinois, locating at Ridge- 
farm, in Vermilion County, where he secured a clerkship 
in the Farmers State Bank, in which institution he rose to 
the position of cashier. Subsequently, he assumed the du- 
ties of assistant cashier in the State Bank of Danville, after 
reorganized as the Danville National Bank, and he was so 
serving when in May, 1907, in association with Asa M. 
Bushnell and Alonzo L. Lyons, he established the American 
Bank & Trust Company, of Danville. Mr. Foster was 
elected cashier of the newly organized institution, with 
which he has thus been officially identified during the en- 
tire period of its existence, and to the continued success of 
which he has contributed in material measure. He belongs 
to various banking associations and formerly served as 
chairman of the Vermilion County Federation. 

In 1901 Mr. Foster married Mary E. Bines, the daugh- 
ter of William M. Bines, of Ridgefarm, Illinois. Mr. Bines 
was a prominent Democrat who represented his district 
in the State Legislature, and also served the people of his 
community in various other offices of public trust and re- 
sponsibility. 

Mr. and Mrs. Foster are the parents of a daughter, 
Mary, who attends the Western College for Women, Ox- 
ford, Ohio. 



636 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mr. Foster is a stanch Republican and is affiliated with 
the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Anchor Lodge; 
and Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree. He also 
belongs to the Chamber of Commerce. His wife holds mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian Church. 



The American Bank & Trust Company, of Danville, was 
established in May, 1907, by A. M. Bushnell, Alonzo L. 
Lyons, W. M. Acton, and J. A. Foster. Its first officers 
were as follows: A. M. Bushnell, president; A. L. Lyons, 
vice president; and J. A. Foster, cashier. 

The capital stock was fixed at $100,000.00. It has 
been augmented since by a surplus of $75,000.00, undi- 
vided profits, capital and surplus of over $300,000.00, 
which places the American Bank & Trust Company on the 
honor roll of Illinois financial institutions. 

The present officers and directors of the American 
Bank & Trust Company are, as follows: A. M. Bushnell, 
president; W. M. Acton, vice president; J. A. Foster, 
cashier; L. O. Froman and E. H. Bleveans, assistant 
cashiers : and J. H. Willett, trust officer. Directors : W. M. 
Acton, W. F. Banta, N. J. Basch, H. F. Brown, A. M. 
Bushnell, H. C. Darnall, August Faulstick, J. A. Foster, 
and C. W. Johns. 

A. M. Bushnell and J. A. Foster, to whom largely be- 
longs the credit for the growth of the institution, have 
been squarely backed by the board of directors, which is 
composed of some of Danville's outstanding citizens. The 
quarters of the American Bank & Trust Company, which 
have been maintained in the same building from the be- 
ginning, were modernized for banking purposes and are 
modern in every detail. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 637 

Robert W. Johnson. — One of the most prominent of the 
younger attorneys of Danville may be found in Robert 
W. Johnson, who has offices in the Daniel Building. He is 
a native of this city, born October 13, 1903, the son of 
Archibald G. and Julia (Young) Johnson. 

Archibald G. Johnson is a native of Danville, the son 
of Richard H. and Susan (Goodloe) Johnson. Both were 
born near Richmond, Kentucky. Richard H. Johnson came 
to Danville early in life and was prominent in newspaper 
circles, being editor of the Danville News for many years. 
He was also correspondent for several western news- 
papers. Both he and his wife are buried in Spring Hill 
Cemetery, Danville. Their son, Archibald G. Johnson, 
obtained a good education in the schools of Vermilion 
County. Early in life he was interested in the grocery 
business and later became associated with C. M. Young 
in the furniture business at Danville. After the latter's 
retirement Mr. Johnson continued the business until 1910, 
when he retired. He then became interested in the real 
estate business, with which he is now connected, ranking 
among the leading realtors of the city. Mr. Johnson is 
a Republican and has served as alderman of the Seventh 
Ward. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
Julia (Young) Johnson, who died March 30, 1928, was a 
native of Crawfordsville, Indiana, and the daughter of 
Cornelius M. and Alice (Welsheimer) Young, natives of 
Indiana, both now deceased. Mr. Young became a suc- 
cessful furniture dealer of Danville and it was he who 
was associated in business for many years with Archibald 
G. Johnson. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson: Robert W., the subject of this sketch; and Archi- 
bald, Jr., who attends the University of Illinois. 

Robert W. Johnson was educated in the public schools 
of Danville and following his graduation from Danville 
High School in 1921 he attended Wabash College for two 



638 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

years. He then entered the Law School of the University 
of Illinois, from which he was graduated in 1926. He was 
admitted to practice before the Illinois Bar in December of 
that year and then became associated in practice with the 
firm of Lewman & Carter, attorneys, Danville. Mr. John- 
son was subsequently admitted to practice before the 
Federal Courts. 

Politically, Mr. Johnson is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, Kappi Phi, Alpha Delta 
Phi, and Phi Delta Phi fraternities, and Young Men's 
Christian Association. He is past secretary and treasurer 
of the Vermilion County Bar Association and is a member 
of the American Business Club. 



Woods Hibbard Martin. — Recognized as one of the 
most influential citizens of Danville, where he is identified 
with the Second National Bank as executive vice presi- 
dent, is Woods Hibbard Martin. He was born at Shelby- 
ville, Illinois, June 25, 1882, the son of Elgin Homer and 
Mary (Sylvester) Martin. 

Both Elgin Homer Martin and his wife are natives of 
Illinois. Throughout his active career he engaged in the 
printing business. He now lives retired at Wilmer, Ala- 
bama. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Martin: 
Carlie E. Johnson, lives at Wilmer, Alabama; Bartlett 
F., lives at San Francisco, California; George M., lives at 
Danville; Ward E., lives at Wilmer, Alabama; Harry W., 
lives at Mobile, Alabama; and Woods Hibbard, the subject 
of this sketch. 

Woods Hibbard Martin began life as a newsboy. He 
later learned the printer's trade and in February, 1906, 
entered the services of the Second National Bank of Dan- 
ville as a messenger. He became collection clerk, general 
bookkeeper, and subsequently teller, being elected assis- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 639 

tant cashier on May 19, 1909. He became cashier of the 
institution August 10, 1925, and vice president and cashier 
on January 12, 1926. Mr. Martin has served in his present 
capacity as executive vice president since January 8, 1929. 

On December 3, 1912, Mr. Martin married Miss Mildred 
L. Erickson, of Danville, the daughter of L. M. and Nettie 
(Tyler) Erickson, of Iowa and Indiana, respectively. At 
present Mr. and Mrs. Erickson are residents of Danville. 
There are three children in the Martin family: Robert 
Woods, Jeanne Louise, and Barbara Ann, all students. 

Politically, Mr. Martin is identified with the Republican 
party; a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, No. 332, Past Exalted Ruler; and president of 
Piankeshaw Council, Boy Scouts of America. He served 
four years as a member of Company H, Fourth Illinois 
Infantry. 



Eldon LeRoy McLaughlin, who is successfully engaged 
in the practice of law at Danville, with offices in the Daniel 
Building, is among the leading young lawyers of Vermilion 
County. He was born at Elkhart, Indiana, January 14, 
1903, the son of Abraham Weldy and Dora Salome (Stal- 
ter) McLaughlin. 

Abraham Weldy McLaughlin was born in Fairfield 
County, Ohio. He spent his boyhood on a farm and became 
well known as a teacher of music. Later, he became a 
carpenter. He died October 15, 1911, and is buried at Elk- 
hart, Indiana. Mr. McLaughlin was a Democrat and a 
member of the Mennonite Church. His wife was born in 
Allen County, Ohio. The following children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin: Grover Cleveland, lives at 
Elkhart, Indiana; Lloyd, deceased; Harry, deceased; 
Nellie, deceased; Frederick Luther, lives at Elkhart, In- 
diana, is a World War veteran, having served with the 
rank of second lieutenant; Eldon LeRoy, the subject of 



640 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

this sketch; John Willard, lives at Elkhart, Indiana; and 
Joy Lucille, lives at home. 

Eldon LeRoy McLaughlin attended the public schools 
of Elkhart, and in 1927 was graduated from the Law 
School of the University of Illinois. He was admitted to 
the bar on October 15, 1927, and came to Danville in Feb- 
ruary, 1928. He was later admitted to practice in the 
Federal Court. 

Mr. McLaughlin is a Republican. He holds member- 
ship in St. James Methodist Episcopal Church, being a 
member of the choir. He belongs to Delta Theta Phi and 
Phi Eta Sigma fraternities, and Young Men's Christian 
Association. While a student at the University of Illinois, 
Mr. McLaughlin took an active part in athletics, being a 
member of the freshman varsity track teams. He also 
made freshman honors at the University. 



Ralph L. McCalman, who is president of R. McCalman, 
Inc., Danville, ranks among the city's most influential busi- 
ness men. He was born at Wilson, Wisconsin, October 20, 
1871, the son of John and Lucy (Lynde) McCalman. 

John McCalman was born at Glasgow, Scotland. He 
was graduated from Glasgow University when 21 years of 
age and soon after came to the United States, where he 
followed his profession as construction engineer. He en- 
gaged in railroad construction work in Michigan, and was 
identified with the building of the Wisconsin Central Rail- 
road, Chicago & Grand Trunk Railroad, and London, Hu- 
ron & Bruce Railroad. His activities took him through the 
United States, Canada, and Mexico. He retired in 1912 
and lived at Traverse City, Mich., until his death in 1914. 
His wife, born at Rock Island, Illinois, died in 1928. Both 
are buried at Traverse City, Michigan. Mr. McCalman 




RALPH L. McCALMAN 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 641 

was a Republican and a member of the Episcopal Church. 
To Mr. and Mrs. McCalman were born five children: 
John L., born in 1868, died in 1914, was widely known 
throughout Michigan as a consulting engineer; George, 
born in 1874, died in 1895; Ralph L., the subject of this 
sketch; Donald, born in 1877, consulting engineer, lives at 
St. Louis, Mo.; and Malcolm, construction engineer, lives 
in Michigan. 

Following his schooling at Racine, Wis., where he com- 
pleted a college course at Racine College, Ralph L. McCal- 
man went with the civil engineering department of the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. He was later asso- 
ciated with the Chicago & West Michigan Railroad and the 
Sandusky & Columbus Short Line Railroad. In 1893 he 
went with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad at Dan- 
ville, where he was identified with the engineering depart- 
ment, later becoming assistant engineer. He subsequently 
served as locating engineer and resigned from the com- 
pany's employ in 1906 as division engineer and went with 
the Illinois Traction System at Decatur, Illinois, as main- 
tenance engineer. In 1910 he established an engineering 
contracting business at Decatur and six years later re- 
moved to Danville, where he established the R. McCalman 
Construction Company, which was later incorporated as 
R. McCalman, Inc. The company specializes in heavy con- 
crete work, including road and bridge building. Mr. Mc- 
Calman was also one of the incorporators of the Material 
& Fuel Company, Inc., being president and treasurer of 
both companies. 

March 3, 1901, Mr. McCalman married Miss Myrtle 
Hopple, daughter of Jerry and Mattie (Schieber) Hopple, 
natives of Crawford County, Ohio. He lives at Bucyrus, 
Ohio. His wife died in 1928. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. McCalman are: Helen, married John Funk, lives at 
Danville, and they have one daughter, Marj; and Myra, 

7— Vol. 2 



642 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

married M. Rovelstadt, lives at Urbana, 111., and they have 
a daughter, Sue. 

Politically, Mr. McCalman is a Republican. He is af- 
filiated with Furtherlight Lodge, No. 1130, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons; Macon Chapter, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons, No. 21; Springfield Consistory, thirty-second degree; 
Ansar Temple; Gao Grotto; Danville Yacht Club; and 
Roselawn Golf Club. 



Clarence F. Carter. — Numbered among the enterpris- 
ing and successful young business men of Danville is 
Clarence F. Carter, who is vice president and general man- 
ager of The Modern Machine Shop, Inc., 123-125 North 
Hazel Street. He was born at Sidell, Illinois, March 12, 
1895, the son of Charles E. and Birdie (Mitchell) Carter. 

A complete sketch of Charles E. Carter appears else- 
where in this history. 

Clarence F. Carter was educated in the public schools 
of Wichita Falls, Texas, and Canton, Mississippi. After 
leaving school he learned the machinist's trade while in 
the employ of Robert Holmes & Brothers. He completed 
his apprenticeship in March, 1915, and two years later 
went to San Francisco, California, where he was engaged 
in marine work for the Union Iron Works. Mr. Carter 
returned to Illinois in 1921 and located with the Chicago 
& Eastern Illinois Railroad, Danville, as a machinist. In 
January, 1922, he established a machine shop at the rear 
of 516 West Harrison, Street, called The Modern Machine 
Shop. The business was moved to 22 East Harrison Street 
in 1922, and in July, 1925, a modern plant was erected at 
the present location. The company was incorporated in 
June, 1924, at which time Mr. Carter became vice presi- 
dent and general manager. He is the builder of the engine 
of the boat, "Miss Danville II," a one hundred fifty-one 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 643 

inch hydroplane type speedboat, which won the Missis- 
sippi Valley Power Boat Association championship in 1927. 
Mr. Carter was associated in this work with James Barton. 

October 12, 1914, Mr. Carter married Miss Emily M. 
Robinson, the daughter of George and Leota (Atherton) 
Robinson, natives of Pennsylvania and residents of Dan- 
ville. They have two children: Robert Eugene, born 
November 12, 1915; and Mildred, born June 12, 1917. 

Mr. Carter is a member of the Third Church of Christ, 
and is affiliated with the Masonic lodge, thirty-second 
degree, Elks Club, Rotary Club, Danville Country Club, 
Walnut Hill Boat Club, National Speed Boat Club of New 
York, and Chamber of Commerce. Politically, he is a 
Republican. 



Charles E. Carter, who is president of The Modern 
Machine Shop, Inc., Danville, is widely and favorably 
known among the dependable business men of Vermilion 
County. He is a native of this county, born December 30, 
1871, the son of Ezekiel and Cecelia (Hunt) Carter. 

Ezekiel Carter was a native of Pennsylvania and his 
wife was born in Ohio. He came to Vermilion County 
when a young man and on several occasions drove cattle 
from Danville to Buffalo, New York, during the early days 
and drove hogs to Chicago, Illinois. He became a success- 
ful farmer of Vermilion County. He and his wife are 
deceased and are buried in Fairmount Cemetery, Fair- 
mount, Illinois. He was a Republican and a member of 
the Presbyterian Church. To Mr. and Mrs. Carter the 
following children were born: John, lives at Rochester, 
Indiana; Alexander and George, both deceased; Will, lives 
at Armstrong, Illinois; Charles E., the subject of this 
sketch; Lottie, deceased, was the wife of James McAllister; 
Alice, the widow of George Bird, lives at Danville; and 
Belle, married J. A. Boyd, lives at Wellington, Texas. 



644 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Charles E. Carter spent his boyhood in Vermilion 
County and was educated in the district schools. He went 
to Ludlow, Illinois, in 1892, where he spent two years as 
a meat dealer. He then went to Canton, Mississippi, where 
he purchased a large plantation and sawmill, which he 
operated until 1903. The next five years were spent at 
Iowa Park, Texas, and in 1908 Mr. Carter returned to 
Danville, where he became associated with the Western 
Brick Company. In 1927 he became identified with the 
Modern Machine Shop, Inc., with which he has since been 
actively identified as president. 

In 1892 Mr. Carter married Miss Birdie H. Mitchell, 
daughter of Oscar Mitchell, a native of Indiana. He died 
in California. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Carter: Charles Harvey, lives at Danville, married Mary 
Hankins; Clarence F., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this history; and Birdie, married Earl Amos, lives at 
State Line, Illinois. 

Mr. Carter is a Republican, a member of the Baptist 
Church, and belongs to the Elks Club. 



Louis Clements. — One of the most influential figures in 
professional circles in Vermilion County, is Louis Clem- 
ents, who as a successful lawyer of Danville holds leading 
rank in his chosen field of advance. He is a native of Car- 
bondale, Illinois, born September 12, 1877, the son of Col. 
Isaac and Josephine (Nutt) Clements. 

Col. Isaac Clements was born at Brookville, Indiana, 
March 31, 1837. He taught school early in life in Indiana, 
and later entered Asbury University, now DePauw Uni- 
versity, at Greencastle, Indiana, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1859. He then removed to Jackson County, Illinois, 
where he taught school and studied law, being admitted 
to the Illinois bar in 1861. At the beginning of the Civil 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 645 

War he entered the service and became a second lieutenant 
in Company G, Ninth Illinois Regiment. He was promoted 
to provost marshal at Athens, Alabama, and served until 
1864, resigning to join his company which was marching 
on Atlanta. He was twice severely wounded at Shiloh 
and again at Corinth, and participated in many important 
battles. He was honorably discharged with the rank of 
captain. Upon his return to Carbondale, Illinois, he prac- 
ticed law and played a prominent part in public affairs, 
being elected to Congress from his district. In 1877 he 
was appointed penitentiary commissioner for southern 
prisons at Chester, serving eleven years. Later, he was 
United States pension agent at Chicago for three years. 
He spent one year as superintendent of the Soldiers Or- 
phans Home at Normal Illinois, and in December, 1898, 
was appointed governor of the National Soldiers Home 
at Danville, being the first to hold that position. He was 
an honorary member of the Masonic fraternity and a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Colonel 
Clements died May 31, 1909. His wife was the daughter 
of Cyrus Nutt, D. D., LL. D., of Bloomington, Indiana. He 
was a professor in Allegheny College, Meadville, Pennsyl- 
vania, at one time, and was the first president of Asbury 
University. Later, he served as professor at the Univer- 
sity of Bloomington, Indiana. Three sons were born to 
Col. Isaac and Josephine (Nutt) Clements, as follows: 
Frank, retired, lives at Carbondale, Illinois; Louis, the 
subject of this sketch; and Robert, physician, lives at 
Danville. 

Louis Clements grew up at Carbondale, Illinois, where 
he received his schooling. He was graduated from Illinois 
State Normal College in 1897 and from Northwestern Uni- 
versity with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1902. He 
studied law and was admitted to practice in 1904, at that 
time forming a partnership with H. M. Steely, of Dan- 
ville. This association continued until 1908, and since that 



646 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

date Mr. Clements has engaged in private practice. He 
has offices in the First National Bank Building. 

Mr. Clements was married June 29, 1910, to Miss 
Blanche Hogan, of Mound City, Illinois, the daughter of 
Major Daniel and Dora (Wallace) Hogan, the former, a 
native of Ireland and the latter of Kentucky. Mr. Hogan, 
deceased, was prominent in Illinois politics for many years 
and served with distinction in the Illinois State Senate. 
His widow lives at Los Angeles, California. Two children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Clements: Charlotte Carter, 
born July, 1914; and Louis, Jr., born August, 1917. 

Mr. Clements has always been a Republican. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Masonic 
Lodge, Elks, Danville Country Club, and Danville Yacht 
Club. He is president of the Big Bend Coal & Clay Com- 
pany and a director of the Eel River Coal Company, both 
of Indianapolis, Indiana. 



Herbert E. Cockerton, who is identified with the firm 
of George E. Cockerton & Son, Danville, is numbered 
among the highly successful business men of Vermilion 
County. He was born in this city, July 26, 1877, the son 
of George E. and Lillian (Jack) Cockerton. 

George E. Cockerton was born at Dundee, Illinois. He 
learned the printer's trade when a young man and in 1864 
came to Danville, locating here with his parents, John C. 
and Hannah (Pate) Cockerton. The family is of English 
lineage and representatives of the name came from Eng- 
land to America, locating first in Chicago, and later at 
Elgin, Illinois. They came to the United States in 1849. 
George E. Cockerton was educated in Danville, being a 
student at the local high school under Professor Spellman. 
He was employed in the offices of the Danville Plain 
Dealer, and later was connected with the Danville Times. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 647 

Mr. Cockerton became an expert printer and was put in 
charge of the newspaper plant of the Danville Times. He 
later became the business manager of the "Enterprise" 
and was in charge of the plant. He spent several years 
in Indianapolis and in 1877 returned to Danville, where 
he assumed complete charge of "The Times." Two years 
later he formed a partnership with F. E. Bowman but the 
business was sold in 1881. Later, Mr. Cockerton estab- 
lished a job office and conducted it for four years. He 
then became business manager for the Press Company. 
In 1889 he established an exclusive job and book business 
and two years later his son became a partner in the busi- 
ness. In 1898 Mr. Cockerton added a book binding depart- 
ment and stamp manufacturing plant. 

Mr. Cockerton married in 1876 Miss Lillian E. Jack, 
the daughter of Matthew W. and Ann (Sackett) Jack, of 
Centerville, Indiana, both now deceased. Mrs. Cockerton 
died in August, 1923, and is buried in Springhill Cemetery, 
Danville. 

Herbert E. Cockerton attended the public and high 
schools of Danville and throughout his business career has 
been identified with his father's printing and book bind- 
ing plant. Since January 1, 1900, the business has been 
known as George E. Cockerton & Son. Its activities extend 
throughout Vermilion County. 

In 1901 Mr. Cockerton married Miss Lola G. Young, 
the daughter of C. M. and Alice W. (Welsheimer) Young, 
of Thorntown, Indiana, both deceased. Their daughter, 
Mary Alice Cockerton, attended Danville High School, and 
now lives at home. 

Politically, Mr. Cockerton is a Republican. He is a 
member of the First Presbyterian Church and Rotary 
Club. His lodge affiliations are: Anchor Lodge, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, No. 980, charter member; Ver- 
milion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 82; Danville 
Council, Royal and Select Masters, No. 37; Athlestan Com- 



648 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

mandery, Knights Templar, No. 45; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; and is Past Most Wise Master of 
Gil W. Barnard Chapter Rose Croix, eighteenth degree; 
Goa Grotto; Mohammed Shrine; Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, No. 332; Knights of Pythias, No. 84; 
Modern Woodmen of America. 



Charles P. Nelson. — Prominent in business and finan- 
cial circles in Danville, Charles P. Nelson, president of 
the First National Bank, has played an integral part in the 
growth of his city. He is a native of New York, born at 
Spencer, Tioga County, March 18, 1863, the son of David 
and Clarissa (Watson) Nelson. 

Both David Nelson and his wife were natives of Tioga 
County, New York, born in 1823 and 1825 respectively. 
He attended college and became a dentist. In later life he 
lived at Covington and Attica, Indiana, and in 1870 settled 
at Danville, where he engaged in practice until his death 
in 1896. His wife died in 1880. Both are buried in Spring 
Hill Cemetery, Danville. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson had four 
children ; Clarence ; Clara, married F. Miller ; Minnie, mar- 
ried Charles Newman; and Charles P., the subject of this 
sketch. All are deceased except Charles P. 

After completing his education in the public schools 
of Danville, Charles P. Nelson became a clerk in the dry 
goods store of William Mann & Company. He later be- 
came bookkeeper and in 1885 became identified with the 
First National Bank as exchange teller and correspond- 
ent. He subsequently was assistant cashier and in 1912 
was elected cashier. He has served as president of the 
First National Bank since July 1, 1928. 

In 1888 Mr. Nelson married Miss Cora N. Anderson, 
of Danville, the daughter of William Anderson. She died 
in 1921 and is buried in Spring Hill Cemetery. To Mr. 




CHARLES P. NELSON 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 649 

and Mrs. Nelson were born three children : Edna and Don- 
ald, both deceased; and Charles L., born in 1898. He at- 
tended Danville High School and was graduated from St. 
John's Military Academy in 1917. He enlisted in the Fifth 
Illinois Regiment and was sent to Springfield, Illinois. He 
served throughout the World War and was stationed at 
Newport News. He has remained in the service and at 
present is located at Governor's Island, N. Y. He holds 
the rank of sergeant. 

Mr. Nelson is a member of St. James Methodist Epis- 
copal Church and is a thirty-second degree Mason and a 
member of the Elks Club, Knights of Pythias, and Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is a charter member of the Half 
Century Club, having lived in Danville for fifty-nine years. 
He is a Republican. 



Herman E. Douglas, cashier of the Second National 
Bank of Danville, and also president of the First National 
Bank of Catlin, is numbered among the leading financiers 
of Vermilion County. He was born at Catlin, Illinois, Jan- 
uary 11, 1886, the son of Winfield Scott and Elizabeth 
(Clark) Douglas. 

Winfield Scott Douglas spent his entire life at Catlin, 
Illinois, and died there January 19, 1908. He was a farmer 
in early life, later served as school teacher, and from 1904 
until 1908 was cashier of the First National Bank of 
Catlin. His wife died in July, 1913. Both are buried in 
Oakridge Cemetery, Catlin. Their children were : Thomas 
W., lives at Denver, Colorado; Dora Gibson, deceased; 
Chloe Matthews, lives at Belief ontaine, Ohio; Ethel Jones, 
lives at 1510 Franklin Street, Danville; Carroll Douglas, 
deceased; and Herman E., the subject of this sketch. 

Herman E. Douglas has been identified with banking 
interests throughout his life. Following his schooling at 



650 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Catlin and Danville, he attended Millikin University, De- 
catur, Illinois, for two years. He became assistant cashier 
of the First National Bank of Catlin in 1905 and served 
in that capacity until 1917, at which time he was elected 
cashier. From that date until 1925 he was cashier and in 
the latter year was elected president of the institution. 
Mr. Douglas became cashier of the Second National Bank 
of Danville on January 1, 1929. 

Mr. Douglas was married on June 7, 1911, to Miss Cath- 
erine Taylor, of Catlin, the daughter of Thomas A. and 
Mary (Acre) Taylor, natives of Illinois. Mr. Taylor died 
May 28, 1925, and his wife died October 27, 1927. Both are 
buried in Oakridge Cemetery, Catlin. Mr. and Mrs. Doug- 
las have an only child, John Allen, born January 26, 1917. 

In politics Mr. Douglas is identified with the Republican 
party and is a precinct committeeman, also member of the 
executive committee of Vermilion County. He has held 
the offices of town clerk and school treasurer of Catlin 
Township. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and affiliated with Catlin Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; and 
Kiwanis Club. 



James W. Hunter, who is vice president of the R. Mc- 
Calman Company, Inc., and the Material and Fuel Com- 
pany, was born at Zanesville, Ohio, January 22, 1881, the 
son of Joseph Allen and Margaret Ellen (Williamson) 
Hunter. 

Joseph Allen Hunter was born in Miami County, Ohio, 
in 1850, the son of James W. and M. (Irving) Hunter. 
James W. Hunter was a native of Miami County, Ohio, 
and his wife was born in the northern part of Ireland. 
Both are deceased and are buried at Piqua, Ohio. Their 
son, Joseph Allen Hunter, spent his boyhood on his father's 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 651 

farm and early in life entered the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company in the offices at Zanesville. He 
was serving as chief clerk to the general freight and pas- 
senger agent at the time of his death in 1919. He was a 
Republican, a member of the Presbyterian Church ; Amity 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Past Master; 
Garfield Commandery, Knights Templar. His wife was 
born at Zanesville, Ohio, and died in 1922. She was the 
daughter of David and Eliza Williamson, the former a 
native of Scotland and the latter of Kentucky. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Hunter were born two children: James W., the 
subject of this sketch; and Edna, lives at Danville. 

James W. Hunter attended the public schools of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, and was graduated with the degree of Civil 
Engineer from Ohio State University in 1904. He then 
became associated with the Pennsylvania Railroad at 
Terre Haute, Indiana, and later with the Chicago & East- 
ern Illinois Railroad in the chief engineer's office at Chi- 
cago. The following year he was transferred to Salem, 
Illinois, as assistant division engineer. In 1906, Mr. Hunter 
was sent to Evansville, Indiana, as division engineer and 
in 1911 he returned to Salem, Illinois, in the same capacity. 
He came to Danville in 1915 in the same capacity for the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad, but resigned his posi- 
tion in 1920 to enter the business in which he is now 
engaged. 

In 1910 Mr. Hunter married Miss Harriette Townley, 
the daughter of H. P. and Nellie (Graham) Townley, 
natives of Ohio, both now deceased. They are buried at 
Terre Haute, Indiana, where Mr. Townley was a success- 
ful hardware merchant. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter have two 
daughters, Margaret Ellen and Harriette Townley, both 
students. 

Mr. Hunter holds membership in the First Presbyterian 
Church, Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, No. 38, Young Men's Christian Association, 



652 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Rotary Club, and Danville Country Club. He is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce and vice president of the 
Allied Construction Industry Council. Politically, Mr. 
Hunter is a Republican. 



William H. Debenham, who is general secretary of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, Danville, was born 
in Grundy County, Iowa, January 23, 1880, the son of 
William and Martha (Hunting) Debenham. 

William Debenham was a native of Brooklyn, New 
York. He was a farmer in early life and lived for a num- 
ber of years at Adeline, Illinois. Later, he lived in Grundy 
County, Iowa, where he farmed until 1889. He then moved 
to Everly, Clay County, Iowa, and while a resident of that 
place engaged in the general merchandise business. He 
went to Arapahoe, Nebraska, in 1909, where he remained 
until the time of his death in December, 1917. He is buried 
at Araphoe, Nebraska, and his first wife died in 1884, and 
is buried in Grundy County, Iowa. Children born to this 
union were: William H., the subject of this sketch; and 
Charles L., born May 17, 1881, lives in Colorado. On May 
27, 1886, William Debenham married Miss Edna F. Middle- 
kauff. She died in November, 1927, and is buried at Glen- 
dale, California. 

William H. Debenham was reared in Grundy County, 
Iowa, and attended the public schools of Everly, Iowa. He 
was graduated from Morningside College, Sioux City, 
Iowa, in 1905. In that year he entered Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association work at Ottumwa, Iowa. He served as 
general secretary at Burlington, Iowa, from 1908 until 
1917; as associate general secretary at Camden, New Jer- 
sey, from 1917 until 1918; and has been general secretary 
at Danville since 1918. In 1911 Mr. Debenham raised 
money for the New Young Men's Christian Association 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 653 

building at Burlington, Iowa, the total being one hundred 
thousand dollars. 

On September 12, 1906, Mr. Debenham married Miss 
Evva C. Erskine, of Chicago, the daughter of L. R. and 
Adella V. (Rogers) Erskine. Mr. Erskine is a successful 
business man and lives in Chicago. Adella V. Erskine died 
May 21, 1887. Mr. Erskine married the second time to 
Miss Mary Hepperly. To Mr. and Mrs. Debenham were 
born five children: Elizabeth, Roger, Stuart, David, and 
Theodore, all at home. 

Mr. Debenham is a Republican. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and Rotary Club, of which he 
is secretary. 



Colfax T. Martin has been a practicing attorney in Dan- 
ville for the past twenty years. The years of his early 
manhood were spent largely as a teacher in his native state 
of Indiana. His reputation is that of an able lawyer and 
a popular and useful citizen. He was born near Adams, 
Decatur County, Indiana, September 24, 1873. 

The Martin family is of English ancestry and was 
established in Virginia before the War of the Revolution. 
His grandfather, John Martin, was born in Harrison Coun- 
ty, Kentucky, lived there until middle life, and then moved 
to the vicinity of Greensburg, Indiana, where he followed 
farming until his death. He married Nancy Martin, of a 
distinguished family of that name, also a native of Ken- 
tucky. Their son, Ralph Martin, was born near Greens- 
burg, Indiana, in 1834, and spent practically all his life in 
that section, becoming a substantial farmer. Late in life 
he retired to Indianapolis and died in that city in 1914. 
He was a Republican, a member of the Methodist Church, 
and the Masonic fraternity. His wife, Eva Tevis, was born 
near Moscow, Indiana, in 1849, and died at Lawrence in 
that state in 1907. She was the daughter of Thomas and 



654 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mirza Tevis, her parents also being natives of Harrison 
County, Kentucky. She was of Scotch descent and her 
people were scholars and chiefly connected with the learned 
professions. Many of her people occupied high positions 
in the law or ministry or were engaged in University or 
Governmental work. Colfax T. Martin was the oldest of 
their children. The others were: Luther S. Martin, 
Principal Central High School, Muncie, Indiana; Rev. 
Charles P. Martin, Pastor United Brethren Church, In- 
dianapolis, Indiana; John E. Martin, farmer near Carlyle, 
Montana; Rev. Otto T. Martin, District Superintendent of 
the Crawfordsville District, North Western Indiana Con- 
ference of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Rev. Ottis T. 
Martin, Pastor Simpson Memorial Methodist Episcopal 
Church, at Fort Wayne, Indiana; Eva, married Harry W. 
Hasewinkle, lives at Indianapolis; and Marquis E. Martin, 
died at Cayuga, Indiana, at the age of twenty-three years. 
The father of these children, by his first marriage, had a 
son, Ralph E. Martin, who was a farmer. He died at 
Rushville, Indiana, in 1918. 

Colfax T. Martin spent his early life on a farm in De- 
catur County, Indiana, and was educated in the public 
schools. He was graduated from Clarksburg High School 
in 1891 and for three years taught in Rush County, Indi- 
ana, in the intervals of his teaching attending the Central 
Normal College in Indiana, where he was graduated in 
1894. For a year he was Principal of the high school at 
Milroy, Indiana, and in 1897 was graduated with a pro- 
fessional Life State License as a teacher from the Indiana 
State Normal School at Terre Haute, Indiana. While at 
the State Normal he was editor of the Normal Advance, 
the college paper there. Then for a year he was superin- 
tendent of schools at LaFollette, Tennessee, and for seven 
years superintendent of schools at Cayuga, Indiana. Teach- 
ing supplied him means to complete his higher education 
and in 1907 he was graduated from the Indiana University 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 655 

at Bloomington, Indiana, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He took his law course in Indiana University and 
in the Indiana Law School, of the law department of the 
University of Indianapolis, and was graduated in 1909, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and was admitted to 
the bar both in Indiana and Illinois and in the United 
States Courts the same year. His work in the law school 
was of such character that he was awarded honorable men- 
tion by the college authorities on the date of his gradua- 
tion. In 1909 Mr. Martin came to Danville and established 
a private practive in this city. From 1915 until 1921 he 
was a member of the city council of Danville, in which 
body he served as chairman of the Ordinance Committee, 
the Finance Committee and other important committees. 

On December 25, 1900, Mr. Martin was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Ruth Patrick, who comes of a very promi- 
nent and highly respected family. She is the daughter of 
Thomas Patrick and Thamar E. Patrick, of Cayuga, Indi- 
ana, both now deceased. They have three children : Delia 
F., a graduate of the Danville High School and a student at 
the DePauw University, of Greencastle, Indiana, and the 
John Herron Art Institute of Indianapolis, Indiana; 
Thamar E., also a graduate of the Danville High School, 
and a student at DePauw University, at the University of 
Illinois, and now a teacher in the Danville, Illinois, city 
schools; and Colfax T., Jr., now eleven years old. 

Mr. Martin is a Republican and a member of Saint 
James Methodist Episcopal Church. He is affiliated with 
Olive Branch, Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Vermilion Chapter, No. 82, Royal Arch Masons; 
Athelstan Commandery, Knights Templar, No. 45, and 
Damascus Lodge, No. 84, Knights of Pythias. He is identi- 
fied with the Vermilion County Bar Association, Illinois 
State Bar Association, American Bar Association and the 
American Branch of the International Law Association. 



656 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

William F. Baura, for fifty years was actively engaged 
in the drug business at Danville, and still looks after a 
wide diversity of interests, including public office. He is 
one of the senior business men and citizens of Vermilion 
County. 

He v/as born over the Indiana line in Fountain County, 
at Covington, February 5, 1848. The Baum family came 
from Germany and settled in Pennsylvania in Colonial 
times. His grandfather, Jonas Baum, a native of Ohio, 
was a soldier in the War of 1812. About 1825 he settled at 
Covington, Indiana, being one of the pioneers of Fountain 
County, and helped develop a farm and home out of the 
wilderness. He lived there until his death. His wife was 
Elizabeth Steely, a native of Ohio, who also died in the 
homestead at Covington. Their son, Abner Baum, was 
born in Ohio, in 1819, was about six years of age when 
taken to Indiana ; was reared and married there, and spent 
the greater part of his active life as one of the leading 
farmers in that community. He began voting as a whig 
and later became a republican, and was a strong and ar- 
dent member of the Baptist Church. He finally moved to 
Nebraska, and died at Rising City, that state, in 1906. His 
wife, Eliza Hull, was born in Ohio, in 1840, and died at 
Rising City in 1906. Their children consisted of the fol- 
lowing : William F. ; Jonas, a druggist who died at Osce- 
ola, Nebraska, in 1891 ; James, a druggist living at Omaha, 
Nebraska; Daniel, who was a business man and died at 
Osceola, Nebraska, in 1888; Emma, wife of Frank Scott, 
a druggist at Rising City, Nebraska; and Oliver S., a min- 
ister of the Presbyterian Church at Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

William F. Baum had a farm rearing at Covington, 
attending country schools and town schools, and also the 
Baptist College at Ladoga, Indiana. Leaving college at 
the age of twenty-two, he had previously taught a term of 
school in the winter of 1869 in Warren County, Indiana. 




WILLIAM F. BALM 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 657 

In 1870 he entered the drug store at Covington, and by a 
hard working service apprenticeship learned every element 
in the profession and business of a druggist. In 1872 he 
acquired at Marshfield, Indiana, a branch store owned by 
the firm of Board, Gish & Company, and remained in busi- 
ness there until 1875. In the meantime, on November 1, 
1874, he had established a drug store at Danville, the fifth 
store of that kind in the little city, and after 1875, when 
he sold his Marshfield store, he gave all his attention to the 
store at Danville. He was the leading druggist in the city 
for over fifty years, until he retired and sold out his store 
in 1920. He has had a prominent part in raising the stand- 
ards of the drug business in Illinois, serving one year as 
president of the Illinois State Pharmaceutical Association, 
and in September, 1897, helped organize the National As- 
sociation of Druggists at St. Louis, being the Illinois Dele- 
gate at the convention. Mr. Baum during 1897-98 erected 
one of the first modern office buildings in Danville known 
as the Baum Building, a seven-story structure at 41-43 
North Vermilion Street. He still owns this building, and 
has his offices there. He has another business building, 
occupied by five stores at the corner of Main and North 
Jackson streets, and a three-story building at 20-22 West 
Main Street, and much other property, including his at- 
tractive home at 318 North Vermilion Street. He is presi- 
dent of the Pioneer Oil, Gas and Refining Company of San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Mr. Baum is serving his tenth consecutive year as a 
member of the Board of Supervisors in Vermilion County. 
He was for four years a member of the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Danville. Mr. Baum was elected twice to 
the city council, and while a member of this body intro- 
duced a resolution taking into Greater Danville the suburbs 
of Germantown, South Danville and Rose Lawn, incor- 
porated villages, making six altogether, and by this action 
automatically increased the population of Danville by 

8— Vol. 2 



658 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

eight hundred people. Mr. Baum is a republican, a mem- 
ber of St. James Methodist Episcopal Church, and is affili- 
ated with Olive Branch Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; Vermilion Chapter No. 82, Royal Arch 
Masons; Athlestan Commandery No. 45, Knights Templar; 
Danville Consistory of the Scottish Rite; and is a thirty- 
second degree Mason. He is also a member of Danville 
Lodge No. 332, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; 
the Danville Chamber of Commerce and is a member of the 
Danville Country Club. 

Mr. Baum married in September, 1874, at Marshfield, 
Indiana, Miss Louisa A. Johnson, who was born in that 
locality. She died at Danville in 1905. The only child of 
this marriage was Clarence Henry, who graduated from 
the Danville High School; from the University of Michi- 
gan in the pharmacy and chemistry department, and for 
twenty years was actively associated with his father in the 
drug business. He is now superintendent of the Lake View 
Hospital of Danville. Mr. Baum, on February 2, 1917, 
at Sandusky, Ohio, married Miss Bertha L. Levensburger, 
who was born in that Ohio city. She died at Danville, No- 
vember 22, 1922. 



Clint L. Sandusky, deceased, was a veteran business 
man of Danville, where he was identified with the San- 
dusky Furniture Company as president. He was born at 
Catlin, Illinois, September 30, 1871, and died in Danville, 
August 26, 1921. He is buried in Springhill Cemetery. 

Clint Sandusky was the son of Jacob and Mary Jane 
(Gones) Sandusky. Jacob Sandusky was a native of Ken- 
tucky and his wife was born in Ohio. Mr. Sandusky was 
a farmer and well known as a breeder of pure bred stock. 
He came to Illinois when a child with his parents, his 
father being Isaiah Sandusky. The family became promi- 
nent residents of Catlin and were substantial citizens. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 659 

Jacob Sandusky died in 1884 and his wife died in 1906. 
Both are buried at Catlin, Illinois. Mr. Sandusky was a 
Republican and a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
To Jacob and Mary Jane (Gones) Sandusky were born 
three children : Effie, married John Keeslar, attorney, de- 
ceased, and she lives in Danville; Viola, married W. A. 
Balsley, lives in Danville; and Clint L., the subject of this 
sketch. 

The education of Clint L. Sandusky was received in 
the public schools of Fairmount, Illinois, and his boyhood 
was spent on his father's farm. In 1896 he came to Dan- 
ville, where he became associated with the clothing firm of 
L. Piatt & Son. Later he was identified with Owen Pixley 
& Company and in March, 1900, purchased the interests 
of C. H. Gones in the firm of C. H. Gones & Brother, furni- 
ture dealers. The business was thereafter known as Gones 
& Sandusky until 1901, at which time Mr. Sandusky became 
sole owner. The business was incorporated on September 
1, 1919, under the name of the Sandusky Furniture Store, 
and Mr. Sandusky became president. His wife served as 
secretary and treasurer until the death of her husband in 
1921, at which time she became president. She continues 
to carry out the straightforward business policies of her 
late husband and has met with unusual success in her 
business undertaking. The Sandusky Furniture Store is 
the largest business of its kind in the State of Illinois and 
owes its merited success to the fact that its owners have 
always insisted upon maintaining the highest possible qual- 
ity in their merchandise. 

On October 5, 1892, Mr. Sandusky was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sara Marble, the daughter of Jacob and 
Susan (Rogers) Marble, natives of Indiana. Mr. Marble 
was a successful farmer and grain dealer. He was a Re- 
publican and served as justice of the peace. He held mem- 
bership in the Christian Church. He died in 1914 and his 
wife died in 1888. Both are buried in Atherton Cemetery, 



660 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

near Danville. Their children were: W. A., who died 
October 13, 1925, was treasurer of the Huber Manufactur- 
ing Company, Marion, Ohio; Sara Sandusky; and Lela, 
married Fred Hughes, of Danville. She died in 1910. To 
Clint L. and Sara (Marble) Sandusky were born two 
children: Clinton D., born in 1912, graduate of Danville 
High School ; and Nina, born in 1894, died in infancy. 

Mr. Sandusky was affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge 
No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Vermilion 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 82; Danville Council, 
Royal and Select Masters; Athlestan Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Ansar Temple; and Danville Consistory. 
In 1911 he was crowned a thirty-third degree Mason at 
Boston, Massachusetts, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. 
He was very active in Masonic circles, being District Dep- 
uty Grand Lecturer for many years, and he was largely 
instrumental in bringing to Danville the local consistory. 
He was a trustee on the Danville Consistory Building Com- 
mittee. He was also affiliated with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, No. 332. He was vice president 
of the Chamber of Commerce, a director of the Webster 
Home for Aged Women, and a director of Lakeview Hos- 
pital from 1907 until 1921. 

Mr. Sandusky was always among the first to offer his 
assistance in civic and charitable movements and while he 
was interested in many philanthropic projects and enjoyed 
doing good work, few people knew of his activities in this 
channel. 

Mrs. Sara Sandusky is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce and belongs to the Altrusa Club. She has served 
for the past five years as treasurer of the Board of Man- 
agers of the Webster Home for Aged Women. She ranks 
among the leading women in the social, civic, and business 
life of Danville and has a wide acquaintance throughout 
Vermilion County. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 661 

Clarence S. Dickson, associated with the firm of Ed- 
mund & Dickson, morticians, is among the substantial 
young business men of Danville. He was born near 
Fithian, Vermilion County, January 8, 1894, the son of 
Hiram Catlin and Dora Ellen (Ward) Dickson. 

Hiram Catlin Dickson, deceased, was a native of Illi- 
nois. He was the son of Dr. Simon A. Dickson, who served 
throughout the Civil War as a captain in the Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He died while in service. His son, Hiram 
C, became a successful farmer of Vermilion County and 
was the owner of four hundred and eighty acres of well 
improved land. He died in 1908 and his wife, a native of 
Ohio, died in 1909. Both are buried in Stearns Cemetery, 
Fithian. She was the daughter of Charles C. Ward, a 
native of Ohio, and an earlier settler of Vermilion County. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Dickson six children were born: Bert, 
deceased; Earl W., lives at Mason City, Iowa; James P., 
lives near Catlin, Illinois; Simon A., lives at Gray's Lake, 
Illinois; Franklin Harrison lives at Wauconda, Illinois; 
and Clarence S., the subject of this sketch. 

Clarence S. Dickson received his early education in the 
schools of Vermilion County and attended Illinois Univer- 
sity preparatory school. He went to Chicago in 1912 and 
studied at the Barnes School of Sanitary Science and Em- 
balming. Following his graduation he came to Danville 
where he was employed in the funeral home of Turner & 
Gilmore. In 1914 he went to South Bend, Indiana, with 
Finch & Sprague, but the following year returned to Dan- 
ville where he was connected with the Gilmore Funeral 
Home until 1919. The next two years were spent with the 
Pape Funeral Home and Mr. Dickson again returned to 
the employ of Mr. Gilmore until 1925. At that time he pur- 
chased the interest of J. W. Turner in the firm of Turner & 
Edmund, and the business has since been known as Ed- 
mund & Dickson. This modern funeral home is located at 
440 North Vermilion Street. 



662 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On January 14, 1915, Mr. Dickson married Miss Mary- 
Belle Scott, the daughter of Charles and Agnes (Noble) 
Scott, both deceased. They have two daughters, Margaret 
Delores, born October 24, 1915; and Barbara Jean, born 
March 20, 1925. 

Politically Mr. Dickson is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the First Baptist Church and a charter member of 
Further Light Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
No. 1130; and Palatine Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
No. 226. 



Carey B. Hall. — One of the best known business men 
of Danville is Carey B. Hall, who is president of the Dan- 
ville Transfer & Storage Company. He was born at 
Homer, Champaign County, Illinois, November 17, 1879, 
the son of Levi M. and Mary F. (Patterson) Hall. 

Levi M. Hall was born in Butler County, Ohio, June 19, 
1827, and died September 5, 1919. He was the son of Frost 
Hugh and Maria (Meade) Hall, natives of Hamilton, Ohio. 
He was a school teacher, lawyer and farmer, and was also 
proprietor of the hotel at "Halls Locks." He was inter- 
ested in canal boats extensively. Mr. Hall later settled at 
Eugene, Indiana. He died in 1848 and is buried in Butler 
Cemetry, near Newport, Indiana. He was prominent in 
Masonic circles during the early days. Levi M. Hall, 
father of the subject of this sketch, spent his boyhood on 
a farm and after removing to Eugene, Indiana, followed 
the blacksmith trade. He also owned a shop later at 
Homer, Illinois, which he operated for a period of twenty 
years. In later life Mr. Hall farmed. He retired in 1898 
and lived at Homer, Illinois, until his death in 1919. He 
was a Republican and for seventeen years served as com- 
missioner of highways in Homer Township. He held mem- 
bership in the Methodist Church, of which he was a deacon. 
Mary F. (Patterson) Hall was born near Homer, Illinois, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 663 

December 13, 1847, and died March 1, 1928. Both she and 
her husband are buried at Homer. She was the daughter 
of Thomas Patterson, a native of Saint Joseph, Illinois. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Hall were born five children: Charles 
Allen, deceased; Carl, deceased; Ada, married Edward 
Beazley, lives at Danville; Laura A., married Ernest Fox, 
lives at Bloomington, Illinois; and Carey B., the subject of 
this sketch. 

Carey B. Hall attended the public schools of Allerton 
and Homer, Illinois, and in 1899 was graduated from 
Brown's Business College. After leaving school he went 
to Chicago for Carson, Pierie & Scott Company, dry goods 
merchants. In 1900 he removed to Danville, where he 
became associated with the Danville Transfer & Storage 
Company as bookkeeper. In 1903 he purchased an interest 
in the business and eight years later, when the company 
was incorporated, Mr. Hall became president. He pur- 
chased the remaining stock in 1927 and is now sole owner 
of the business, which is located at 12 College Street. 

In 1902 Mr. Hall was united in marriage with Miss Lil- 
lian M. Poage, the daughter of Porterfield and Anna 
(Clemens) Poage, of Homer, Illinois, now residents of 
Danville. They have a son, Melvin P. Hall, born December 
16, 1903. He was married in 1921 to Miss Mildred McClain, 
and they have a daughter, Lillian L. Hall, born August 23, 
1923. Mr. Hall is associated in business with his father. 
He is a graduate of Danville High School, and attended the 
University of Illinois. 

Mr. Hall is a Republican, a member of the First Pres- 
byterian Church, Danville Country Club, and Roselawn 
Country Club. His fraternal affiliations are as follows: 
Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
No. 38; Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 82; 
Danville Council, Royal and Select Masters, No. 37; Athel- 
stan Commandery, Knights Templar, No. 45; Danville Con- 
sistory, thirty-second degree; Past Sovereign Prince of 



664 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Council Princes of Jerusalem; Past Most Wise Master of 
Chapter Rose Croix, First Lieutenant Commander of the 
Consistory; Gao Grotto, Monarch; and on September 21, 
1926, he was crown a thirty-third degree Mason at Buffalo, 
New York, in the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. He is 
also a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332. 



Maj. Gen. Oscar Philip Yeager, deceased, was a promi- 
nent figure in the business life of Danville for many years. 
He was born in this city, October 25, 1866, the son of 
Magnus and Hannah (Campbell) Yeager. 

Magnus Yeager was born in Germany and was a lad 
of fourteen years when he emigrated to the United States 
with his parents. They settled on a farm near Decatur, 
Indiana. He was a Civil War veteran, having enlisted 
with an Indiana Cavalry Regiment. His wife was born 
near Campbell's Station, Illinois. Both are buried in 
Springhill Cemetery, Danville. 

Oscar Philip Yeager was educated in the public schools 
of Danville and was a graduate of Danville Seminary. He 
engaged in the contract business in his teens, with his 
father, the late Magnus Yeager, under the firm name of 
M. Yeager & Son. He remained with his father until 1892, 
when he formed a partnership with Charles F. Schultz, 
under the firm name of Charles F. Schultz & Company. 
Their operations extended outside the city of Danville. The 
Piano Manufacturing Company of Piano, Illinois, erected 
in West Pullman, and which is now a part of the Interna- 
tional Harvester Company, was among the first large con- 
tracts handled by the new firm. In 1893 they had the con- 
tract for the basement of the Federal Building on Harrison 
and Vermilion streets. In 1893-94-95 they built the new 
building of the College of Engineering at the University 
of Illinois. Magnus Yeager then entered the firm and the 




&f^U^^t^- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 665 

name was changed to Yeager & Schultz. Courthouses were 
erected at Monticello, Clinton and Paris, Illinois, and one 
at Sparta, Wisconsin. With the retirement of Mr. Schultz 
the firm became known as Yeager & Son. The Federal 
building at Hot Springs, Arkansas, was then built by the 
company. 

Some of the largest post office and custom house build- 
ings were erected by Yeager & Son, one of the largest be- 
ing at Newport, Rhode Island. Among the important 
buildings erected at Danville were the Federal Building, 
Court House, First National Bank Building, Baum Build- 
ing, Elks Club, Washington School, and the last important 
contract handled by General Yeager was the Memorial 
Bridge on Gilbert Street over the Vermilion River. Mr. 
Yeager died February 28, 1923. 

General Yeager married Martha E. Smith, the daugh- 
ter of David John and Ellen (Conlin) Smith, pioneers of 
Tilton, Illinois. Both are deceased and buried in Spring- 
hill Cemetery, Danville. Mrs. Yeager died in 1895, leav- 
ing three children: 0. K., a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this history; Phyllis, married Drew Tenbroeck, 
lives at Hinsdale, Illinois; and Ralph 0., lives at Terre 
Haute, Indiana. On March 5, 1902, Mr. Yeager married 
Miss Grace Dillon, a native of Danville, Illinois, where she 
now resides. 

General Yeager's military record in national guard cir- 
cles in Illinois was unequaled in Vermilion County. He 
enlisted as a private in Battery A, Artillery Battalion, 
June 1, 1883, at the age of seventeen years. He received 
his discharge February 4, 1887, and re-enlisted August 10, 
1889, receiving a commission as first lieutenant, Novem- 
ber 18, 1889. In January, 1890, he was promoted to cap- 
tain and on January 28, 1901, became a major. General 
Yeager retired October 6, 1910, and was placed on the re- 
tired list as Lieutenant Colonel, being transferred to the 
National Guard Reserve March 6, 1917. He assisted in 



666 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

the reorganization of the Illinois National Guard to re- 
place the companies that had been sent into active service 
in the World War. He remained in command until June 
22, 1921, when he was promoted to Brigadier General of 
the Sixty-fifth Infantry Brigade, Thirty-third Division. 
He retired from service June 9, 1922, with the rank of 
Major General. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish- American War, Captain 
Yeager led Battery A, First Illinois Field Artillery, United 
States Volunteers, and served in Porto Rico. 

General Yeager was a life long Republican and always 
took an active interest in politics. He was a member of 
Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
No. 38; Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons No. 82; 
Athelstan Commandery, Knights Templar No. 35; Dan- 
ville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple; and 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks No. 332. He was 
also a member of United Spanish War Veterans, Camp 
Egbert No. 1, charter member; and an honor member of 
Jewell White Post No. 728, Veterans of Foreign Wars. 



Col. O. K. Yeager. — An energetic and successful busi- 
ness man of Danville, whose career has been steadily up- 
ward and marked by progressiveness from the first, is 
Col. 0. K. Yeager, who is identified with Yeager & Son. 
He began his business experience with his honored father, 
who was also one of Danville's highly regarded business 
men. 

Colonel Yeager was born in Danville, February 5, 1888, 
the son of Major General Oscar Philip and Martha E. 
(Smith) Yeager. A complete sketch of Maj. Gen. Oscar 
Philip Yeager appears elsewhere in this history. 

0. K. Yeager obtained his early education in the public 
schools of Danville, and following his graduation from high 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 667 

school in 1906 he entered DePauw University. He subse- 
quently entered the University of Chicago, and in 1911 
was graduated from the University of Illinois with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. Mr. Yeager has since been 
identified with the interests of Yeager & Son, Danville, 
and in 1920 became a member of the firm. At the time of 
his father's death, February 28, 1923, Mr. Yeager became 
sole owner. 

In 1913 Mr. Yeager married Sara Hazel Brand, the 
daughter of Dr. E. P. and Vienna (Moore) Brand, natives 
of West Virginia. He was superintendent of Baptist Mis- 
sions at Normal, Illinois. He is deceased and his widow 
lives at Tucson, Arizona. Colonel and Mrs. Yeager have 
two children, Betty Ann and Philip Brand, both students. 

In 1905 Colonel Yeager enlisted in Battery A, First 
Field Artillery, but at the inception of Company I, Fifth 
Illinois Regiment, he transferred to that organization. 
Later, he became a member of Battery A, First Illinois 
Field Artillery. In June, 1917, he was transferred to 
Camp Meade, Maryland, and was there attached to an en- 
gineering corps, where he was commissioned a captain. He 
was subsequently sent to Camp Raritan, New Jersey, where 
he engaged in construction work, later being transferred 
to Frankfort Arsenal, as executive officer in charge of con- 
struction work. He served at Camp Knox, Louisville, 
Kentucky, in the same capacity and was discharged in 
July, 1919. He reorganized Company A, Fourth Illinois 
Infantry, National Guard, which was later federally recog- 
nized as Company D, One Hundred and Thirtieth Infantry, 
Thirty-third Division. He was commissioned captain, No- 
vember, 1920, and resigned in May, 1923. However, the 
following year he returned to the service as captain of 
Company D, One Hundred and Thirtieth Infantry, and in 
July, 1927, was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and at- 
tached to the Thirty-third Division Staff. 



668 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Politically, Colonel Yeager is a Republican. He is af- 
filiated with Anchor Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons No. 980, charter member; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple; "40 and 8" Society; 
Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Phi Delta 
T/heta fraternity; Kiwanis Club; and Danville Country 
Club. He is a member of the Western Society of Engi- 
neers, Society of American Military Engineers, and Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers. He has various business 
connections in Danville, being president of the Domestic 
Appliance Company, president of the Danville Lumber 
Company, and a director of the Western Indiana Gravel 
Company. 



John W. Speakman. — One of the best known of the 
younger lawyers of Vermilion County is John W. Speak- 
man, of Danville, who is serving as assistant United States 
District Attorney. He was born near Jamaica, Illinois, 
March 5, 1900. 

John W. Speakman was educated in the public schools 
of Danville. He was graduated from the University of 
Illinois, from which he received his degree in law in 1924. 
The following year he was admitted to the Illinois bar. He 
spent six months in Los Angeles, California, and then re- 
turned to Danville, where he became a member of the firm 
of Jewel and Speakman, being associated in practice with 
William Jewel, of Danville. Mr. Speakman was subse- 
quently admitted to practice in the Federal Courts. 

Mr. Speakman is a Republican and served as precinct 
committeeman of the first precinct, Third Ward, in 1926. 
He was elected secretary for the Vermilion County Re- 
publican Central Committee in April, 1926, and was ap- 
pointed assistant United States district attorney August 
23, 1926. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 669 

Mr. Speakman holds membership in Saint James Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, Delta Sigma Phi, Phi Delta Phi, 
and Delta Sigma Rho fraternities. He is also a member of 
the Vermilion County Bar Association and Illinois State 
Bar Association. He is affiliated with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; Olive Branch Lodge, 
No. 38, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons; Goa Grotto; 
and American Legion. 

During the World War Mr. Speakman served in the 
Student Army Training Corps at the University of Illinois. 
While a student at the university he was also a member 
of the debating team for three years. 



Cecil D. Steely. — One of the progressive young business 
men of Danville is found in Cecil D. Steely, who is identi- 
fied with the Danville Poster Advertising Company as 
manager. He is a native of Indiana, born at West Leb- 
anon, February 10, 1898, the son of William J. and Lilly R. 
(Ritchey) Steely. 

William J. Steely, retired, has spent his entire life in 
Indiana. He was born at West Lebanon in Warren Coun- 
ty, the son of George W. and Mary E. (Brenner) Steely. 
Both George W. Steely and his wife are deceased. George 
W. Steely was a leading agriculturist of Warren County, 
Indiana, and prominent in politics, having held various 
public offices at West Lebanon. His son, William J., fol- 
lowed general farming and stock raising throughout his 
active career. He specialized in the breeding of pure bred 
stock. Mr. Steely retired from his farm in 1923 and now 
lives at State Line, Indiana. His wife, born in Warren 
County, Indiana, died in July, 1923, and is buried at Mound 
Prairie, near Covington, Indiana. She was the daughter 
of Charles and Elizabeth Jane (Dixon) Ritchey, the former 
a native of Tennessee and the latter of Indiana. Mr. 



670 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Ritchey died in 1923 and his widow lives at State Line, In- 
diana. To Mr. and Mrs. William J. Steely was born one 
child, Cecil D., the subject of this sketch. 

William J. Steely is a Republican and a member of the 
Methodist Church. 

The boyhood of Cecil D. Steely was spent in Warren 
County, Indiana. Following his graduation from Rich- 
mond (Indiana) High School in 1916 he attended Earlham 
College. Mr. Steely began his business career as a sales- 
man for the Peabody-Houghteling Bond & Investment 
Company, of Chicago, Illinois, being identified with their 
Chicago, Illinois, offices. In 1917 he attended the Detroit 
Aeronautical School and completed the ground school 
course in October, 1918. He then came to Danville, where 
he has since been connected with the Danville Poster Ad- 
vertising Company as manager. He is also associated with 
the Haskell Sign System. 

Mr. Steely married in 1922 Miss Esther Haskell, daugh- 
ter of W. J. and Eva C. (Dudenhofer) Haskell. Mr. Has- 
kall is president of the Danville Poster Advertising Com- 
pany. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Steely are : Catherine 
Elizabeth, born in 1924 ; and William J., born in 1928. 

In politics Mr. Steely is identified with the Republican 
party. He is a member of the First Presbyterian Church, 
and Mound Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
No. 274. He also belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, 
Danville. 



Eugene S. Lamm is numbered among the energetic and 
successful young business men of Danville, where he is 
associated with the interests of E. C. Lamm & Company. 
He was born in this city, July 24, 1896, the son of Edward 
C. and Edith (Elliott) Lamm. 

Edward C. Lamm, deceased, was widely known in Dan- 
ville, where he was the founder of the business which bears 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 671 

his name. He was born in Danville in 1858. He went west 
early in life and lived on a ranch about thirty miles from 
Trinidad, Colorado. He later sold his interests and re- 
turned to Danville, where he established a lumber and mill- 
ing business in partnership with his brothers. This 
enterprise was begun in 1857 by William Lamm, father 
of Edward C. Lamm. Later, Edward C. Lamm purchased 
his brothers' interests and conducted the business success- 
fully until his death, April 3, 1922. The original plant was 
located at Hazel and North streets, and removed to its 
present location in 1909. Mr. Lamm was a Republican 
and held membership in the Presbyterian Church. His 
widow, born in San Francisco, California, now lives at 
Santa Barbara, California. Their children were: Mar- 
jorie, deceased; Ethel, married Louis Fisher, lives at Santa 
Barbara, California; Edith, lives at Santa Barbara, Cali- 
fornia; Wilford E., lives at Modoc Point, Oregon; Eugene 
S., the subject of this sketch; and Elsa, married Charles R. 
Ehlers, lives at Danville. 

Eugene S. Lamm received his schooling at Danville 
and was graduated from high school in 1915. He then 
went to Modoc Point, Oregon, where he was associated 
with his brother's lumber interests. In September, 1917, 
he enlisted in the Forestry Engineers from Oregon, Twen- 
tieth Engineers, Fourth Company. This outfit was sent to 
France in November, 1917, and saw active duty in the 
Vosges Mountains. Mr. Lamm was discharged from the 
service at Rockford, Illinois, in May, 1919. Upon his re- 
turn to Danville he became identified with his father's 
business and after the latter's death in 1922 he assumed 
full charge of the concern. They do general mill work, 
manufacturing frames, mouldings and various sundries. 
A large lumber yard is also owned and operated by E. C. 
Lamm & Company. 

In 1925 Mr. Lamm married Miss Katherine Mason, the 
daughter of Dr. F. R. and Katherine (Livengood) Mason. 



672 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

He is a prominent physician and surgeon of Danville. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lamm have a son, Edward C, born in 1927. 

Mr. Lamm is a Republican, and is affiliated with the 
Benevolent and Protectice Order of Elks, No. 332, Loyal 
Order of Moose, and American Legion. 

In 1928 to 1929 Mr. Lamm operated the Aerial Transit 
Company and has the only privately owned plane in Dan- 
ville. He and his wife are both licensed pilots. In 1929 
Mr. Lamm organized the Danville Flying Club. 



Everett Leslie Dalbey. — Prominent among the leading 
members of the Vermilion County Bar Association is Ev- 
erett Leslie Dalbey, who is engaged in the practice of his 
profession at Danville, with offices in the Adams Building. 
He was born in Oakwood Township, Vermilion County, 
May 10, 1889, the son of Verner R. and Sarah G. (Lucas) 
Dalbey. 

Verner R. Dalbey was born in Oakwood Township, Ver- 
milion County, near Newtown, May 8, 1856. He spent 
his boyhood on his father's farm and after his marriage, 
December 5, 1875, followed farming for several years. 
He then became interested in the mercantile business at 
Steam Corner, Indiana, and from there went to Muncie, 
Illinois, where he engaged in the grain and stock business. 
He also constructed a store and served as postmaster at 
Muncie. For several years he had charge of a fine tract 
of land, containing 1,000 acres, known as the "Fox Farm." 
Mr. Dalbey engaged in business at Muncie for a period of 
eighteen years. He died in August, 1925, and is buried 
in Stearns Cemetery, near Muncie. He was a Democrat, 
and a member of the Baptist Church, having served for 
twenty-seven years as Sunday school superintendent. He 
was honorary superintendent at the time of his death. Mr. 
Dalbey married Sarah G. Lucas, of Veedersburg, Indiana. 




&>, ^r^>ojuusi^ 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 673 

She now lives at Tilton, Illinois. The following children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dalbey: Robert F., lives in 
Chicago, Illinois; Herman S., lives at Tilton, Illinois; 
Myrtle, married M. R. Waddell, lives at Danville; Wil- 
bern A., lives at Robertsdale, Alabama ; Everett Leslie, the 
subject of this sketch; Beulah, deceased; Virgie, lives at 
Danville; and Kenneth, at home. 

Everett Leslie Dalbey grew up at Muncie, Illinois, 
where he attended the public schools. He also attended 
the Danville High School, the College of Literature and 
Arts at the University of Illinois, and was a member of 
the graduating class of 1913 of the Law School, University 
of Illinois, While there he also made records in scholar- 
ship and was awarded membership in the Order of Coif, 
honorary legal fraternity, during his senior year. Mr. 
Dalbey was admitted to practice at the Illinois bar in July, 
1913, and immediately came to Danville, where he was 
associated in practice with Rearick & Meeks for ten years. 
He then practiced alone for a short time before forming a 
partnership with ex- Judge Lawrence T. Allen, under the 
firm name of Allen & Dalbey. They have specialized 
mainly in corporation law. 

In September, 1909, Mr. Dalbey was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Leah G. Collett, daughter of Lemuel G. 
and Dora (McFarland) Collett, the former a native of 
Indiana and the latter of Illinois. Both are deceased and 
are buried at Oakwood, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Dalbey 
the following children were born : Dora Wintress Dalbey, 
who attends the University of Illinois; Beulah Marie, at- 
tends the Danville High School ; Sarah Henrietta, and Ev- 
erett Linden at home. 

Mr. Dalbey has always been a Democrat. He is a 
trustee of the First Baptist Church, and has been active 
in church work throughout his life. He is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; Phi 
Delta Phi fraternity; Exchange Club; Danville Country 

9— Vol. 2 



674 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Club; Young Men's Christian Association; and Chamber 
of Commerce. He is identified with the Vermilion County 
Bar Association and Illinois State Bar Association. 



Edward J. Ryan is numbered among the most progres- 
sive business men of Danville, where he is president of the 
E. J. Ryan Company, 117 North Walnut Street. He was 
born at Chillicothe, Illinois, July 16, 1867, the son of John 
and Elmira Jane (Goff) Ryan. 

John Ryan was a native of Kane County, Illinois, and 
his wife was born in New York. He grew up on his 
father's farm and at an early age became interested in 
bridge building, later becoming widely known as a bridge 
contractor. He died in 1882 and his wife died in 1923. 
Both are buried in the Masonic Cemetery, Streator, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Ryan was a Republican, a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church, Streator Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. There were three children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Ryan: Minnie, deceased; Edward J., the subject of 
this sketch ; and Charles, deceased. 

Edward J. Ryan was educated in the public schools of 
Chicago. As an apprentice plumber he served with the 
Mulford Plumbing Company, Streator, Illinois, and was 
identified with that company for a period of ten years. 
He then, in partnership with a Mr. Ferguson, established 
a plumbing business at Streator, which was continued for 
four years. In 1890 Mr. Ryan came to Danville and after 
a short time went to Aurora, Illinois, where he followed 
his trade and engaged in business. In 1893 he returned to 
Danville and established a business of his own, having pur- 
chased the plumbing establishment of W. A. Hill & Com- 
pany. The business was incorporated in 1918 and Mr. 
Ryan became president. Among the large and noteworthy 
contracts completed by the E. J. Ryan Company may be 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 675 

mentioned the following: Danville Hospital; National 
Soldiers Home; Danville High School; Lincoln School; 
Jackson School; Douglas School; Danville Consistory; 
Franklin School; Washington School; Grant School; Lake- 
view Hospital; Illinois Printing Company; Baum Building; 
Adams Building; Daniel Building; First National Bank; 
Second National Bank; Kankakee High School, Kankakee, 
Illinois; New York Central Railroad Office Building, Gib- 
son, Indiana; Lincoln Hall, University of Illinois, Cham- 
paign, Illinois; Indianola High School, Indianola, Illinois. 

Mr. Ryan married Miss Minnie M. Barr. Their daugh- 
ter, Helen, married William Auer, and lives at Rochester, 
New York. They have a daughter, Jean. 

Mr. Ryan is a Republican, and is affiliated with Olive 
Branch Lodge, No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Medinah Tem- 
ple; Gao Grotto; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
No. 332; Modern Woodmen of America; Rotary Club; 
Danville Country Club; and Chamber of Commerce. Mr. 
Ryan is identified with the Illinois State Master Plumbers 
Association and National Master Plumbers Association. 



Robert C. Songer. — Among the substantial business 
men and highly esteemed citizens of Danville may be men- 
tioned Robert C. Songer, who is identified with Houpt & 
Songer, of 207 South Street. He is a native of Vermilion 
County, born December 18, 1881, the son of William W. and 
Ella E. (Shore) Songer. 

William W. Songer was born in Vermilion County, In- 
diana, in 1857, the son of Lewis and Matilda (Lowe) 
Songer, both natives of Indiana. The Songer family re- 
moved to Vermilion County, Illinois, from Indiana about 
1865 and settled near Alvin, where they became prosperous 
farmers. William W., father of the subject of this sketch, 



676 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

was eight years old when his parents brought him to Alvin, 
Illinois. He learned the carpenter trade and followed that 
throughout his active career. In 1907 he retired and re- 
moved to Danville, where he died in 1915. He is buried in 
Bethel Cemetery, near Alvin, Illinois. Mr. Songer was a 
Republican and served as assessor of Ross Township for 
four terms. He was a member of the Church of Christ. 
Ella E. (Shore) Songer was born in Shelby County, Ohio, 
and came to Neoga, Illinois, with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Shore, when she was a very young girl. She now re- 
sides at Danville. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Songer: Maude, married Charles Darling, lives at Oak- 
land, California; Robert C, the subject of this sketch; 
Myrtle, married T. L. Cummins, lives at Catlin, Illinois; 
Lucile, married Robert Burow, lives at Joliet, Illinois; 
Joseph, lives at Lewistown, Montana; and Zora, married 
Benjamin Robinson, lives at Danville. 

The boyhood of Robert C. Songer was spent at Alvin, 
Illinois, where he attended the public schools. He was 
graduated from Brown's Business College in 1901. Mr. 
Songer learned carpentry in association with his father's 
business and from 1903 until 1905 was a building con- 
tractor in Indiana. In 1906 he came to Danville as man- 
ager of the Henry Taylor Lumber Company, at present 
the Alleth-Prouty Company. In 1912 he became manager 
of the City Coal Company, but two years later purchased 
a half interest from William R. Houpt in his building sup- 
ply business. This was a small organization in 1914 but 
today ranks as one of the largest houses of its kind in 
the city. 

In 1905 Mr. Songer married Miss Theresa M. Claypool, 
the daughter of Squire and Julia (Harrison) Claypool, of 
Danville. The former is deceased and the latter lives at 
Bismarck, Illinois. There are four children in the Songer 
family. Roberta, attends Jacksonville Women's College; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 677 

Glen Harrison, Robert Franklin, and John William, all 
students. 

Mr. Songer holds membership in Saint James Methodist 
Episcopal Church, is vice president of the Rotary Club, 
and a member of Further Light Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, No. 1130; Knights of Pythias; Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; and Loyal 
Order of Moose. Mr. Songer is a Republican. 



Clarence Edwin Wellman, who is serving his fourth 
term as clerk of the Circuit Court of Vermilion County, is 
a highly esteemed and widely known citizen of Danville. 
He was born at Sardinia, Ohio, September 8, 1877, the son 
of Thomas and Sarah (Roudebush) Wellman. 

Thomas Wellman, deceased, was a farmer and spent the 
greater part of his life in Brown County. He was a native 
of Farmington, Maine, and his wife was born in Ohio. She 
is also deceased. Clarence Edwin, the subject of this 
sketch, was their only child. 

The boyhood of Clarence Edwin Wellman was spent on 
a farm. He came to Illinois from Ohio when he was six- 
teen years of age and worked on a farm near Rossville for 
several years. He attended Greer College, Hoopeston, and 
also was a student at Eureka College, Eureka, Illinois. He 
left school in March, 1898, and enlisted in Battery A, First 
Illinois Volunteer Light Artillery, and was sent for train- 
ing to Chickamauga Park, Georgia, and then to Porto Rico. 
He returned to the United States and was honorably dis- 
charged on November 25, 1898. After his service in the 
Spanish-American War, Mr. Wellman entered the employ 
of the Sprague Canning Machinery Company at Hoopes- 
ton, Illinois, as a mechanic, and remained in their employ 
until January 1, 1912. At that time he accepted the office 
of deputy clerk in the office of the Circuit Court. He was 



678 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

elected clerk of the Circuit Court in 1916, and is now serv- 
ing the fourth term in that office. 

December 25, 1901, Mr. Wellman married Miss Mary A. 
Lindahl, of East Lynn, Illinois, the daughter of Augustus 
and Emily Lindahl, of Hoopeston, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lindahl were born in Sweden. To Mr. and Mrs. Wellman 
were born three children: Earle F., born April 2, 1906, 
lives at home ; Gladys M., born November 26, 1908, married 
Donald G. Finch, lives at Danville; and Marion E., born 
March 23, 1912, attends Danville High School. 

Politically, Mr. Wellman is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of Saint James Methodist Episcopal Church, and has 
served for fourteen years as general secretary of the Sun- 
day School. He is affiliated with Oliver Branch, No. 38, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Past Monarch Gao Grotto; Mystic 
Order of Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm; Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America; Knights of Pythias; and he is 
past department commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

Mr. Wellman enlisted in Company B, Third Infantry, 
Illinois National Guard, March, 1908, and was made second 
lieutenant in 1911. He was transferred to the 5th Infantry 
Illinois National Guard in 1912 as Battalion Quartermaster 
and Commissary. He resigned from the National Guard 
on November 26, 1916. 



Lewis G. Bishop is a veteran of the World War and a 
leading business man of Danville, where he is president of 
the Bishop Construction Company, with offices in the 
Adams Building. He was born in Crawford County, Illi- 
nois, May 13, 1893, the son of William L. and Emily E. 
(Adams) Bishop. 

William L. Bishop, deceased, was a native of Crawford 
County, Illinois, and his wife was born in Indiana. He 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 679 

was reared on his father's farm and was well educated. 
He became a merchant at Hutsonville, Illinois, and in 1900 
located at Danville, where he was associated with the Dan- 
ville Wholesale Grocery Company until the time of his 
death in 1904. He is buried at Danville. Mr. Bishop was 
a life long Republican, a member of the Christian Church, 
and Hutsonville Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
of which he was Past Master for fifteen years. Emily E. 
(Adams) Bishop is the daughter of Lewis and Hannah S. 
(Shewman) Adams, natives of Ohio and early settlers of 
Crawford County, Illinois. She lives at Danville. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bishop were the parents of five children : Dr. Frank, 
physician and surgeon, died in Los Angeles, California, in 
September, 1928, was a graduate of the University of Ken- 
tucky and the University of Southern California, and a 
World War veteran, having served in France with the 
United States Medical Corps as a captain; Zella, married 
W. E. Reynolds, lives at Jacksonville, Florida; Fern, mar- 
ried H. E. Parker, Jr., lives at Danville; Lewis G., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Blanche, lives at home. 

Lewis G. Bishop was educated in the public schools of 
Crawford County and also attended school in Danville. 
He began his business career with the Danville Brick Com- 
pany as a salesman and in 1916 established the Bishop 
Construction Company, which was incorporated three 
years later. They specialize in road building and have to 
their credit the building of the Paxton and Elliott road, 
several excellent roads in Vermilion County, and the first 
road of brick that was built in Iroquois County, Illinois. 

In September, 1921, Mr. Bishop was united in marriage 
with Miss Joanna Jones, the daughter of 0. M. Jones, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this history. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bishop have two children : William, born July 4, 
1923; and Emmalou, born February 23, 1927. 

Mr. Bishop is a Republican, a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Anchor Lodge, Ancient Free and 



680 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, thirty-second de- 
gree; Ansar Temple, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332; American Legion, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, Danville Country Club, and Kiwanis Club. 

During the World War Mr. Bishop enlisted on Decem- 
ber 3, 1917, in the Ordnance Department. He was sent to 
the Columbus (Ohio) Barracks, later to Fort Dodge, Iowa, 
and Washington, District of Columbia. He served in 
France with the Advanced Ordnance Corps, No. 4, Ammu- 
nition Dump at Neuf Chateau. He was discharged in May, 
1919, as sergeant of ordnance. 



Herman Carl Horneman, who is president of the Sugar 
Creek Creamery Company, 123 North Washington Ave- 
nue, is one of the representative business men of Danville 
and Vermilion County. He was born at Harlan, Kansas, 
May 13, 1884, the son of Charles and Caroline (Leifheit) 
Horneman. 

Charles Horneman was born near Berlin, Germany, 
in 1839, and came to the United States in 1858. He settled 
in DeKalb County, Illinois, where he followed his trade as a 
blacksmith and machinist. He was married at Hinkley, 
Illinois., to Caroline Leifheit, also a native of Germany, 
and they then settled at Harlan, Smith County, Kansas. 
Later, the family located in Nebraska and from there went 
to Des Moines, Iowa. At the time of his death in 1917 
Mr. Horneman was living at Long Beach, California. He 
is buried at Des Moines, Iowa. Mr. Horneman was a Re- 
publican, a member of the German Lutheran Church, and 
held various club and lodge memberships. His widow lives 
at Long Beach, California. To Mr. and Mrs. Horneman 
were born seven children, as follows: Will, lives at Des 
Moines, Iowa ; Charles, deceased ; Frank, lives at Danville ; 
Albert, deceased ; Albertina, married Dr. H. C. Jones, lives 




HERMAN CARL, HORNEMAN 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 681 

at Los Angeles, California; Walter, lives at Louisville, 
Kentucky, where he is manager of the Sugar Creek Cream- 
ery Company; and Herman Carl, the subject of this sketch. 

The boyhood of Herman Carl Horneman was spent at 
Des Moines, Iowa, where he received his early schooling. 
He was graduated in agriculture from Iowa State College 
in 1907 and in 1920 received his Master's degree from the 
same institution. After leaving college in 1907 he was 
identified with the Agricultural Extension Department of 
the State of Iowa for two years. He was then associated 
with the Blue Valley Creamery Company of Chicago, in 
charge of cream purchasing for their entire creamery sys- 
tem. In June, 1910, Mr. Horneman organized the Wat- 
seka Creamery Company at Watseka, Illinois. The busi- 
ness expanded rapidly and was incorporated in 1914 as 
the Sugar Creek Creamery Company. The company's gen- 
eral offices were removed to Danville in 1917 and factories 
in other cities have been established, as follows : Danville 
and Pana, Illinois, in 1913; Louisville, Kentucky, in 1917; 
St. Louis, Missouri, in 1919; Indianapolis and Evansville, 
Ind., in 1921; Marshfield, Missouri, in 1922; and Bristol, 
South Dakota, in 1927. 

Mr. Horneman was the sole owner of the first creamery 
operated by the Sugar Creek Creamery Company at Wat- 
seka, 111., and therefore was made president of the busi- 
ness when it was incorporated. He has continued in that 
capacity to the present time. 

In 1908 Mr. Horneman married Miss Florence Coe, the 
daughter of Seymour and Caroline (Peterson) Coe, natives 
of Ames, Iowa. They have a son, Kenneth, born in 1910. 
He attended Pasadena Junior College one year and in 1929 
he entered Iowa State College at Ames, Iowa. 

Mr. Horneman is identified with the Republican party 
in politics and has been president of the Board of Educa- 
tion, Danville, for the past five years. He has the follow- 
ing lodge affiliations: Furtherlight Lodge, Ancient, Free 



682 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; Watseka Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Mary Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar, Watseka, Illinois; Ansar Tem- 
ple; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332. He 
belongs to the Danville Country Club; Danville Yacht 
Club; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity; and Chamber of 
Commerce. He is president of the Illinois Allied Dairy 
Interests, and is secretary of the Illinois Guernsey Breed- 
ers Association. 



Rufus Martin Utterback. — In the development of a 
career which has been characterized by marked industry 
and energy, and the achievement of merited success, the 
younger generation should take interest, for in this way 
lessons of incalculable value may be learned. Such a career 
has been that of Rufus Martin Utterback, president of 
Utterback's Business College at Danville, who, commenc- 
ing his independent life with little to aid him save faith 
in himself and a good education, with some experience 
as a teacher and a large amount of native ability, has 
steadily advanced in the field of commercial education until 
now he has three branch schools in addition to the parent 
school at Mattoon, Illinois, and he is accounted one of the 
leaders in his field of effort. 

Professor Utterback was born May 21, 1878, at Dundas, 
Richland County, Illinois, and is a son of Martin and Eliza 
(Burgess) Utterback. 

Martin Utterback was born near Elizabethtown, Har- 
din County, Kentucky, his birthplace being near that of 
Abraham Lincoln, and he was three years of age when he 
was brought to Illinois by his parents, the remainder of 
his life being passed in Richland County, Illinois, where 
he helped to haul logs for the first court house of the coun- 
ty. He was of German descent, but the family has been 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 683 

long in this country and his grandfather Snyder was pres- 
ent at the signing of the Declaration of Independence, clad 
in homespun linen uniform as sergeant-at-arms. At Clare- 
mont, Illinois, in 1857, Martin Utterback married Eliza 
Burgess, of Scotch descent, a daughter of James Burgess, 
a veteran of the War of 1812, and one of the early pioneers 
of Ohio. 

Rufus Martin Utterback acquired his early education 
at Dundas, Illinois, where he attended the rural schools, 
and he followed this by a course at Valparaiso University. 
Later, he took a course at the Southwestern Business Col- 
lege. He commenced his career as a teacher in the public 
schools and was engaged from 1896 until 1904. He then 
spent one and one-half years as a stenographer and in 1905 
turned his attention to business college work, with which 
he has been identified to the present, although it was not 
until 1909 that he purchased and started operation of what 
has since been known as Utterback's Business College, of 
which he has been president since its incorporation. In 
1919 Mr. Utterback organized the branch school at Paris, 
Illinois, and in 1921 the second branch school was located 
at Olney, Illinois. In 1925 the third branch school was 
established at Danville. These have all proven decidedly 
successful under his careful and capable management, and 
there are already found a number of successful men and 
women in the business world who received their training 
at the Utterback schools. Mr. Utterback has given his 
chief attention to the management and direction of these 
establishments, but has not overlooked the duties of citi- 
zenship, and from 1915 until 1917 served as a member of 
the city council of Mattoon. 

Mr. Utterback was married at Calhoun, Illinois, July 19, 
1905, to Miss Leona A. Bartley, a daughter of Edward T. 
and Elvira Jane Bartley. Edward T. Bartley, who died 
in May, 1925, was a grandson of Governor Mordecai Bart- 
ley, of Ohio, a Union soldier during the Civil War, and a 



684 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

relative of William Hooper, one of the signers of the Decla- 
ration of Independence. William Hooper was born at Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, June 17, 1742, and was graduated from 
Harvard College in 1760, following which he practiced law 
in North Carolina and early became interested in the 
Colonial struggle with Great Britain. He was elected to 
the Continental Congress in 1774, and became a signer of 
the famous document of July 4, 1776. He died in Hillsboro, 
North Carolina, in October, 1790. Mrs. Bartley, who still 
survives her husband, is a descendant of the old Scotch 
Covenanteers. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Utterback there have been born two 
children: Ethel Elvira, born December 27, 1913, died at 
birth; and Mary Elizabeth, born March 3, 1917. 

Mr. Utterback is a Republican, a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, Mattoon Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, thirty-second de- 
gree; Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Modern Wood- 
men of America, and Rotary Club. He is also identified 
with the United Association of Accredited Private Busi- 
ness Schools. 



Albert A. Berhalter is one of the dependable and well 
known business men of Danville, where he is identified 
with the Berhalter Funeral Parlors, 106-08 West Main 
Street. He was born at Kendallville, Indiana, July 4, 1867, 
the son of Joseph and Frances (Schunder) Berhalter. 

Both Joseph Berhalter and his wife were natives of 
Germany. Their marriage took place at Reading, Penn- 
sylvania, after their arrival in this country about 1850. 
He was a cabinet maker by trade and was also employed 
in the car shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Reading. 
Later, he lived at Corona, Indiana, and while a resident of 
that place became successful as a manufacturer of furni- 
ture and coffins. During the Civil War he enlisted in the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 685 

Indiana Volunteer Infantry and served throughout the 
war period. After the close of the war Mr. Berhalter re- 
moved with his family to Kendallville, Indiana, where he 
continued in the manufacturing business until his death, 
September 4, 1881. His wife died in January, 1884. They 
are buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Kendallville. There 
were nine children in the Berhalter family, as follows: 
John, Joseph, Frank, and Louisa, all deceased; George, who 
died in March, 1928; Etta, deceased, was the wife of Casper 
Vetter; Charles, who died in 1926; Minnie, deceased; and 
Albert A., the subject of this sketch. 

The boyhood of Albert A. Berhalter was spent at Ken- 
dallville, Indiana, and following his graduation from high 
school in 1886 he became associated with the manufactur- 
ing business there, which had been established by his 
father. About 1888 he came to Danville and went with 
N. A. Kimball, mortician, with whom he was identified 
until 1893. He then purchased Mr. Kimball's interests in 
partnership with W. C. Olmsted, the firm being known as 
Berhalter & Olmsted. Mr. Berhalter became sole owner 
of the business in 1919. 

In 1892 Mr. Berhalter was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Hurley, the daughter of Cornelius and Mary Ann 
(Shean) Hurley, the former a native of New York and the 
latter of Canada. Mr. Hurley is deceased and buried at 
LaSalle, Illinois. His wife is buried at Danville. Their 
children were: Anna, lives at Danville; Ella, married M. 
J. Denny, lives at McAllen, Texas; and Mary Berhalter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Berhalter have three daughters: Madeline, 
married Dr. M. J. Monahan, lives at Danville, and they 
have a daughter, Jane; Mary, lives at home; and Lillian, 
deceased. 

Mr. Berhalter is a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
Knights of Pythias, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332, Rotary Club, and Danville Yacht Club. He 



686 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

is also a member of the National Selected Morticians, Illi- 
nois Funeral Directors Association, and National Funeral 
Directors Association. 



Benjamin Charles English. — One of the outstanding 
financiers of Danville is Benjamin Charles English, who 
is assistant cashier of the First National Bank. He is also 
a veteran of the World War. Mr. English was born at 
Danville, February 5, 1885, the son of Charles Lewis and 
Mary Alice (O'Hara) English. 

Charles Lewis English, deceased, was president of the 
First National Bank of Danville. A complete sketch of 
him appears elsewhere in this history. 

Benjamin Charles English received his early education 
in the public schools of Danville and was graduated from 
the University of Chicago in 1907. He has been interested 
in banking throughout his business career and besides 
holding the office of assistant cashier of the First National 
Bank he is vice president of the Taylor English Coal Com- 
pany, and treasurer of the Vermilion County Building As- 
sociation, Danville. 

Mr. English enlisted in 1908 in Company I, Fifth In- 
fantry, Illinois National Guard, and was later promoted to 
first lieutenant, serving until 1914. During the World War 
he was commissioned a captain in the Infantry and served 
as assistant instructor at the First Officers Training Camp 
at Chicago, Illinois. He then went to Camp Grant, Rock- 
ford, Illinois, where he was attached to the Three Hundred 
Forty-third Infantry, Eighty-sixth Division. He sailed for 
France in May, 1918, and was in the Argonne offensive. 
After the armistice he was assigned to General Headquar- 
ters of Quartermaster, Army of Occupation, serving until 
July, 1919, when he returned to the United States. He was 
discharged as a Major, and now holds that rank in the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 687 

United States Reserve Corps. He is a member of the 
American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

On November 10, 1909, Mr. English married Miss Pearl 
Benjamin, of Danville, the daughter of Frank A. and 
Louise (Vierson) Benjamin. The former lives at Danville. 
Mrs. Benjamin is deceased. 

Mr. English is a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Rock- 
ford Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Danville 
Consistory, thirty-second degree, and Loyal Order of 
Moose. 



Charles Lewis English, deceased, was one of Danville's 
foremost citizens and prominently identified with its finan- 
cial interests for more than half a century. He stood high 
in banking and business circles in the city and was highly 
esteemed by all who knew him. Mr. English was born at 
Perrysville, Indiana, July 15, 1846, the son of Joseph G. and 
Maria (Hicks) English. 

Joseph G. English was a native of Rising Sun, Ohio. 
He came to Danville in 1854 and became a leading business 
man and banker of this section, being president of the First 
National Bank of Danville for many years. He retired 
from business in 1899. Both he and his wife are deceased. 

Charles Lewis English attended the public schools of 
Danville and was a graduate of DePauw University. Early 
in his business career he was interested in the lumber busi- 
ness. In April, 1864, he enlisted in Company K, One Hun- 
dred Thirty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was hon- 
orably discharged in October, 1864. He then went into 
the lumber business for twelve years, being associated with 
Col. L. T. Dickason, of Chicago. In 1867 Mr. English be- 
came interested in the banking business. He became cash- 
ier of the First National Bank of Danville, in 1882, later 
served as vice president, and in 1899 was elected president. 



688 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

He held this office until his death, February 22, 1918. He 
was also identified with the Westville Coal Company and 
the Reola Coal Company. 

In 1883 Mr. English married Miss Mary Alice O'Hara, 
of Richmond, Indiana. Their children were: Benjamin 
Charles, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this his- 
tory; and Daniel Joseph, deceased. 

Mr. English was always a Republican. He was identi- 
fied with the Masonic Lodge, Elks, and held membership 
in the Methodist Church. 



Albert Marion Earel, M. D. — A brilliant record of 
achievement and attainment is contained in the life story 
of Doctor Albert Marion Earel, one of the most prominent 
physicians and surgeons of Vermilion County, who is en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession at Hoopeston. He 
was born on a farm near Abingdon, Illinois, June 22, 1866, 
the son of Hervey Dale and Abigail (Linn) Earel. 

Hervey Dale Earel was born on a farm near Parkers- 
burg, Virginia. At the age of four years he came with his 
parents to Ohio, but later located near Quincy, Illinois, 
when he was eight years old. Here his father, James 
Earel, deposited in a bank all his savings, about $8,000 in 
gold, and proceeded to hunt for a farm that he could pur- 
chase with this money and make for himself and family a 
comfortable home. Before the purchase could be consum- 
mated the bank failed, closed its doors and left him very 
little money. He then bought and cleared a farm near Co- 
lumbus, Illinois, but soon after died of typhoid fever, leav- 
ing his family with little besides the farm. Hervey Dale 
Earel, the second son, became the head of the family when 
only ten years of age. He was married first to Margaret 
Sammons, and to this union were born two sons and three 
daughters. He was married the second time to Miss Abi- 







& 0u t 2'u^^^r^ 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 689 

gail Linn, who was born near Cedar Grove, Franklin 
County, Indiana. To this union were born three sons, as 
follows: Charles Franklin, died in childhood; Albert Ma- 
rion, the subject of this sketch; and Major John William, 
M. D., lives at Long Beach, California. By his first mar- 
riage Hervey Dale Earel had five children: Mary Eliza- 
beth and Erasmus James, both deceased; Silas R., lives at 
Galesburg, Illinois; Mary Frances, died in childhood; and 
Mrs. Florence Jane Nelson, lives at Abingdon, Illinois. 

Hervey Dale Earel helped organize a company of men 
for service during the Civil War for the Union Army, but 
upon medical examination he was refused and sent back 
home. He later enlisted again, however, but was refused 
the second time on account of physical disability. Soon 
after the close of the Civil War he took his family to Ab- 
ingdon, Illinois, and for a number of years owned and op- 
erated a hotel and livery stable at that place, and was one 
of three men to organize the first bank in Abingdon, Illi- 
nois. He afterward moved to a farm near Abingdon, 
where he engaged in stock raising and farming. In 1886 
he returned to Abingdon, where he lived until his death, 
February 4, 1898. His wife died September 30, 1917, at 
the age of eighty-six years and is buried at Abingdon. Po- 
litically, Mr. Earel was a Republican. He was a devout 
Christian, being a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in which he was for many years a steward or a 
trustee. He was also for many years a member of the 
board of trustees of Hedding College, at Abingdon. He 
served as an alderman for the city of Abingdon. As a boy 
he had little opportunity to go to school, yet by constant 
reading and study he became a well educated man. He 
was a citizen of excellent character, deeply religious, 
chivalrous as a Virginian is, and taught his sons that their 
promise should be as inviolate as their bond. 

Albert Marion Earel attended the district schools and 
Knox College, Galesburg, 111. Later, he studied medicine 

10— Vol. 2 



690 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

under the preceptorship of Dr. Madison Reece, of Abing- 
don, and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine at Rush 
Medical College in 1891. He has since practiced his pro- 
fession at Hoopeston, with the exception of post graduate 
work in this country and in Europe. He has studied at 
the Chicago Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat College; Philadel- 
phia Polyclinic ; Will's Eye Hospital, Philadelphia ; Central 
Eye & Ear Infirmary of New York City; Polyclinic of New 
York City; Golden Square Nose & Throat Hospital, of Lon- 
don, England; Royal Ophthalmic Hospital, of London, 
England; Guy's Hospital, London, England; and Vienna, 
Austria. He is numbered among the most skillful special- 
ists in Illinois and has an extensive practice. 

On December 29, 1892, Doctor Earel was united in 
marriage with Miss Sadie E. Honeywell, of Hoopeston, 
111., the daughter of Alba and Cornelia Rosetta (Andrews) 
Honeywell, natives of New York. Mr. Honeywell, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this history, died at his 
home, 509 Honeywell Avenue, Hoopeston, on February 4, 
1916. His wife died April 10, 1904. Both are buried in 
Floral Hill Cemetery, Hoopeston. Doctor and Mrs. Earel 
have one daughter, Eleanor Claire Earel, who lives at 
home. Mrs. Earel was graduated from Hoopeston High 
School and also graduated from Hedding College with the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts and 
later receiving her master's degree. 

Doctor Earel is a Republican and has been a member 
of the school board of Hoopeston for 15 years and a mem- 
ber of the city council for eight years. Both he and his 
wife are active members of the Universalist Church, of 
which he has been moderator of the parish for five years. 
He holds membership in the Masonic Lodge, thirty-second 
degree, Shrine, Loyal Order of Moose, Modern Woodmen 
of America, Lions Club, and Commercial Club. Doctor 
Earel is a member of the Vermilion County Medical So- 
ciety, Illinois State Medical Society, American Medical 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 691 

Association, and is a Fellow in the American Academy of 
Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology. 

Doctor Earel was one of the members of the Medical 
Board that examined Company B before they left for pa- 
trol duty on the Mexican border ; and was one of the med- 
ical board during the World War, and examined the eyes, 
ears, noses and throats of all the men examined at 
Hoopeston. 

A fine citizen, a total abstainer, always standing firmly 
for what he considers right, a good dependable man in a 
community and a beloved physician to his patients, Doctor 
Earel is outstanding in the community. He and his wife 
have travelled throughout the world and have many inter- 
esting souveniers of their numerous voyages. Among these 
may be mentioned the motion pictures taken by Doctor 
Earel during his visits to foreign lands. They have espe- 
cial appeal and illustrate his familiarity with the most in- 
teresting spots in both Europe and America. 

The great grandfather of Doctor Earel was James 
Earel, Sr., of Maryland, who was a Revolutionary soldier. 
His maternal great grandfather, Robert Given, also served 
as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His grandfather, 
James Earel, Jr., was a soldier in the War of 1812 and 
participated in the Nanvoo (Mormon) War. 



Benjamin Franklin Davidson is an enterprising and 
successful business man of Danville, where he is president 
of the Interstate Printing Company, 132 North Walnut 
Street. He was born in this city, March 29, 1887, the son 
of Henry Morton and Sarah (DeArmond) Davidson. 

Henry Morton Davidson, well known in Danville, is a 
native of Logansport, Indiana, born in 1864. He began his 
career with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad as a 
bridge carpenter and in 1882 came to Danville in that com- 



692 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

pany's employ. Later, he established a livery business with 
Will DeArmond under the firm name of Davidson & De- 
Armond. For a number of years Mr. Davidson conducted 
a retail coal business at 300 South Street. In 1920 he be- 
came interested in the grocery business at Fairchild and 
Jackson streets. He still conducts this place of business. 
Mr. Davidson is a Democrat and has served as alderman of 
the first ward. He is a member of Saint James Methodist 
Episcopal Church and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Mr. and Mrs. Davidson have three children: Benjamin 
Franklin, the subject of this sketch; Bessie, twin sister of 
Benjamin F., married Frank G. Swafford, lives at Ham- 
mond, Indiana; and Arthur L., lives at Danville, where he 
is associated in business with his father. 

Henry Morton Davidson is the son of John Davidson, 
a native of Crawford County, Pennsylvania, and one of 
the earliest settlers of Logansport, Indiana. He operated 
a saw mill for many years near Logansport. The latter 
part of his life was spent at Danville, where he died. 

Benjamin Franklin Davidson attended the public 
schools of Danville and worked as a boy on the Commercial 
News. He subsequently entered the University of Illinois, 
and after leaving college went to Spokane, Washington, 
where he followed his trade as a printer. In 1919 he came 
to Danville and at that time purchased the Interstate Print- 
ing Company, of which he became president. It is among 
the up-to-date printing plants of the city and carries on a 
large volume of business, specializing in commercial 
printing. 

In 1927 Mr. Davidson married Rose L. Woods, the 
daughter of Arthur Woods, of Los Angeles, California. By 
a former marriage Mr. Davidson has three children: Carl, 
associated with him in business; Helen and Jane, both 
students. 

Politically, Mr. Davidson is a Republican. He holds 
membership in Saint James Methodist Episcopal Church; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 693 

Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
No. 38; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Mo- 
hammed Shrine, Peoria, Illinois; Knights of Pythias; Dan- 
ville Yacht Club; and Chamber of Commerce. 



Perl Humrichouse, proprietor of the Humrichouse Tire 
Shop, which is located at North and Hazel streets, is well 
and favorably known in Danville. He was born at Saint 
Joseph, Illinois, September 5, 1870, the son of James W. and 
Priscilla (Grace) Humrichouse. 

James W. Humrichouse was born at Cayuga, Vermilion 
County, Indiana, in 1845, and his wife is a native of Cam- 
eron, Warren County, Illinois. He spent his boyhood on 
his father's farm and during the Civil War served with 
the Union Army, having enlisted in an Illinois outfit. After 
the close of the war he purchased a farm near Saint Joseph, 
Illinois, where he lived until his retirement. He also owned 
farms in Benton County, Illinois, and was widely known as 
a breeder of pure bred horses and cattle. He died in 1927 
and is buried in Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Indiana. 
Mr. Humrichouse was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church and Grand Army of the Republic. His widow 
lives at Frankfort, Indiana. Four children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Humrichouse : George, who died in 1922, was 
president of the Danville Wholesale Grocery Company; 
Perl, the subject of this sketch; Estella, married Lan Mc- 
Clurg, lives at Frankfort, Indiana; and Dolly, who died 
in 1909. 

Perl Humrichouse obtained his education in the public 
and high schools of Homer, Illinois. He remained on his 
father's farm until 1894, at which time he came to Dan- 
ville. In partnership with his brother, George, he pur- 
chased a grocery store on East Main Street. Later, he was 
connected with the Danville Wholesale Grocery Company 



694 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

as a traveling representative until 1916. He then pur- 
chased a farm in Vermilion County, which he operated 
until 1922, at that date selling the farm of two hundred 
seventy-six acres. He subsequently purchased a tire store 
across the street from the present location on North Street. 
Mr. Humrichouse has been agent at Danville for the Fire- 
stone Tire Company for several years, and deals in other 
automobile accessories, including tubes and supplies. He 
specializes in battery service and does first class work in 
automobile washing and greasing. 

In 1911 Mr. Humrichouse married Miss Ethel Adams, 
the daughter of William B. and Fanny Adams, of Cutler, 
Indiana. He died in December, 1927. His widow lives at 
Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mr. and Mrs. Humrichouse 
have two children: William Robert, born April 15, 1916; 
and Dorothy Ann, born February 4, 1923. 

Mr. Humrichouse is a Republican, a member of the 
Rotary Club, Chamber of Commerce, and has the following 
club affiliations: Anchor Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; 
Ansar Temple; and Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. 



Ralph E. Lauten, who is secretary and treasurer of the 
Danville Lumber Company, is a veteran of the World War 
and one of the progressive young business men of Dan- 
ville. He was born at Caldwell, Illinois, January 29, 1899, 
the son of Fred and Emma (Bruns) Lauten. 

Fred Lauten is a native of Germany. He was born and 
reared at Leipzig and early in life came to the United 
States with his parents, Fred and Caroline Lauten. He 
lived on a farm for a number of years and in December, 
1905, removed to Princeton, Indiana. His wife is a native 
of Effingham County, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Lauten 
the following children were born: Harry, a World War 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 695 

veteran, the agent for the Standard Oil Company, lives 
at Princeton, Indiana; Ray, lives at Mobile, Alabama, 
where is a chief clerk to the vice president and general 
manager of the Gulf, Mobile & Northern Railroad, is a 
World War veteran, having served as a second lieutenant; 
Ralph E., the subject of this sketch; and Carl, who lives 
at Princeton, Indiana. Mr. Fred Lauten is a member of 
the German Lutheran Church and Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. 

Ralph E. Lauten obtained his schooling at Princeton, 
Indiana, and following his graduation from high school in 
1916 he attended Lockyear's Business College at Evans- 
ville, Indiana. He enlisted in Company M, Second Indiana 
Infantry, National Guard, which was later mustered into 
the federal service as Company M, One Hundred Fifty- 
second Infantry, Thirty-eighth Division. He trained at 
Camp Shelby, Mississippi, and spent almost a year in active 
service in France. Following the Armistice he attended 
the American Expeditionary Force University, located at 
Beaune, France. He was discharged July 9, 1919, at Camp 
Sherman, Ohio, as battalion supply sergeant. Upon his 
release from the service, Mr. Lauten became associated 
with Morris & Company, packers, and was connected with 
their Danville offices for six months. Since January, 1920, 
he has been connected with the Danville Lumber Company. 
He began as bookkeeper and in January, 1923, was made 
secretary of the company. Two years later he assumed 
his present duties as general manager as well as secretary 
and treasurer. Mr. Lauten is also identified with the Fear- 
heiley-Lauten Service Stations, owners and operators of 
several gasoline service stations in Danville. 

On October 9, 1923, Mr. Lauten was united in marriage 
with Miss Florence Phillips, the daughter of J. Bert and 
May (Zorns) Phillips, of Vermilion County, now residents 
of Danville. Mr. Phillips is secretary and treasurer of the 



696 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Campbell Brothers Packing Company. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lauten have a daughter, Polly Ann, born July 23, 1926. 

In politics Mr. Lauten is an independent voter. He is 
a member of St. James Methodist Episcopal Church; Olive 
Branch Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second Degree; Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; American Legion; 
American Business Club; Chamber of Commerce; and 
Young Men's Christian Association. 



Col. Ernest Fecker, Jr., deceased, was owner and presi- 
dent of the Fecker Company. He was born on August 2, 
1862, in New York City, his parents being Ernest and 
Pauline (Huber) Fecker, both natives of Germany. His 
mother died on the 24th of September, 1906, and his father 
August 17th, 1912. In their family were three children 
the brother of our subject being Frank Fecker, who is now 
deceased, and a sister Mrs. Hans Demuth, who makes her 
home in Hollywood, California. 

Reared in Brooklyn, New York, Ernest Fecker, Jr., 
attended the grammar schools of that city until fourteen 
years of age and after starting to work continued his stu- 
dies in an evening high school of New York for a time. He 
was first employed in a paper box manufactory owned by 
his father and for about five years devoted his time and 
attention to that business, but later became interested in 
the brewing business. He served his apprenticeship in 
the brewery of Peter Engle of Schenectady, New York, 
and later attended a brewing academy from 1885 to 1886. 
It was in 1890 that he embarked in the brewing business 
on his own account, conducting operations for six years 
under the name of Fecker Brewing Company, their plant 
being located on the Dudley and Bloomingdale road, now 
called Winchester Avenue. At the end of that period he 




COL ERNEST PECKER, JR. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 697 

sold his interest in the business to a syndicate and took 
the management of the United States Brewing Company, 
being in charge of breweries Nos. 3, 4 and 5 for some time, 
but in 1903 he purchased the present plant which he con- 
ducted under the firm style of Fecker Brewing Company 
and served as president until his death, November 2nd, 
1925. He died at Excelsior Springs, Missouri, and is 
buried in Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois. 

On the 27th of July, 1889, in Chicago, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Fecker and Miss Clara Simon, a 
daughter of Nicholas and Barbara Simon, residents of 
Chicago, both of whom are now deceased. The children 
born of this union are: Clara, Frances, who is now Mrs. 
A. R. Levis of Alton, Illinois, Pauline, Martha and Ernest 
III now deceased, Frank, mention of whom is made else- 
where in this volume, Lydia, Herbert and Harold, twins. 

Mr. Fecker was an Episcopalian in his religious belief. 
He was a member of the Germania Masonic Lodge of Chi- 
cago and the Further Lights of Danville. He was also a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and a member of the Turn Verein of Danville. His political 
support was always given to the men and measures of the 
republican party and during his residence in Chicago he 
was a member of the Bridewell board from 1891 to 1897 
inclusive. He took a very active and prominent part in 
political affairs and was chosen a member of Governor 
Tanner's Staff on which he served from 1896 to 1900. His 
genial, pleasant manner made him many friends and he 
was popular both in business and social circles. 



Frank J. Fecker, a well known citizen of Danville, is 
president of the Fecker Company, malt and food products, 
329-341 East North Street. He was born in Chicago, July 
6, 1901, the son of Col. Ernest Fecker, Jr., now deceased, 
and Clara (Simon) Fecker. 



698 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mr. Fecker was two years old when his family located 
in Danville. He attended the public schools, and was a 
student at Western Military Academy, Alton, Illinois for 
three years. He graduated from Danville High School and 
Brown's Business College. For a few years he was asso- 
ciated with Smiths' the Florist. In 1923 he became identi- 
fied with the interests of the Fecker Company as a book- 
keeper. After the death of his father in 1925, Mr. Fecker 
was elected president of the Company. 

Mr. Fecker is a Republican, and is a member of the 
Holy Trinity Church. He has the following lodge affilia- 
tions: Olive Branch Lodge; Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Scottish Rite; Athelstan Commandery, Danville; 
Gao Grotto; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 
332; Loyal Order of Moose and A. B. C. Club. 



Hon. Thurman F. Shouse, former mayor of Danville, 
has been identified with that city for many years. He is 
a Methodist minister but since leaving the pastorate on 
account of ill health has had a successful experience in 
several lines of commercial work. Mr. Shouse was born 
at Effingham, Illinois, November 9, 1869. 

The Shouse family has lived in the United States for 
a number of generations, coming originally from Ger- 
many, and first settling in Pennsylvania. His father, 
Thurman F. Shouse, Sr., was born near Logansport, Indi- 
ana, in 1823. He was reared there and shortly after his 
marriage moved to Effingham County, Illinois, where he 
became well known as a substantial farmer. He died at 
Effingham in 1885. He also taught school in early life, 
teaching some of the subscription schools in the pioneer 
days. He served as a school director and in politics was 
an independent Democrat. He also held membership in 
the Baptist Church. His wife, Mary Jane (Thomison) 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 699 

Shouse, was born in Tennessee, in 1826, and died in Effing- 
ham County, Illinois, in 1898. They were the parents of 
the following children: Eliza Jane, married Thomas 
Garner, both deceased; Margaret A., married Eli R. Ren- 
frow, of Shumway, Illinois; John H., died at Eldorado 
Springs, Missouri; Columbus S., died in March, 1926; Rev. 
Joseph D., retired minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, lives at Newton, Illinois; Samantha A., married 
Estes Garner, lives at Centralia, Illinois; Rhoda A., mar- 
ried John A. Riley, lives near Effingham, Illinois; Docia 
E., married William Engle, lives near Effingham, Illinois; 
Thurman F., the subject of this sketch; and Viola, 
deceased. 

Thurman F. Shouse was reared on his father's farm in 
Effingham County, attending the public schools, and grad- 
uating from the high school at Altamount in 1892. For 
two years he continued his education at Austin College, 
and after having qualified for the Methodist ministry, he 
joined the Southern Illinois Conference. As a pastor in 
that conference he was stationed for two years at John- 
sonville, in Wayne County, Illinois; at Moccasin, Illinois, 
for two years; at Coffeen, Illinois, for three years; at 
Tower Hill, Illinois, from 1901 until 1904; and in 1904 he 
came to Danville as pastor of the Lincoln Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, holding that post of responsibility until 1909. 
He then joined an Oklahoma conference and for two years 
was pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Newkirk, Oklahoma. Being threatened with a nervous 
breakdown, Mr. Shouse resigned from the ministry and 
returned to Danville, where he became associated with the 
Eckert Carriage Company, of Auburn, Indiana, as a trav- 
eling representative. In 1912 he became superintendent 
and financial secretary of the Springhill Cemetery Asso- 
ciation, Danville, and in this position he has served until 
the present time and also served the following churches 
as pastor: Central Park Methodist Church for three 



700 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

years, Grace Methodist Church five years, and Vermilion 
Heights Methodist Church one year. 

In April, 1923, Mr. Shouse was elected mayor of Dan- 
ville, beginning his official term on the first day of May. 
He was elected on a platform pledging himself to a clean, 
moral city, and economical administration, and he lived 
up to his platform in a way that brought him high per- 
sonal credit. Danville, when he became mayor, was encum- 
bered with a heavy debt, the deficit amounting to approxi- 
mately $183,000. During his term in office he reduced the 
debt over $50,000. In the meantime the essential munici- 
pal improvements were not neglected. A total of about 
ten miles, comprising one-fifth of the entire paving of the 
city, was either constructed new or resurfaced. 

Mr. Shouse is a Republican. He is affiliated with Olive 
Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, No. 38; 
Lodge of Perfection, fourteenth degree, Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite, and in November, 1927, became a Consistory 
member, now being a thirty-second degree Mason. Dur- 
ing the World War he acted as captain of a district in 
Danville in the promotion of various war drives. 

On February 23, 1888, Mr. Shouse married Miss Effie 
R. DeVore, the daughter of Daniel A. and Margaret 
(Miller) DeVore, both deceased. Mr. DeVore was a well 
known cattle dealer of Effingham County, Illinois. Two 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Shouse: Harry E., 
deceased; and Edna Ruth, married Frank M. Fagan, who 
is general foreman of Springhill Cemetery Association, 
Danville. Mr. Fagan served in the World War, having 
enlisted in the Navy in the spring of 1918. He was sta- 
tioned at Great Lakes Naval Station as a machinist. He 
was discharged from the service in March, 1919. 

Mr. Shouse has three grandchildren, Harry and Dale 
Fagan, and Ruth Elnore Shouse. An adopted son, Gerald 
E. Shouse, was connected with the United States Air 
Forces at Self ridge Field, Mt. Clemens, Michigan; and 
now resides in Danville. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 701 

Claude P. Madden. — Among the prominent men of Dan- 
ville may be mentioned Claude P. Madden, widely known 
throughout Vermilion County as an auctioneer for the 
past twenty years. He was born in Parke County, Indiana, 
June 24, 1880, the son of Anson G. and Marilda (Pithoud) 
Madden. 

Anson G. Madden was born at Kingman, Indiana, in 
1859, the son of Samuel C. and Lydia A. (Marks) Madden. 
He was born in Parke County, Indiana, and his wife was 
born near Lafayette, Indiana. His father was George 
Madden, a native of Clinton County, Ohio, who settled in 
Parke County, Indiana, in 1816. Anson G. Madden, father 
of the subject of this sketch, was educated at Kingman, 
Indiana. He was a farmer in early life and for twenty- 
live years was well known as a stock shipper. He has been 
an auctioneer in Indiana for over forty years and lives at 
Cates, Indiana. He served as circuit court clerk of Foun- 
tain County, Indiana. Mr. Madden is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and is affiliated with King- 
man Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Royal 
Arch Chapter, Consistory, thirty-second degree, and 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Marilda 
(Pithoud) Madden, who died at Kingman, Indiana, in 
1883, was the daughter of Elisha and Margaret (Ratcliff) 
Pithoud, both natives of Fountain County, Indiana. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Madden an only child was born, Claude P., 
the subject of this sketch. 

Claude P. Madden grew up at Kingman, Indiana, where 
he was educated. He also attended Bloomingdale Acad- 
emy for two years. He remained on his father's farm 
until he was twenty-five years of age and in 1905 engaged 
in auctioneering in Fountain County, Indiana. Four years 
later he came to Danville, where he has met with marked 
success in his chosen work. He is also well known as a 
dealer in horses and cattle. His auctioneering activities 
extend throughout Illinois and Indiana. 



702 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On February 4, 1928, Mr. Madden was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary Catherine Pemberton, daughter of 
W. S. and Lucy (Guthrie) Pemberton, the former a native 
of Kentucky and the latter of Illinois. Mr. Pemberton 
resides in Vermilion County, where he is a successful 
dairyman. His wife is deceased. 

Mr. Madden is a Democrat in politics. He was elected 
mayor of Danville in 1919, re-elected in 1921, and again 
elected to office in 1925. He is a member of Anchor Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, No. 980, and Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332. 



H. Wayne Baker. — One of the representative young 
business men of Danville is H. Wayne Baker, who is vice- 
president, secretary, treasurer, and general manager of 
the Baker Motor Company, Inc., agents in Danville for 
the Willys-Knight and Whippet automobiles. He was born 
near LeRoy, McLean County, Illinois, April 26, 1903, the 
son of Benjamin F. and Celia (Williams) Baker. 

Benjamin F. Baker, who is president of the Baker Motor 
Company, Inc., is a highly esteemed and well known resi- 
dent of LeRoy, Illinois, where he lives retired. He was 
born at McLean, Illinois, October 11, 1871, the son of 
Joseph Baker, a leading agriculturist of McLean County 
for many years. Benjamin F. Baker grew up in Illinois 
and was educated in the public schools. He attended Illi- 
nois Normal College and spent three years as a student at 
the Kentucky Medical College. He became interested in 
the grain business at Glen Avon, Illinois, and owned and 
operated three elevators there for ten years. In 1906 he 
purchased the LeRoy Telephone Companjr, which he later 
merged with the telephone companies at McLean, Bell- 
flower, Heyworth, Atlanta, Saybrook, Armington, and 
Downs, Illinois. The new organization was known as the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 703 

Cornbelt Telephone Company and Mr. Baker remained 
as owner and president of this company until his retire- 
ment in 1926. He has extensive land holdings throughout 
Illinois and ranks as a leader in the civic life of the com- 
munity in which he lives. Mr. Baker is a Republican, a 
member of the Christian Church and belongs to LeRoy 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Baker one child was born, H. Wayne, the subject of 
this sketch. 

The education of H. Wayne Baker was received in the 
public schools of LeRoy, Culver Military Academy, and 
Canton High School. His college work was taken at Illi- 
nois Wesleyan College, University of Wisconsin, Wabash 
College, and Vanderbilt University. He began his busi- 
ness career in Miami, Florida, where he engaged in the 
real estate business. Upon his return to LeRoy, Illinois, 
in June, 1926, Mr. Baker was associated with his father's 
business interests. In July, 1928, he came to Danville, 
where he purchased the Taylor Motor Company, in part- 
nership with his father, the business thereafter being- 
known as the Baker Motor Company, Inc. They are local 
dealers for the Willys-Knight and Whippet cars and have 
the finest display rooms in Danville. About fifteen men 
are employed by the Baker Motor Company, Inc. 

In October, 1925, Mr. Baker married Miss Cornelia 
Murray, the daughter of Edwin and Cornelia Murray, of 
Nashville, Tennessee. Mr. Murray is president of the 
Murray-Durell Shoe Company, of Nashville. Two chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Baker: Betty, born 
in 1927; and Benjamin, born in 1929. 

Mr. Baker is a Republican, a member of the Christian 
Church, Sigma Chi fraternity, American Business Club, 
and Chamber of Commerce. He is affiliated with LeRoy 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. Baker is identified with the Danville Automobile 
Dealers Association, the Illinois Automobile Dealers Asso- 



704 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ciation, and the National Automobile Dealers Association. 
He is also a member of the Danville Flying Club. 



Hon. S. Murray Clark, judge of the Circuit Court of 
Vermilion County, is prominent among the members of 
his profession in Danville, and is a highly esteemed mem- 
ber of the community. He was born at Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, May 15, 1869, the son of Dr. John G. and Mary 
(Holaday) Clark. 

Dr. John G. Clark was born in North Carolina, May 2, 
1836. He studied dentistry and for several years engaged 
in practice at Covington, Indiana, later removing to a farm 
near Crawfordsville. He retired from his profession, due 
to ill health, and in 1870 settled on a farm in Elwood Town- 
ship, Vermilion County, where he lived until 1890. He 
spent the following five years in Vermilion Grove and then 
lived at Georgetown, Illinois, where he was president of the 
First National Bank. Both Doctor and Mrs. Clark are 
deceased. He was a member of the Society of Friends 
Church and was one of the founders of the Friends Acad- 
emy at Vermilion Grove, Illinois. There were three chil- 
dren in the Clark family : Oliver P. ; S. Murray, the subject 
of this sketch ; and Emma, married Prof. C. E. Cosand. 

S. Murray Clark was educated in the public schools 
and also attended Vermilion Academy until 1887. He was 
a student at Earlham College, Richmond, Ind., for two 
years and in 1893 was graduated from the law department 
of Illinois Wesleyan University. He was admitted to the 
Illinois bar in that year and took up his private practice at 
Ridge Farm Illinois. The following year he came to Dan- 
ville and became associated in practice with George G. 
Mabin under the firm name of Mabin & Clark. This part- 
nership continued until 1902, at which time Mr. Clark was 
appointed county judge of Vermilion County to succeed 




S. MURRAY CLARK 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 705 

Judge Thompson, who was elected at that time to the cir- 
cuit court. He served three months and then was elected 
county judge, holding that office until 1906, when he re- 
signed to become assistant district attorney of eastern Illi- 
nois. Mr. Clark later former a partnership with H. E. 
Hutton under the firm of Clark & Hutton. In June, 1927, 
he was elected judge of the Circuit Court, in which ca- 
pacity he is still serving. 

On August 6, 1895, Mr. Clark married Miss Myra Men- 
denhall, who was born at Catlin, Illinois, January 6, 1871, 
the daughter of Dr. M. C. and Cynthia (Kennedy) Men- 
denhall, the former a native of North Carolina and the lat- 
ter of Indiana. Both Doctor and Mrs. Mendenhall are de- 
ceased. He was a leading physician for many years at 
Catlin, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have no children. 

Politically, Judge Clark is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 
332; Loyal Order of Moose, No. 1001; Knights of Pythias; 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; and Modern Woodmen 
of America. He is identified with the Vermilion County 
Bar Association and Illinois Bar Association. 



Joseph Fairhall, Jr., is numbered among the most suc- 
cessful business men of Danville, where he is connected 
with Fairhall's Electric Repair and Machine Shop, 6 South 
Gilbert Street. He was born in London, England, August 
24, 1878, the son of Dr. Joseph and Elizabeth S. (King) 
Fairhall. 

Dr. Joseph Fairhall was born at Settingbourne, Eng- 
land, February 5, 1853. He was educated in the public 
schools of London, England, and is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of London, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
He served for seven years as a volunteer in the Irish 
Volunteer Regiment, and was an official in the army and 

11— Vol. 2 



706 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

navy store in England until 1887. In that year he came 
to the United States with his family and settled in Chicago, 
where he became interested in the coal business as vice 
president and general manager of the Grape Creek Coal 
Company, with offices in Chicago. Later, he removed to 
Grape Creek, Illinois, and conducted his various business 
interests from that place. He purchased the Grape Creek 
Clay Works in 1890 and operated the only clay products 
company in that section of the country for a number of 
years. Doctor Fairhall began the practice of medicine 
at Grape Creek in 1894 and three years later settled at 
Danville, where he has continued in practice to the present 
time. He has offices in the Baum Building. Doctor Fair- 
hall is a Republican, a member of the Episcopal Church, 
and holds the highest office in the state as major general 
and department commander of the Patriarchs Militant 
branch of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is 
also vice president of the Sovereign Grand Lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Elizabeth S. (King) 
Fairhall, to whom he was married on November 17, 1877, 
was born at Ashford, Kent County, England, February 9, 
1853, and died March 25, 1928. Mrs. Fairhall was identi- 
fied since 1901 with the Ladies Auxiliary of the Patriarch 
Militant and was the organizer of this branch. She was 
the first president and is known throughout the United 
States and Canada as "Mother" Fairhall and at her death 
a monument was erected at Springhill Cemetery, Danville, 
by the ladies of United States and Canada, belonging to 
this branch and was dedicated or unveiled on June 2, 1929. 
She is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. To Dr. 
and Mrs. Fairhall were born four children: Joseph, Jr., 
the subject of this sketch ; Leo Victor, M. D., lives at Dan- 
ville; Lawrence Turner, instructor in chemistry, Harvard 
University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a World War 
veteran, having served as a major with the Chemical War- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 707 

fare Division ; and Lucy Winifred, married Lloyd G. Smith, 
lives in New York City. 

Dr. Joseph Fairhall, Sr., is the son of Joseph and Esther 
(Barns) Fairhall. He was born at Queensboro, Isle of 
Sheppy, Kent County, England, August 12, 1813, and died 
at Milton, England, August 18, 1885. His parents were 
Joseph and Ellen (Weller) Fairhall. He was born in Lin- 
field, Sussex County, England, in 1782 and died in 1885. 
His wife was born at Queensboro, Isle of Sheppy, Kent 
County, England. 

The name of Fairhall was originally spelled "Faire- 
halle," and appears in the records as such in England. 
One of the heirlooms of the Fairhall family, which has 
been owned by the family for many generations, is a clock, 
which is estimated to be three hundred years old. 

Joseph Fairhall, Jr., the subject of this sketch, received 
his schooling in London, England, and Danville. He was 
an apprentice to William Stewart, who operated the Dan- 
ville Foundry and Machine Company, in whose employ he 
remained for four years. He then went with Robert 
Holmes & Brothers, in charge of electric work in their 
shop. In 1902 Mr. Fairhall established an electrical repair- 
ing and machine shop at 6 South Gilbert Street, where he 
specialized principally in the maintenance of elevators in 
office buildings in Danville. Mr. Fairhall is now manu- 
facturers agent and service manager for the Warner Ele- 
vator Manufacturing Company, of Cincinnati, Ohio. He 
was the first amateur wireless operator to be licensed in 
Danville, and for a number of years was engaged in the 
work of manufacturing radio sets. 

On May 1, 1928, Mr. Fairhall married Miss Evelyn S. 
Smith, of Danville, the daughter of John M. and Martha 
J. (Morris) Smith, natives of Indiana. Mr. Smith died in 
1906 and is buried near Covington, Indiana. His widow 
lives at Danville. 



708 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mr. Fairhall is a member of the Episcopal Church, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Danville Lodge, No. 69; 
Marsh Encampment, Lodge No. 46; Danville Canton, P. M. 
No. 11, past captain, and was commissioned this year adju- 
tant to Brig. Gen. 0. C. Poltorff, commanding the Second 
Brigade of Illinois with rank of major; and Modern Wood- 
men of America. He is a Republican. Mr. Fairhall is past 
president of the Vermilion County Radio Association, and 
is identified with the American Radio Relay League, and 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 



Lewis R. French, who is connected with the French- 
Caughron Insurance Agency, with offices in the Jacobs 
Building, is among the prominent young business men of 
Danville. He was born at Armstrong, Vermilion County, 
June 22, 1890, the son of Dr. Truman P. and Eugenia (Rob- 
inson) French. 

Dr. Truman P. French, deceased, was a native of 
Indiana, born at Terre Haute, in 1851. His wife was born 
at Princeville, Illinois, and now resides in Chicago. Doctor 
French removed to Armstrong, Illinois, with his parents 
when he was a small child. He was educated in the dis- 
trict schools and read medicine with Doctor Messner, of 
Potomac, Illinois. He later was graduated from Butler 
Medical College with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
and engaged in practice at Ogden, Illinois, later at Arm- 
strong, Illinois, and in 1891 he removed to David City, 
Nebraska, where he remained until 1910. From that time 
until shortly before his death he engaged in practice at 
Danville. He died in 1920 and is buried at Armstrong. 
Doctor French was a Republican, a member of the Meth- 
odist Church, and Potomac Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and Knights Templar. He was also 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 709 

identified with the Vermilion County Medical Society, the 
Illinois State Medical Society, and the American Medical 
Association. He was the son of Ersom French, a native 
of Bowling Green, Indiana. To Dr. Truman P. and 
Eugenia (Robinson) French were born four sons: Dr. 
G. M., born in 1879, died in 1925, was a leading physician 
of Danville and Springfield, Illinois, served with the rank 
of captain, Medical Corps, United States Army, during the 
World War; M. D., president of the Columbia Industrial 
Machinery Company, Chicago, Illinois; Lewis R., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and E. H., who is connected with the 
engineering department of the Illinois Bell Telephone 
Company, Chicago. 

Lewis R. French was educated in the public schools of 
David City, Nebraska, and Danville, being graduated from 
Danville High School in 1907. The following year was 
spent at Brown's Business College, and later Mr. French 
attended the School of Law, University of Texas. He 
then went with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad 
and in 1912 went to Chicago, where he accepted a posi- 
tion in the general offices of the Studebaker Automobile 
Company. The following year he went to LaPorte, 
Indiana, with the Rumley Company, manufacturers of 
tractors, and served as assistant Canadian collection man- 
ager. Subsequently, Mr. French became associated with 
the Aetna Insurance Company, Chicago, in charge of the 
accounting department. He resigned from that position 
in 1924 and has since been identified with the Springfield 
Life Insurance Company, as general agent, located at Dan- 
ville. On April 15, 1929, the French-Caughron Insurance 
Company was organized. 

In 1913 Mr. French married Miss Chloe Eurton, the 
daughter of Joseph and Ellen Eurton, of Danville. 

In politics Mr. French is identified with the Republican 
party. He is a member of the Methodist Church, Olive 
Branch Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, No. 38; 



710 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 82; and Gao 
Grotto. He also belongs to the American Business Club 
and Chamber of Commerce. 



Carl H. Twietmeyer, who is successfully engaged in the 
real estate business in Danville, with offices at 114 East 
Main Street, is a native of Missouri. He was born at Saint 
Louis, November 20, 1881, the son of Fred and Henrietta 
(Kleintoph) Twietmeyer. 

Fred Twietmeyer, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil 
War. Both he and his wife were natives of Germany. He 
was born at Hanover, in 1839, and emigrated to the United 
States in 1859. He settled at Saint Louis, Missouri. Dur- 
ing the Civil War he enlisted at Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
served with the Union Army. He was with General Sher- 
man on his march to the sea and served throughout the 
entire war period, being honorably discharged at Washing- 
ton, District of Columbia. After the war Mr. Twietmeyer 
went to Saint Louis, where he established a wholesale and 
retail grocery business. He was thus engaged until the 
time of his retirement. Mr. Twietmeyer ranked among 
the representative business men of Saint Louis. He died 
at Vincennes, Indiana, in 1925 and his wife died in 1898. 
Both are buried at Vincennes. Mr. Twietmeyer was a 
Republican and an active member of the Lutheran Church. 
The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Twiet- 
meyer: Fred, lives at Vincennes, Indiana; Herman, lives 
at Vincennes, Indiana; August, lives at Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana; Gerhart, lives at Toledo, Ohio; Carl H., the subject 
of this sketch; Clara, married Otto Yunghans, lives at 
Cleveland, Ohio; George, lives at Fort Wayne, Indiana; 
and Edward, lives at Indianapolis, Indiana. 

The education of Carl H. Twietmeyer was obtained in 
the Lutheran parochial schools of Vincennes, Indiana. He 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 711 

is also a graduate of Vincennes Business College. Mr. 
Twietmeyer was associated with his father's business for 
a period of twelve years and then went to Saint Paul, Min- 
nesota, where he became associated with the Lienke & 
Warner Company, wholesale dry goods merchants. From 
there he later went to Champaign, Illinois, where he estab- 
lished a branch office of the Milwaukee Sanitary Cleaning 
Company, in charge of twenty-five salesmen. Mr. Twiet- 
meyer came to Danville in 1917, where he has since been 
interested in the real estate business. He extends his 
activities to city and farm property and is widely known 
as a real estate broker. 

In 1905 Mr. Twietmeyer married Miss Catherine Appel. 
They have a son, Howard Carl, who attends Trinity Luth- 
eran School. 

Mr. Twietmeyer is a Republican and a member of Trin- 
ity Lutheran Church. He also belongs to the Chamber of 
Commerce. 



C. Harvey Pearson is one of the most progressive young 
business men of Danville, where he is connected with the 
Vermilion County Abstract Company as secretary and 
manager. He was born near Allerton, Champaign Coun- 
ty, Illinois, May 31, 1898, the son of John F. and Margaret 
E. (Hayes) Pearson. 

John F. Pearson was born near Stockholm, Sweden, in 
1859, and his wife is a native of Illinois. He came to this 
country about 1877 and settled in Danville, where he was 
employed for a number of years by the Wabash Railroad 
and the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. Upon his 
removal to Champaign County he farmed until 1906, at 
which time he retired and settled at Allerton, Illinois. He 
has lived at Danville since 1923. Mr. Pearson is a Repub- 
lican and a member of the First Presbyterian Church. 
There are five children in the Pearson family, as follows: 



712 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Debbie L., married Walter Bean, lives at Danville; J. Roy, 
married Lela Clem, lives at Danville, and he is a World 
War veteran, having served with the Air Corps; C. Harvey, 
the subject of this sketch; Edith Florence, deceased; and 
Florence M., lives at home. 

C. Harvey Pearson attended the public schools of Aller- 
ton, Illinois, and after his graduation from high school 
attended Brown's Business College, Danville. He then 
was identified with the Danville Malleable Iron Company 
as a stenographer. Later, he was employed as paymaster 
and assistant superintendent by the Carson-Payson Con- 
struction Company and the Arnold Construction Company 
of Chicago, Illinois, in charge of building railroad shops at 
Richmond, Virginia. In 1919 Mr. Pearson became asso- 
ciated with the Vermilion County Abstract Company in a 
stenographic capacity and soon became abstracter. He 
was appointed secretary and manager in 1927. 

In 1918 Mr. Pearson was united in marriage with Miss 
Goldie B. Musk, the daughter of Ernest and Minnie 
(Songer) Musk, of Rossville, Illinois. To them have been 
born five children: William Robert, born in 1919; Beverly 
Jane, born in 1920; Helen Louise, born in 1922; Marjorie 
Ellen, born in 1925; and Betty Lou, born in 1928. 

Mr. Pearson is a Republican. He is a director of the 
American Business Club and a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce. 



Harold C. Crays is popular throughout Vermilion 
County as the vice president and efficient cashier of the 
First National Bank of Rossville, with which institution 
he has been officially identified since 1919. He was born 
at Armstrong, Vermilion County, in 1894, the son of 
George E. and Lizzie (Collison) Crays. 

George E. Crays was born in Macoupin County, Illinois, 
November 16, 1863. He engaged in teaching school in 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 713 

early life but afterward turned his attention to commercial 
pursuits, being employed as clerk in a general store for 
about a year. Subsequently he was engaged in the mer- 
chandising business at Armstrong, in association with E. 
A. Brown for a period of twelve years, conducting the 
enterprise under the firm name of Brown & Crays. At 
the end of that time he became associated with Samuel Col- 
lison, and later purchased the Citizens Bank of Rossville, 
which was later reorganized as the First National Bank of 
Rossville. George E. Crays served as cashier of the insti- 
tution until he was succeeded in office by his son, Harold 
C. Crays, in 1919, since which time he has occupied the 
presidency thereof. 

Harold C. Crays received his early education in the 
grade and high schools of Rossville and continued his 
studies in Culver Military Academy, Culver, Indiana. He 
then entered the banking business, in which he has con- 
tinued to the present time. He was successfully connected 
with financial institutions at Willisville, Illinois, Dieterich, 
Illinois, Cayuga, Indiana, and East Chicago, Indiana, being 
in the East Chicago State Bank at the latter named place. 
It was in 1919 that he assumed the present duties as cashier 
of the First National Bank of Rossville, which he has since 
represented in that official capacity and in the successful 
management of which his efforts constitute an important 
factor. Mr. Crays is also president of the Citizens State 
Bank, at Williamsport, Indiana. 

In 1920 Mr. Crays was united in marriage with Miss 
Louise Andrews, the daughter of Charles Andrews, a suc- 
cessful banker of Pence, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Crays 
have a daughter, Alice Louise. Mrs. Crays takes an active 
part in the social and civic affairs of the community in 
which she lives. 

In his political views Mr. Crays is a stanch Republican, 
and he is now serving as mayor of Rossville. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Benevolent and 



714 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; Rossville Lodge, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Mohammed Temple; American Le- 
gion; and Hubbard Trail Country Club. 

During the World War Mr. Grays volunteered for serv- 
ice in 1917 and was assigned to a machine gun company 
at Houston, Texas. In May, 1917, he went overseas with 
the One Hundred Thirtieth Infantry, Thirty-third Divi- 
sion. Subsequently he was transferred to the Fifth Divi- 
sion. He was discharged May 15, 1919, with the rank of 
first lieutenant. 



Donald J. McFerren. — Ranking high among the promi- 
nent young men of Hoopeston is Donald J. McFerren, who 
is vice president of the First National Bank and a veteran 
of the World War. He was born here January 31, 1891, 
the son of Jacob S. and Lida (Schultz) McFerren. 

A sketch of Jacob S. McFerren appears elsewhere in 
this history. 

Donald J. McFerren received his early education in the 
public schools of Hoopeston and later attended Hotchkiss 
School and Philips Exeter Academy. He is a graduate of 
Yale University, where he received the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in 1914. Throughout his business career he has 
been identified with the First National Bank of Hoopeston, 
having been elected to his present office as vice president 
in 1916. He is also vice president of the Hoopeston Can- 
ning Company. 

During the World War Mr. McFerren served in the 
United States Navy, aviation section, and was stationed at 
Akron, Ohio, and later at Pensacola, Florida. He was dis- 
charged from the service in December, 1918. 

In 1915 Mr. McFerren married Miss Marie Stewart, the 
daughter of Charles P. and Frances (Beech) Stewart, resi- 
dents of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Mr. Stewart was born in 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 715 

Iowa and his wife is a native of New York City. There 
are two children in the McFerren family: Marie Stewart, 
born in July, 1918, and Frances J., born in December, 1923. 
Mr. McFerren is a Republican and has held the office of 
mayor of Hoopeston, being elected for a four year term 
in 1925. He is a member of Hoopeston Lodge, No. 709, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Mohammed Shrine; American Le- 
gion; Lions Club; Hubbard Trail Country Club; Commer- 
cial Club; Chamber of Commerce; Cloister Club of Yale; 
and Yale Alumni Association. 



Wesley L. Berkey, a veteran of the World War, is 
among the substantial men of Hoopeston, where he is 
superintendent of the Vermilion Malleable Iron Company. 
He was born at Cassopolis, Michigan, June 22, 1878, the 
son of Noah and Isabel (Leer) Berkey. 

Noah Berkey, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil War. 
He was born in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, April 1, 
1840. He enlisted in the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry 
early in the Civil War and later served with an Indiana 
outfit. After the close of the war he returned to Elkhart 
County, Indiana, where he farmed and also engaged in 
general contracting. He was living retired at the time of 
his death, April 1, 1906. His wife, born in Elkhart County, 
Indiana, February 2, 1846, died August 27, 1917. Both are 
buried at Goshen, Indiana. Mr. Berkey was a Republican, 
a member of the Dunkard Church and Grand Army of the 
Republic. There were eight children in the Berkey family, 
as follows: Jennie, married I. H. Mayer, an engineer on 
the Twentieth Century Limited, New York Central Rail- 
road, lives at Elkhart, Indiana; Ada, married M. Morgen- 
thau, retired merchant, lives at Miami, Florida; Clara, 
married Edward G. Walker, assistant purchasing agent, 



716 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Sante Fe Railroad, lives in Chicago; William, deceased; 
Wesley L., the subject of this sketch; Mary; Pearl, de- 
ceased; and Grace, married C. M. Stephenson, lives at 
Elkhart, Indiana. 

Wesley L. Berkey received his education in the public 
schools of Elkhart County, Indiana, and is a graduate of 
North Manchester College. He was a teacher in the schools 
of Elkhart County for three years and taught in the same 
school during 1897 in which his mother had taught in 
1865. Mr. Berkey became identified with the New York 
Central Railroad in 1898 as a timekeeper, later served as 
brakeman, and in 1907 was promoted to conductor. Ten 
years later he removed to Kankakee, Illinois, where he 
served as yard master for the New York Central Railroad 
until 1915. Due to ill health he went to Kansas in that 
year but in January, 1916, located in Chicago as an in- 
spector for the P. and M. Company. He enlisted for 
service in the World War, April 6, 1918, and went to France 
with the Fifty-second Railway Engineers. He served as 
a transportation officer at Base Section No. 2, and was 
discharged with the rank of sergeant of first class, July 18, 
1919. He then returned to Chicago and in August, 1919, 
became an inspector for the Vermilion Iron Company at 
Hoopeston. He was promoted to superintendent of the 
plant in 1924. 

On June 11, 1921, Mr. Berkey married Miss Leota Mc- 
Coy, the daughter of Nelson and Mary (Finley) McCoy, 
of Hoopeston, both now deceased. They have a son, Wil- 
liam Wesley, born January 19, 1923. 

Mr. Berkey is a Republican, and has served as alder- 
man. He is a member of the American Legion and Com- 
mercial Club of Hoopeston. He is also chairman of the 
Park Committee and was instrumental in obtaining one of 
the finest swimming pools in the State for the city of 
Hoopeston. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 717 

Capt. Fred E. Earel, M. D., a veteran of the World War, 
is among the prominent young professional men of Hoopes- 
ton, where he is also serving as mayor. He was born at 
Abingdon, Illinois, January 11, 1892, the son of E. J. and 
May Helen (Elwell) Earel. 

E. J. Earel was born at Abingdon, Illinois, where he 
spent his entire life. He was reared on his father's farm 
and attended Hedding College. Throughout his life he 
engaged in general farming and stock raising and retired 
in 1895. He served as mayor of Abingdon and was promi- 
nent in Masonic circles, being Past Master of Abingdon 
Lodge, and a member of Quincy Consistory. He died Jan- 
uary 5, 1920, and his wife died December 15, 1913. Their 
children were: Harley D., who died in 1898; Ray, lives 
at Orange, California; and Fred E., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Following his graduation from Abingdon High School 
in 1910, Fred E. Earel attended Hedding College for two 
years. He received the degree of Bachelor of Science from 
the University of Illinois and was graduated from the 
Medical School of that university in 1916. He served as 
interne at Henrotin Hospital and Polyclinic Hospital, and 
began the practice of his profession at Hoopeston with his 
uncle, Dr. A. M. Earel. On June 1, 1917, Doctor Earel 
received commission in the Sanitary Train of the Illinois 
National Guard as First Lieutenant, and was transferred 
to the Federal service as the 108th Sanitary Train, Field 
Hospital No. 132, Thirty-third Division. He saw active 
service in France and participated in the Somme, Saint 
Mihiel, and Meuse-Argonne campaigns, being cited for 
bravery by his commanding general, Major General George 
Bell. Doctor Earel was discharged with the rank of Cap- 
tain, July 7, 1919. He came to Hoopeston in October of 
that year where he has since engaged in practice with 
Doctor R. G. Kline, with offices at 202y 2 East Main Street. 



718 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On December 30, 1919, Doctor Earel was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lilyan L. Lewis, the daughter of Morris H. 
and Lillian (Evans) Lewis, the former a native of Oxford, 
Indiana, and the latter of Hoopeston. Mr. Lewis, a retired 
paving contractor, lives at Hoopeston. His wife died in 
February, 1923. Two daughters have been born to Doctor 
and Mrs. Earel: Cecelia Marion, born May 5, 1923; and 
Rosalie Jeanne, born March 25, 1926. 

Doctor Earel has always been a Republican. He was 
elected mayor of Hoopeston, April 16, 1929. He has served 
as a member of the school board since 1926 and as its presi- 
dent during 1928-29. He is a member of the First Metho- 
dist Church, and is affiliated with Hoopeston Lodge, No. 
709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Hoopeston Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 181; Watseka Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Quincy Consistory, thirty-second de- 
gree; Arabia Shrine; Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332; Loyal Order of Moose; Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows; Modern Woodmen of America; Ira Owen 
Kraeger Post, No. 384, American Legion, charter member 
and Past Commander, 1922; Chef de Gare of "40 and 8 
Society"; Chamber of Commerce; Commercial Club; and 
Hubbard Trail Country Club. He is identified with the 
Vermilion County Medical Society; Illinois State Medical 
Society; American Medical Association; and Illinois In- 
dustrial Surgeons Society. 



Ray H. Marvin is one of the popular men of Hoopeston, 
where he has served as city clerk continuously since 1917. 
He is a native of Vermilion County, born at Cheneyville, 
June 25, 1889, the son of Jesse Elwood and Olive (Smiley) 
Marvin. 

Jesse Elwood Marvin was born in Indiana. He spent 
his early life on a farm and lived near Benton, Indiana. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 719 

As a young man he came to Cheneyville, Illinois, where he 
served as station agent for the Lake Erie & Western Rail- 
road for eleven years. He then purchased a general store 
from R. R. Zook and conducted that business for several 
years. Later, he farmed in Jefferson County, Illinois, and 
retired in 1897. He died at Hoopeston, May 5, 1899, and 
is buried in Floral Hill Cemetery. His widow, born in 
Indiana, lives at Hoopeston. Mr. Marvin was a Repub- 
lican, a member of the Christian Church, and belonged to 
Cheneyville Lodge, No. 706, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. There were five children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Marvin: Ida, married C. D. Smith, lives at Hoopeston; 
Lulu, married Frank Lee, lives at Hoopeston ; Ray H., the 
subject of this sketch; Mabel, married F. W. Perigo, lives 
at Lafayette, Indiana; and William, lives at Detroit, 
Michigan. 

Jesse Elwood Marvin was the son of William Marvin, 
a native of Indiana, who served as treasurer of Benton 
County for two terms. He was a prominent and highly 
esteemed citizen of that section of Indiana. 

Ray H. Marvin was educated in the public schools of 
Hoopeston. He learned the printer's trade in the offices of 
the Hoopeston Chronicle at the time the newspaper was 
owned by C. W. Warner. Mr. Marvin has been identified 
with this paper continuously and with D. Milburn operated 
the plant from November 1, 1920, until the paper was con- 
solidated with the Herald in April, 1921. He is now adver- 
tising compositor for the Chronicle-Herald. Mr. Marvin 
was elected city clerk of Hoopeston in April, 1917, and has 
been re-elected to the office each succeeding term, having 
held this office longer than any other person in the history 
of the city. 

In 1921 Mr. Marvin was united in marriage with Mrs. 
Florence (Skinner) Robertson, the daughter of Thomas J. 
and Rose (Hedrick) Skinner, natives of Columbus, Indiana, 
and now residents of Sloan, Indiana, where Mr. Skinner 



720 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

engages in general farming and stock raising. Mr. and 
Mrs. Marvin have no children. 

Mr. Marvin has always been a Republican. He is a 
member of Hoopeston Lodge, No. 498, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows; and Star Lodge, No. 709, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. 



Hon. E. R. E. Kimbrough, who lives retired at Danville, 
has been one of the leading figures in the judicial life of 
Vermilion County for many years, and is regarded as one 
of the most influential citizens of this section of the state 
of Illinois. He was born on a farm in Edgar County, 
Illinois, March 28, 1851, the son of Dr. Andrew H. and 
Sarah (Ashmore) Kimbrough. 

Dr. Andrew H. Kimbrough was born in Harden 
County, Kentucky, February 27, 1822, the son of Richard 
Calvin and Jane (Morrison) Kimbrough. He was a native 
of North Carolina and his wife was born in Virginia. 
Both are buried in Edgar County, Illinois. He was a vet- 
eran of the War of 1812, and was wounded at the battle 
of Horseshoe Bend, Alabama, by the Indians. Later, he 
was wounded at the battle on New Orleans. He was given 
a soldier's land grant in Edgar County, Illinois, in a sec- 
tion of Stratton Township. He settled there in 1825 but 
died at the age of 33 years from the effects of wounds suf- 
fered during the war, from which he failed to recover. 
His son, Andrew H., was educated in private schools and 
was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadel- 
phia. He settled at Georgetown, Illinois, in April, 1858, 
where he engaged in practice until 1873, at which time he 
located at Danville. He continued in practice in this city 
until his eightieth year. He died September 17, 1903, and 
is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. Doctor Kim- 
brough was a Democrat, and a member of the Vermilion 
County Medical Society, Illinois Medical Society, and 




E. R. E. KIMBKOUGH 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 721 

American Medical Association. Sarah (Ashmore) Kim- 
brough was born in Clark County, Illinois, April 10, 1820, 
and died August 4, 1904. She was the daughter of Amos 
and Patience (Maguire) Ashmore, the former a native of 
Virginia and the latter of Tennessee. Both are buried at 
Yankee Point, Illinois. They settled in Clark County, Illi- 
nois, in 1808, where Mr. Ashmore engaged in contract work 
on the old National Road, now known as Route No. 40. To 
Dr. Andrew H. and Sarah (Ashmore) Kimbrough were 
born three children: Laura, who died January 2, 1929; 
E. R. E., the subject of this sketch; and Dill, who died 
April 28, 1921. 

E. R. E. Kimbrough attended the district schools of 
Vermilion County. He was graduated from Illinois State 
Normal School in June, 1873, and then read law in the of- 
fices of Judge E. S. Terry, being admitted to the Illinois 
bar in January, 1876. He then became a partner in prac- 
tice with W. D. Lindsey, who is 1882 was elected county 
treasurer of Vermilion County. Mr. Kimbrough then 
practiced alone until 1889, when he became associated with 
James Meeks until June, 1903, at which time Mr. Kim- 
brough was elected circuit judge. He was re-elected to this 
office in 1909 and again in 1915, but at that time retired. 
In 1882 he was elected to the thirty-third General Assembly 
as a State Representative, and re-elected in 1884 to the 
thirty-fourth General Assembly. 

In April, 1907, Mr. Kimbrough was elected mayor of 
Danville on the Independent ticket. For twenty-five years 
he was a member of the Illinois State Educational Board, 
serving from 1893 until the time that the Board was abol- 
ished by Governor Lowden. He also served as a member 
of the Danville School Board for nine years. 

In January, 1916, Judge Kimbrough went to Tensas 
Parish, Louisiana, where he remained until May, 1919. 
He has since lived retired at Danville. 

12— Vol. 2 



722 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On September 14, 1876, Judge Kimbrough was united 
in marriage with Miss Julia C. Tincher, the daughter of 
John L. and Caroline R. (Hicks) Tincher, natives of Ken- 
tucky and Indiana, respectively. Mr. Tincher was one of 
the organizers of the First National Bank of Danville and 
served for many years as State Representative. He had 
organized the Tincher & English Bank, Danville, in 1857. 
Mr. Tincher died December 17, 1871, while serving as 
Senator from his District. He is buried in Danville. Julia 
C. (Tincher) Kimbrough died April 20, 1907, and is buried 
in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. A son born to Judge 
and Mrs. Kimbrough, Robert T., is deceased. 

Judge Kimbrough is identified with the Vermilion 
County Bar Association, Illinois State Bar Association, 
and American Bar Association. He is affiliated with 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332. He is 
vice president of The First National Bank, Danville. 

Judge Kimbrough is one of the interesting pioneers of 
Danville. Among the incidents of his early life which are 
of especial appeal to his listeners, who enjoy hearing of his 
personal experiences during the early days, is the story of 
his first trip to Danville from Georgetown, which was made 
in 1858 by ferry boat. He also tells of running away from 
home when 11 years of age to enlist for service in the Civil 
War. He attempted to enlist in the Seventy-third Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry but was rejected on account of his 
extreme youth. 



John Brady Wallbridge. — Not only in Hoopeston, but 
throughout Vermilion County and the State of Illinois, 
John Brady Wallbridge, deceased, was known for many 
years as a leading member of the legal fraternity. He 
was born at Mayville, Chautauqua County, New York, 
June 24, 1851, the son of Wing Killey and Hannah Malvina 
(Brady) Wallbridge. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 723 

Wing Killey Wallbridge was born in Canada, April 19, 
1808, and his wife was born at Dover, New York, May 30, 
1810. He died at Boone, Iowa, October 1, 1869, and his 
wife died October 31, 1869. Both are buried in Iowa. Mr. 
Wallbridge came to the United States from Canada early 
in life and for a number of years operated a hotel at May- 
ville, New York. He removed to Boone, Iowa, about 1859 
and later lived at Fort Dodge, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Wing 
K. Wallbridge's surviving daughter, Edith, is the wife 
of Henry James Carr, and lives at Scranton, Pennsylvania. 

Hannah Malvina (Brady) Wallbridge was the daughter 
of John P. and Lydia (Parks) Brady. He was born at 
Dover, New York, in 1780 and died February 22, 1858. 
His wife, also born at Dover, New York, in 1789, died No- 
vember 11, 1858. Their marriage took place in 1806. Lydia 
(Parks) Brady was the daughter of Jacob and Deborah 
(Stevens) Parks. He was born in New York, March 6, 
1757, and died October 9, 1845. His wife was born Decem- 
ber 25, 1761, and died September 19, 1828. Both are buried 
at Wingdale, New York. In 1775 he enlisted as a sergeant 
for volunteer service in Capt. P. Woodard's company, and 
under Colonel Schenck and General Lee, being honorably 
discharged in 1776. The following year he enlisted in 
Capt. William Pearce's company and later served with 
James Martin at Valentine Heights. He re-enlisted again 
in 1878 as a second sergeant in Captain Pearce's company 
and served under General Putnam. 

Wing Killey Wallbridge was the son of Elijah and 
Catherine (Killey) Wallbridge. He was born at Norwich, 
Connecticut, January 7, 1752, and died October 3, 1842. 
His wife, born January 3, 1766, died December 1, 1848. 
Both are buried at Quaker Hill, New York. Elijah Wall- 
bridge was the son of Zebulon and Sarah (Forbes) Wall- 
bridge. He was born at Norwich, Connecticut, July 17, 
1718, and died April 27, 1809. His wife, born at Preston, 
Connecticut, September 3, 1717, died March 19, 1795. Both 



724 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

are buried at Stamford, New York. Zebulon Wallbridge 
was the son of William and Abigail (Lawrence) Wall- 
bridge. He was born at Preston, Connecticut, March 20, 
1690. He was married on June 27, 1713. Both he and his 
wife are buried at Norwich, Connecticut. William Wall- 
bridge was the son of Henry and Anna (Amos) Wallbridge. 
He was born in England. He was married at Preston, 
Connecticut, December 25, 1688. He died July 25, 1729. 
His wife, born at Boston, Massachusetts, June 28, 1666, 
died in June, 1751. 

John Brady Wallbridge, the subject of this sketch, was 
educated in the schools of Mayville, New York, and also 
attended school at Boone, Iowa. He was graduated from 
Hillsdale (Michigan) College. In 1873 he went to Bis- 
marck, where he studied telegraphy, and in 1880 he came 
to Hoopeston as agent for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
Railroad. Later, he was transferred to Doland, South Da- 
kota, as agent for the same company, and from there went 
to Frankfort, South Dakota, where he served as post- 
master. In the meantime Mr. Wallbridge continued his 
studies and was admitted to the bar of South Dakota, and 
subsequently practiced his profession at Frankfort, South 
Dakota. During the administration of President Harrison 
he was appointed chief clerk of the Indian agency at Green- 
wood, South Dakota, and served in that capacity for four 
years. He returned to Hoopeston in 1894 and was admitted 
to the Illinois bar. He then engaged in practice with James 
H. Dyer, under the firm name of Dyer & Wallbridge. This 
partnership continued until 1906 and Mr. Wallbridge en- 
gaged in practice alone thereafter until his death, August 
5, 1923. 

Mr. Wallbridge was married April 18, 1883, to Miss 
Jennie Dyer. She died September 21, 1902. A child was 
born to this union, Edith L., also deceased. On September 
7, 1908, Mr. Wallbridge was united in marriage with Miss 
Grace Eleanor Schwartz, the daughter of Rev. William 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 725 

Henry and Martha Eleanor (Bales) Schwartz, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this history. To this union no 
children were born. 

Politically, Mr. Wallbridge was a Republican. He was 
identified with the Vermilion County Bar Association, Illi- 
nois Bar Association, and American Bar Association. Fra- 
ternally, he was affiliated with Star Lodge, No. 709, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Hoopeston Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, No. 181; Athlestan Commandery, Knights 
Templar, No. 35; Danville Consistory, thirty-second de- 
gree; Medinah Temple; and Hamilton Club of Chicago. 



Rev. William H. Schwartz, deceased, was an outstand- 
ing member of the community in which he lived, and a 
member of one of the first families of Vermilion County. 
He died at Hoopeston, January 7, 1913. Reverend Schwartz 
was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, January 11, 1850, 
the son of John Henry and Catherine (Wyant) Schwartz. 

John Henry Schwartz was born in Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania, where his ancestors had settled many years 
before. The family is of German origin and the Wyant 
family is of English descent, being directly descended from 
the Oldenbergs, early settlers of Pennsylvania. John 
Henry Schwartz was born July 17, 1809, and died July 7, 
1885. His wife, born October 13, 1806, died April 22, 1876. 
John Henry Schwartz was the son of Conrad (3rd) and 
Mary (Pinkerton) Schwartz. He was born December 6, 
1784, and died October 9, 1818. His wife was born Feb- 
ruary 20, 1789, and died June 19, 1833. Conrad (3rd) 
Schwartz was the son of Conrad (2nd) and Anna Maria 
(Losser) Schwartz. He was born March 10, 1744, and 
died March 10, 1820. She was born November 1, 1748, and 
died April 7, 1807. They were married on January 18, 
1769. He was the first president of the Farmers State 



726 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Bank, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He also served as a 
private in Capt. Jasper Yeates' company, of Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, under Col. M. Slough. On October 25, 1777, 
he was commissioned quartermaster of the Fifth Battalion 
of Lancaster County Militia under Col. Jacob Clotz, and 
served with distinction throughout the war. Conrad (2nd) 
Schwartz was the son of Conrad Schwartz, who was born 
in Germany in 1707. He came to the United States Sep- 
tember 3, 1739, from Rotterdam on the ship "Friendship", 
and was among the first settlers of Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania. He died in 1790. 

William H. Schwartz was educated in the district 
schools of Butler Township, Vermilion County. His fam- 
ily had come to this county in 1856. They became prosper- 
ous farmers of this section and William H. Schwartz early 
manifested an interest in farming. He rented his father's 
farm of two hundred acres and engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock raising for a period of thirty-three years. 
He then purchased the estate after his father's death. 
This is the present site of the town of Riley. He also 
devoted much time to the study of theology and in 1879 
was licensed as a local preacher. He entered the ministry 
in 1883, and spent nine years as a preacher in Champaign 
County, Illinois. He subsequently located at Danville, Illi- 
nois, and spent one year in the Jacksonville district as a 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Due to ill 
health, Reverend Schwartz was obliged to retire from the 
ministry. He devoted his entire interests thereafter to 
farming until 1906, at which time he retired and moved to 
Hoopeston. He then purchased an interest in the Thorn- 
ton Buggy Company, later known as the Hoopeston Buggy 
Company, and he served as president of the company for 
three years. When the company was reorganized he be- 
came secretary. 

Reverend Schwartz was married on June 30, 1872, to 
Miss Martha E. Bales, the daughter of Caleb T. Bales, a 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 727 

native of Tennessee and an early settler of Butler Town- 
ship, Vermilion County. She died February 10, 1929. To 
this union the following children were born : Esther Cath- 
erine, married Frank H.Sherfy, lives at Sheffield, Alabama; 
Grace E., the widow of John B. Wallbridge, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this history ; Elizabeth E., mar- 
ried D. H. Shiveler, lives at Hoopeston; and Leora Zerita, 
school teacher, lives at Des Plaines, Illinois. 

Reverend Schwartz was a member of Star Lodge, No. 
709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He was a Re- 
publican and served for three years as collector of Butler 
Township. He was also trustee of Lakeview Hospital, 
Danville, and was widely known for his philanthropic and 
humanitarian work. His death was a distinct loss to the 
community. 



M. Ernest Nink is one of the most popular young men 
of Hoopeston, where he is city editor of the Chronicle- 
Herald. He was born at Ottawa, Illinois, April 27, 1905, 
the son of Martin Ernest and Nellie (Tully) Nink. 

Martin Ernest Nink was born at LaSalle, Illinois, and 
was educated in the public schools there. Early in life he 
became associated with his father, Valentine Nink, in the 
wholesale cigar business. Later he was connected with the 
Milwaukee Railway Company and for many years was 
associated with E. V. Yockey in the laundry business at 
Ottawa, Illinois. The business was later sold to Charles 
E. Beck and was thereafter known as the Illinois Laundry 
Company. Mr. Nink continued as manager until 1917 at 
which time he entered the employ of the Chicago Retort 
and Fire Brick Company as timekeeper and paymaster. 
In 1922 he became identified with Bradford's Laundry and 
the following year purchased the business in partnership 
with Charles Marsh. Mr. Nink is still identified with this 
enterprise at Ottawa. He is a Democrat, a member of 



728 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Saint Columbus Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus, 
Catholic Order of Forresters, Knights of Maccabees, and 
German Benevolent Society. Mr. and Mrs. Nink are the 
parents of the following children: M. Ernest, the subject 
of this sketch; Anna, Raymond, Catherine, Louise, and 
John Vincent, all at home. 

M. Ernest Nink received his education in the parochial 
schools of Ottawa and in 1922 was graduated from Ottawa 
High School. He then entered the employ of the National 
Fireproofing Corporation at Ottawa as a timekeeper, and 
in August, 1922, went with the Free Trader-Journal Pub- 
lishing Company as a member of the editorial staff, and as 
sports editor. Later he became city editor. February 1, 
1926, he came to Hoopeston as city editor of the Chronicle- 
Herald, in which capacity he now serves. He is also a 
director of the Aldrich Printing and Publishing Company, 
Hoopeston. 

Mr. Nink is a Democrat, a member of Saint Anthony's 
Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus, Lions Club and 
Chamber of Commerce. He is vice president of the Booster 
Club of Hoopeston. Mr. Nink is unmarried. 



Isaac Thomas Lukens, deceased, was one of the most 
highly esteemed citizens of Hoopeston, and his career in 
the business and civic life of the community won for him 
the confidence and trust of all who knew him. He was 
born at Springboro, Ohio, March 25, 1842, the son of Rich- 
ard Moore and Caroline S. (Thomas) Lukens. 

Richard Moore Lukens was born near Philadelphia, 
August 23, 1812. He was a potter by trade and became 
well known as a manufacturer of pottery. The family re- 
moved to Hoopeston in 1873, where Mr. Lukens lived re- 
tired until his death, September 14, 1890. His wife was 
born near Philadelphia, March 18, 1820, and died Novem- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 729 

ber 20, 1899. Both are buried in Floral Hill Cemetery, 
Hoopeston. 

Richard Moore Lukens was the son of Perry and Mary 
(Moore) Lukens. He was born in 1782 and she was born 
July 11, 1784. Both were born near Philadelphia. Perry 
Lukens was the son of Renier and Mary Jane (Perry) 
Lukens. He was born in 1758 and was the son of William 
and M. (Pennington) Lukens. The geneology of the 
Lukens family may be found in the New York Public 
Library. William Lukens was the son of William and 
Elizabeth (Tyson) Luckens, the name originally having 
been spelled Luckens. William Luckens was the son of 
Jan Luckens. Mary (Moore) Lukens, wife of Perry 
Lukens, was the daughter of Henry and Priscilla (Jack- 
son) Moore. He was born May 29, 1753, in Montgomery 
County, Pennsylvania, and died in 1829. He served in 
Captain John Taylor's Company of the Seventh Battalion, 
Cumberland County (Pennsylvania) Militia, commanded 
by Col. James Purdy, and was honorably discharged on 
May 5, 1781. (See Page 729, Volume 23, Pennsylvania 
Archives, Third Series.) 

Henry Moore was the son of Mordeci and Elizabeth 
(Coleman) Moore. He died in Montgomery County, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1800. He was a Quaker and spent most of his 
life as a merchant in Philadelphia. Mordeci Moore was 
the son of Dr. Richard and Margaret L. (Preston) Moore. 
He was a councilman in Philadelphia and a leading physi- 
cian and surgeon of the city. He died in September, 1734. 
Margaret Lloyd Preston was the daughter of Samuel and 
Rachael (Lloyd) Preston. In 1711 he was mayor of Phila- 
delphia. He was also provincial treasurer from 1714 until 
the time of his death in 1743. Rachael Lloyd was the 
daughter of Thomas and Mary (Jones) Lloyd. He was 
born in 1640 and she was born in 1665. He died in 1686 
and she died in 1680. He was governor of Pennsylvania in 
1684, being appointed by William Penn. His grandmother, 



730 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Elizabeth Stanley, was the granddaughter of Edward I, of 
England, which name a line of ancestors to Charlemagne 
and back through the dark ages. 

Isaac Thomas Lukens, the subject of this sketch, was 
reared and educated at Springboro, Ohio. After his grad- 
uation from Springboro Academy he clerked in the gen- 
eral store at Springboro for several years and later estab- 
lished a mercantile business at Pendleton, Indiana, in part- 
nership with his brother, Charles Lukens. This business 
was finally disposed of and Mr. Lukens removed to Hoopes- 
ton in 1872, where he established the first general mercan- 
tile business and which was successfully conducted by him 
for many years. He then became identified with an overall 
factory in Hoopeston, and was interested in that business 
until the time of his death, January 19, 1903. His wife 
died October 20, 1904. Both are buried in Floral Hill Cem- 
etery, Hoopeston. 

On May 17, 1867, Mr. Lukens was united in marriage 
with Miss Edith Satterthwaite, the daughter of Joseph M. 
and Eliza S. (Allen) Satterthwaite, natives of Bucks Coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. Both are deceased and buried in Floral 
Hill Cemetery, Hoopeston. They came west and settled 
at Rossville, Illinois, during the early days and Mr. Sat- 
terthwaite became the first postmaster of Rossville. He 
later lived at Hoopeston and was one of the founders of 
this city, being one of its leading and most influential 
citizens for many years. 

To Isaac Thomas and Edith (Satterthwaite) Lukens 
were born three children : Eliza, mention of whom is made 
below; David, died in infancy; and Hannah, who died in 
1907. She was the wife of Marion Alston, of Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Eliza Lukens married James A. Williams, the son of 
Nathan and Susan (Norman) Williams. Mr. Williams is 
a government bank receiver and was a leading merchant 
of Hoopeston for many years. He was chief clerk of the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 731 

First District Exemption Board and served for three years 
without remuneration. Mrs. Williams is a member of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution, Daughters of 
the Colonists, Colonial Dames of Ohio, and Betsy Ross 
Society. She takes an active part in the social life of the 
community and has an extensive acquaintance. Mr. and 
Mrs. Williams have a daughter, Eleanor Kent Williams, 
who was born August 5, 1912. She attends Hoopeston 
High School. 

Mr. Lukens was a Republican throughout his life. He 
was a member of the Society of Friends Church. 



C. A. Edmond Sheets is one of the dependable and well 
known citizens of Hoopeston, where he is serving as assist- 
ant postmaster. He was born at Kendallville, Indiana, 
June 1, 1884, the son of Charles J. and Julia C. (Aichele) 
Sheets. 

Charles J. Sheets was born in Germany. He was a 
tailor by trade and after coming to this country settled at 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, with his parents. Later he came to 
Hoopeston in 1904. He established a tailoring business 
here and became one of the representative members of the 
community. Mr. Sheets was living in Seattle, Washing- 
ton, at the time of his death in 1926. His wife, born in 
Rome, Georgia, died in 1918. Both are buried at Hoopes- 
ton. Mr. Sheets was a Republican and held membership 
in the Loyal Order of Moose and Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

C. A. Edmond Sheets attended the public schools of 
Auburn, Indiana, and after completing his schooling he 
went to Logansport, Indiana, where he became identified 
with the grocery business. He later returned to Kendall- 
ville, Indiana, where he was employed in the store of his 
uncle, Albert Aichele. In 1906 Mr. Sheets came to Hoopes- 



732 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ton and two years later became a clerk in the local post- 
office under Postmaster Charles W. Warner. He continued 
in that capacity until March 1, 1918, when he became assist- 
ant postmaster under William Finley. 

In 1911 Mr. Sheets was united in marriage with Miss 
Virginia McCormick, the daughter of James and Sarah 
(Ogden) McCormick, natives of Missouri, now residents 
of Bismarck, Illinois. They have the following children: 
Ruth, Dale, Helen, and Mary, all students; and Winifred, 
deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Sheets is a Republican. He holds mem- 
bership in the Church of Christ, and takes an active part 
in Sunday School work for young people. He is affiliated 
with Star Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, Lions Club, and Chamber of 
Commerce. For ten years Mr. Sheets served as secretary 
of the Hoopeston Chautauqua Association. 



William M. Beggs, who is superintendent of the Amer- 
ican Can Company of Hoopeston, is numbered among the 
progressive business men and substantial citizens of Ver- 
milion County. He was born near Mercer, Pennsylvania, 
July 10, 1886, the son of David T. and Alphina (Mounts) 
Beggs. 

David T. Beggs was born in Mercer County, Pennsyl- 
vania, as was his wife. They were among the early set- 
tlers of Mercer, where Mr. Beggs established a retail shoe 
business. In October, 1866, the family removed to Lewis- 
town, Illinois, where Mr. Beggs conducted a shoe business 
until his death in 1884. His wife died in 1899 and they are 
buried at Lewistown, Illinois. Mr. Beggs was a Democrat 
and for many years served as treasurer of Mercer County, 
Pennsylvania. He and his family held membership in the 
Presbyterian Church. The following children were born 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 733 

to Mr. and Mrs. Beggs: Lewis A., a Civil War veteran, 
deceased; Roger W. and Delia, both deceased; Ella M., 
married Eugene Munson, both deceased; Estella and Ada, 
both deceased; William M., the subject of this sketch; and 
Charles, deceased. 

The education of William M. Beggs was obtained in the 
schools of Lewistown, Illinois, and following his gradua- 
tion from high school he entered the employ of the Union 
Can Company, being made foreman of the plant in 1894. 
The factory was subsequently removed to Hoopeston and 
Mr. Beggs came to this city as factory superintendent. In 
1901 the American Can Company was organized and at 
that time the Union Can Company was merged with the 
new enterprise. Mr. Beggs was retained as manager of 
the American Can Company and is factory superintendent 
of the Hoopeston plant. Originally, the plant employed 
about two hundred people as compared with four hundred 
and fifty on the company payroll at the present time. 

In 1896 Mr. Beggs married Miss Catherine Hunter, the 
daughter of William and Catherine Hunter, the former a 
native of England and the latter of Ireland. Both are 
deceased. Mr. Hunter was a well known brick mason and 
building contractor of Lewistown, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. 
Beggs have no children. 

Politically, Mr. Beggs is a Democrat. He is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce. 



W. R. Lowery. — Numbered among the prominent edu- 
cators of Vermilion County is W. R. Lowery, who is super- 
intendent of schools at Hoopeston. He was born at Free- 
port, Ohio, in 1882, the son of John and Mary (Alexander) 
Lowery. 

John Lowery was born in Ireland. He was a lumber- 
man and contractor and after coming to this country lived 



734 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

in Ohio. He served with the One Hundred Fifty-ninth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War under Lew 
Wallace. Mr. Lowery died May 8, 1908, and is buried at 
Londonderry, Ohio. His widow, born at Freeport, Ohio, is 
still a resident of that place. Their children were : T. J., 
lives at Freeport, Ohio ; J. G., lives at New Concord, Ohio ; 
G. C, lives at Akron, Ohio; Mrs. Margaret McElhattan, 
lives at Freeport, Ohio; and W. R., the subject of this 
sketch. 

W. R. Lowery received his early education in the rural 
schools of Ohio. He was graduated from Muskingum 
College with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1909 and 
later took graduate work at the University of Chicago and 
Illinois University. He began his teaching career in the 
district schools of Ohio, with which he was identified from 
1903 until 1905; he then was a member of the faculty of 
Muskingum Academy from 1907 until 1909; was a teacher 
in Hoopeston High School from 1909 until 1913; principal 
of Hoopeston High School from 1913 until 1916; and be- 
came superintendent of city schools in 1916. 

In 1913 Mr. Lowery married Miss Minnie Westfall, of 
Hoopeston, the daughter of Calvin F. and Annie (Robin- 
son) Westfall. They have a daughter, Mary Ann, born 
May 1, 1918. 

Mr. Lowery is a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, Masonic Lodge and Consistory, Modern Woodmen 
of America, and Lions Club. 



Chester S. Berry, who is superintendent of schools at 
Rankin, is one of the prominent figures in education in 
Vermilion County. He is a native of Pleasant Hill, Pike 
County, Illinois, born December 6, 1891, the son of James 
R. and Nancy Margaret (Butler) Berry. 

James R. Berry was born near Pleasant Hill, Illinois, 
February 4, 1847, the son of Willis Franklin Berry, a 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 735 

native of Kentucky and one of the earliest settlers of Pike 
County, Illinois. James R. Berry was a farmer through- 
out his life. He served as justice of the peace and as a 
member of the school board. He was an active member 
of the Methodist Church and belonged to the Masonic 
Lodge and Modern Woodmen of America. Nancy Mar- 
garet (Butler) Berry was born near Pleasant Hill, Illinois, 
November 16, 1850, the daughter of Darius Butler. She 
died February 11, 1924. Both she and her husband are 
buried in Wells Cemetery, Pleasant Hill, Illinois. Mr. and 
Mrs. Berry were the parents of the following children: 
Willis Elma, born December 4, 1877, married Dr. John 
Harold Cromwell, lives at Gooding, Idaho; Clifford Earl, 
born February 6, 1881, lives at Gooding, Idaho; Lucy 
Mabel, born March 17, 1882, married Willis E. Rodeniser, 
lives at Lead, South Dakota; John Neil, born November 
16, 1886, lives at Gooding, Idaho; James Halford, born 
March 4, 1889, a World War veteran, lives at San Jose, 
California; and Chester S., the subject of this sketch. 

Chester S. Berry attended the district schools of Pike 
County, Illinois, and was graduated from Pittsfield High 
School in 1910. He attended Illinois College and began his 
teaching career at Martinsburg, Illinois, in 1911. From 
1912 until 1914 he attended college and returned again in 
1917, in which year he received his degree, Bachelor of 
Arts. During 1914-16 he taught at Pleasant Hill High 
School. His professional career follows: 1919-20 as prin- 
cipal of Pleasant Hill High School; 1922-24 as superin- 
tendent of schools at Nebo, Illinois, and 1924-30 as super- 
intendent of schools at Rankin. 

On November 24, 1920, Mr. Berry was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Helen Clark, the daughter of Horace L. 
and Alice (Webster) Clark, natives of Pike County, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Clark lives at Urbana, Illinois. His wife is 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Berry have two children : Marion 



736 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Louise, born February 1, 1922; and James Wesley, born 
March 23, 1926. 

Mr. Berry is independent in politics. He is active in 
the work of the Methodist Church, of which he has served 
as Sunday School superintendent for five years. He is a 
member of Rankin Lodge, No. 725, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and belongs to Phi Alpha Literary 
Society. 



William James Haskell, retired, is numbered among the 
substantial and highly esteemed citizens of Danville. He 
was born at Des Moines, Iowa, September 21, 1871, the 
son of William and Hester Ann (Heskett) Haskell. 

William Haskell, deceased, was a native of Ohio. He 
was a farmer and early in life went to Iowa with his par- 
ents. He died at Des Moines in 1875, and his widow lives 
at Pomona, California. She is the daughter of Elizabeth 
Heskett. To Mr. and Mrs. Haskell one child was born, 
William James, the subject of this sketch. 

William James Haskell began life as a newsboy. He 
attended the public schools of Iowa, Joliet, Illinois, and was 
ten years old when he was taken to Chicago where he at- 
tended school. He completed his schooling at Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana, and when sixteen years of age was a bell- 
boy in the Nutt Hotel, now the Ramsey Hotel. He also 
was employed in the Sherman and Robbins hotels and later 
learned the printer's trade while in the employ of the 
"Star." He was subsequently employed on the "Craw- 
fordsville Review" and the "Crawfordsville Argus-News." 
Later, he was a barber and after locating at Danville op- 
erated the shop in the Aetna Hotel for seven years. While 
thus employed he became interested in the sign and poster 
business and became successful in this enterprise, later in 
1915 purchasing the Danville Bill Posting Company, 
which he consolidated with the small business, which he 




WILLIAM JAMES HASKELL 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 737 

had established on a small scale. Mr. Haskell became 
president of the Danville Poster Advertising Company and 
president of the Haskell Sign System Company. Although 
he has been retired from business since 1927, Mr. Haskell 
remains as president of these two companies. 

In 1890 Mr. Haskell married Miss Eva Catherine Dud- 
denhoffer, the daughter of George and Elizabeth Dudden- 
hoffer, natives of Germany, and early settlers of Lafayette 
Indiana. Mr. Duddenhoffer later lived at Alton and finally 
settled at Danville, where he was well known as a manu- 
facturer of cigars. He is deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Haskell four children were born : Ruth, deceased ; William 
George, who died in 1921, was connected with the Ameri- 
can Steel & Wire Company, Cleveland, Ohio, as an account- 
ant, married Dorothy Goff; Esther, married C. D. Steely, 
lives at Danville, and they have two children, Catherine 
and William; and Harold, identified with the Roxanna 
Petroleum Company, Tulsa, Oklahoma. He married Alice 
Barkman, and they have two children, Philip and Betty. 

Mr. Haskell is affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge, An- 
cient, Free and Accepted Masons, No. 38; Danville Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 182 ; Vermilion Council ; Ath- 
lestan Commandery, Knights Templar No. 35; Danville 
Consistory, thirty-second degree; Gao Grotto; Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association; Roselawn Country Club; and Rotary 
Club. He is a Republican and a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. 



Edward Clarence Griffith, deceased, was one of the 

most popular business men and influential citizens of 
Hoopeston, where he was identified with the First National 
Bank in an official capacity for more than forty years. He 
was born at Leesburg, Ohio, August 3, 1850, the son of 
John and Charlotte (Whaley) Griffith. 

13— Vol. 2 



738 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

John Griffith was a native of Ohio, as was also his wife. 
He was a shoemaker by trade, and later in life owned and 
operated the Griffith House at Leesburg, Ohio. He was a 
Republican and a member of the Universalist Church. 
Both he and his wife are deceased and are buried at Lees- 
burg. They were the parents of seven children : Richard, 
deceased; Edward C., the subject of this sketch; Samuel, 
deceased; Charles, lives at Anaheim, California; Gertrude, 
Harriet, and Lillian, all deceased. 

Edward Clarence Griffith obtained his education in the 
schools of Leesburg, Ohio, and following his graduation 
from high school entered the employ of the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad as a telegraph operator. Later, he was an 
operator near Cincinnati, Ohio, and was located there until 
1883, at which time he came to Hoopeston and entered the 
employ of the First National Bank as a bookkeeper. At 
the death of James McFerren, Mr. Griffith became cashier 
of the bank, on September 8, 1884, and served in that 
capacity until 1920 when he was elected vice president and 
director. He died March 4, 1924. 

On September 13, 1877, Mr. Griffith was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Elvira B. McFerren, the daughter of Wil- 
liam and Eliza (Snyder) McFerren, the former a native 
of South Carolina and the latter of Montgomery, Ohio. 
Both are deceased and are buried in Floral Hill Cemetery, 
Hoopeston. Mr. McFerren was a prosperous merchant and 
large land owner of Level Station, Ohio, for many years 
and in later life lived at Hoopeston. There were seven 
children in the McFerren family, as follows: Amanda, 
deceased; Mary, the widow of Charles P. Huey, lives at 
Hoopeston; Elvira B. Griffith; Myrtie and Pingree, both 
deceased; Jacob S., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this history; and James, deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Griffith a daughter, Mabel Clara, was born. She was the 
wife of Robert J. Cardiff, of Hoopeston. Mrs. Cardiff died 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 739 

in 1923, leaving a son, Edward Wesley, who was born in 
1920. 

Mr. Griffith was a Republican, a member of the Univer- 
salist Church, and belonged to the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and Commercial Club. 

At the death of Mr. Griffith the following resolution 
was passed by the First National Bank of Hoopeston: 
"Whereas, Edward C. Griffith for more than forty years 
served as cashier and then as vice president of the First 
National Bank, Hoopeston, by his extensive friendship and 
acquainted through the surrounding country was so 
greatly instrumental in the building up of this bank, died 
March 4th, in Saint Petersburg, Florida. Whereas, the 
loss of so prominent and worthy a man who was such a 
guide and help to this institution through his enduring 
efforts and extreme faithfulness, is keenly felt by not 
only the officers and employes of this bank, but by every- 
one who has ever known him. Be it resolved, by the Board 
of Directors of the First National Bank of Hoopeston, by 
unanimous vote at this meeting held the 15th day of March, 
1924, we deplore the death of so worthy an officer and 
hereby have this resolution spread upon the minutes of 
this meeting upon our records." 



Merritt Andrew Southwick, deceased, was numbered 
among the highly esteemed and widely known citizens of 
Hoopeston, where he spent practically his entire life. He 
was born at El Paso, Woodford County, Illinois, October 
23, 1859, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Joy) Southwick. 

Joseph Southwick was born at Hoosac Falls, Rensselaer 
County, New York, and his wife was also a native of that 
section. He obtained his education at the Union Village 
high school, Washington County, New York. After finish- 
ing school he took up surveying. He surveyed and platted 



740 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

the counties of Kennebec and Androscoggin in Maine, as 
well as Lebanon and Dauphin counties in the State of 
Pennsylvania. In 1857 he went to Woodford County, Illi- 
nois, where he purchased a farm. In 1875 he removed to 
Vermilion County, where he purchased another farm, and 
where he lived until his death, October 18, 1894. His 
wife died June 10, 1895. Both are buried in Floral Hill 
Cemetery, Hoopeston. Their children were: Merritt An- 
drew, the subject of this sketch; Henry, who died Feb- 
ruary 13, 1929; and Arthur W., lives at Vandalia, Missouri. 

Merritt Andrew Southwick grew up at El Paso and 
Hoopeston, Illinois, and attended the public schools in the 
latter place. He was a graduate of Terre Haute (Indiana) 
Business School. Throughout his active career Mr. South- 
wick engaged in general farming and stock raising. He 
retired in 1902 and moved with his family to Hoopeston, 
where he lived until his death, May 26, 1911. Mr. South- 
wick is buried in Floral Hill Cemetery, Hoopeston. 

On October 27, 1887, Mr. Southwick was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Clara Eva Moore, of Loda, Illinois, the 
daughter of John and Clara Elizabeth (Marr) Moore, the 
former a native of Maryland and the latter of Indiana. 
Mr. Moore died September 26, 1885, and his wife died De- 
cember 29, 1923. The following children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Southwick: Lillie E., who is a librarian in the 
Hoopeston Public Library; Gilbert Merritt, resides in 
Hoopeston, Illinois; and Walter Moore, resides in Hoopes- 
ton, Illinois. 

Mr. Southwick was a life long Republican. He at- 
tended the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Southwick was a direct descendent of Lawrence 
and Cassandra Southwick, who came from England and 
settled at Salem, Massachusetts, in 1630. Jonathan South- 
wick was a minute man and fought at the battle of Lexing- 
ton, April 19, 1775. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 741 

Herbert J. Green is prominent in business circles in 
Hoopeston, where he is president of Green Brothers, Inc. 
He was born at Rotchford, Essex County, England, May 1, 
1883, the son of John and Hannah (Mann) Green. 

John Green was born in Essex County, England. He 
was a machinist by trade and after coming to the United 
States in 1891 he settled at Hoopeston, where he was 
employed for a short time by the American Can Company. 
Later he established a business of his own, but soon re- 
entered the employ of the American Can Company, then 
known as the Union Can Company. Mr. Green, however, 
soon established his own business again, and became one 
of the successful business men of the city. The establish- 
ment, known as Green Brothers, Inc., is now owned by 
his son, Herbert J. Green, the subject of this sketch. John 
Green, who lives retired at Hoopeston, is a Republican, 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, and Star Lodge, 
No. 709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. There are 
sixteen children in the Green family, as follows: Jennie, 
married Fred Swafford, lives at Springfield, Illinois; Nellie, 
married Grant Alexander, lives at Cleveland, Ohio; Alice, 
married Fred Parks, lives at Hoopeston; John, lives at 
Geneva, Illinois; Catherine, married Clarence Frantz, lives 
at Hoopeston; Mary, deceased; Herbert J., the subject of 
this sketch; George, deceased; Harry, lives at Jackson, 
Michigan; two children died in infancy; Millicent, mar- 
ried Alexander Murphy, lives at Hoopeston; Daisy, de- 
ceased; Glenn, a World War veteran, lives at Saint Peters- 
burg, Florida; Stanley, a World War veteran, served in 
France with the Eighty-sixth Division, lives at Port Wash- 
ington, Wisconsin; and Fred, a World War veteran, lives 
in Chicago, Illinois. 

Herbert J. Green received his education in the schools 
of Hoopeston. He then entered the employ of the Amer- 
ican Can Company as an apprentice machinist and later 
was connected with the company's plant in Chicago. He 



742 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

then went to Simco, Ontario, Canada, for the Dominion 
Canners Company, Limited, as production manager. Mr. 
Green's next business connection was as production man- 
ager for the Texas Oil Company at Port Arthur, Texas. 
Upon his return to Hoopeston in 1921 he became identified 
with his father's business and in 1928 purchased the inter- 
ests of his brother, at that time becoming president of the 
concern. The modern plant was built in 1926. 

In 1907 Mr. Green married Miss Grace McConnell, the 
daughter of William Rankin and Rosetta McConnell, the 
former a native of Ohio and the latter of Illinois. Both are 
deceased and are buried in Floral Hill Cemetery, Hoopes- 
ton. Mr. and Mrs. Green have two daughters, Winifred 
and Rosetta. 

Mr. Green is a member of the First Church of Christ; 
Star Lodge, No. 709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Lodge of Perfection, fourteenth degree; and Chamber of 
Commerce. He is identified with the Republican party in 
politics. 



Green Brothers, Inc. — A necessary adjunct to any city 
is a machine shop that is capable and ready to care for all 
kinds of machine repairs. Hoopeston is especially fortu- 
nate in that its needs are well taken care of by the Green 
Brothers Machine Shop, which in size and equipment is not 
excelled in Eastern Illinois. 

The business was originally established in 1909 by John 
Green and his two sons, in a small combination blacksmith 
and machine shop. In 1926 the business was incorporated 
as Green Brothers. The Greens knew their trade thor- 
oughly and the quality of work turned out was such that 
the business grew very rapidly. The need for larger quar- 
ters necessitated several moves until in 1925 the present 
new fire-proof, brick building on West Main Street was 
constructed. This is a large building of substantial and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 743 

pleasing appearance. Its equipment is fully modern and 
is all powered by electricity. The interior of the shop 
with its busy and progressive air compares only with sim- 
ilar shops in cities of forty thousand population or more. 
The equipment includes all standard and special machines 
necessary for contract manufacturing and machine job 
work of all kinds. The plant engages in manufacturing 
to a greater extent than is generally known. At present 
the more important lines manufactured are undertakers' 
embalming stretchers, grills and baskets and garage equip- 
ment. A large quantity of ornamental iron work for 
homes, lodges and clubs is manufactured of quite elaborate 
and pleasing designs, or one may have some special design 
made on order. Among recent installations of such work 
is the stair case and two beautiful lamps, which are a 
part of the new home recently constructed in Hoopeston 
by A. W. Murray. Besides lines of its own designs and 
manufacture this shop also contracts for such special man- 
ufacturing jobs as are wanted. 

The job department of the business makes a specialty 
of repairing automobile parts, boiler and engine work, 
although it is equipped to and does do all sorts of machin- 
ery rebuilding and repairs. The welding department does 
any and all kinds of acetylene welding and is equipped to 
handle any kind of metal that can be welded. This work 
is done by experienced, high-class workmen, who are spe- 
cialists in this line and who strive to always do dependable 
and satisfactory work. For special kinds of job work this 
shop has recently installed some of the best kind of special 
equipment for rebuilding and regrinding motor blocks, and 
regrinding pistons. It has special up-to-date tools and 
equipment for the rebabbiting of motor blocks and con- 
necting rods. In fact, no pains or expense have been 
spared to provide this shop with complete up-to-date ma- 
chinery, tools, and high-class personnel, which enables 
it to turn out first-class work that is fully guaranteed. 



744 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Besides local work this shop is constantly catering to peo- 
ple in need of its services within a radius of sixty miles of 
Hoopeston. 

Recently Mr. Herbert J. Green bought out his brother's 
interests, and he is now active manager of the shop. 
"Bert" Green, as he is popularly known, is first of all a 
thorough mechanic himself and can personally handle any 
sort of a job that is brought in. Besides this, he is a real 
executive and business man, and it is largely to his skilful 
coordination of men and machines that the business has 
built up its present reputation and growth. He is one of 
those individuals who, although he is usually very busy, 
always greets everyone with a smile. He displays the 
willingness to carefully estimate the smallest job in such 
a way that it is inevitable that he gain the good will of his 
customers. 

The business motto might well be: "No matter how 
small the job we will give you a full measure of satisfac- 
tion." 



Robert D. Kimberlin, owner of Kimberlin's Transfer 
Company, Hoopeston, is recognized as one of the substan- 
tial business men of Vermilion County. He was born at 
Hoopeston, October 29, 1886, the son of John H. and Mary 
(Fetters) Kimberlin. 

John H. Kimberlin was born in Pennsylvania. He came 
to Hoopeston in 1883 and in that year established the 
transfer and livery business, which is now conducted by 
his son. He died in 1903. Mr. Kimberlin was a Repub- 
lican, and a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He was also a member of the Hoopeston Fire Department. 
There were six children in the Kimberlin family, as fol- 
lows: William, lives at Monticcllo, Indiana; Frank, de- 
ceased; Robert D., the subject of this sketch; Fay, mar- 
ried Robert Peak, lives at Areola, Illinois; George, lives 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 745 

at Waukegan, Illinois, is a veteran of the World War, 
having served in France with Company B, One hundred 
Thirty-third Infantry, Thirty-third Division; and Grace, 
married Floyd Murphy, lives at Areola, Illinois. 

Robert D. Kimberlin has always lived at Hoopeston. 
He received his education in the public schools and in 1903 
took over his father's well established transfer business. 
In 1919 the building was converted into a garage and since 
that time motor trucks have been used exclusively by the 
company. They are specialists in local and long distance 
moving. The building also has a capacity for storing sixty 
automobiles. Mr. Kimberlin is local agent also for the 
Dodge and Plymouth automobiles and maintains a first 
class service station, in which five men are employed. 

In 1912 Mr. Kimberlin was married to Miss Nettie 
Whitaker, the daughter of James F. and Ida Whitaker, 
of Hoopeston. They have a son, Robert F. 

Mr. Kimberlin is a Republican, and is affiliated with 
Star Lodge No. 709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Rose Croix, sixteenth degree; Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica; and Chamber of Commerce. He served as chief of 
the Hoopeston Fire Department in 1926. 



John L. Guingrich, who is successfully engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business at Hoopeston, is a man 
of varied experiences and during his active career has been 
identified with a number of Illinois committees. He was 
born near East Lynn, Iroquois County, Illinois, January 4, 
1877. 

The early education of John L. Guingrich was obtained 
in the Carey school district, Iroquois County. At an early 
age he assumed a part of the responsibilities of his father's 
farm, his mother having been left a widow when Mr. 
Guingrich was a comparatively young man. When nine- 



746 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

teen years of age he went to Claytonville, Illinois, where 
he worked as an apprentice druggist. After four years 
he attended Grier College, Hoopeston, and completed the 
course in pharmacy at Scio College. The following year 
he was employed as a pharmacist in Elliott Brothers Drug 
Store, Hoopeston, and in 1900 became associated with Wil- 
liam P. Oberhauser, druggist, Peoria, Illinois. In 1904 
Mr. Guingrich was employed by John Kneer. He later 
went to Ottawa, Illinois, where he worked for T. E. Gapen 
& Sons, pharmacists, and in 1906 he was called to work at 
Alton, Illinois, in the drug store of Sam Wyss, where he 
remained for three years. Mr. Guingrich then purchased 
a drug business, which he conducted successfully for four 
years, also being engaged in the real estate business along 
with the drug business, until he removed to Cissna Park, 
Illinois. In 1910 he purchased a farm near Warsaw, Illi- 
nois, where he remained for two years. He then became 
interested in the insurance, loans and real estate business 
exclusively, and in 1912 became an active broker at Cissna 
Park, Illinois. In 1920 he located at Hoopeston, where he 
has met with marked success in his business undertaking. 
Mr. Guingrich has offices at 207% East Main Street. 

On March 27, 1910, Mr. Guingrich married Miss Rosa- 
line L. Herman, the daughter of John and Mary (Bahl- 
man) Herman. Mr. Herman, who died in December, 1927, 
was a native of Saint Johns, Indiana. He was a black- 
smith by trade and for twenty-two years owned and op- 
erated a shop, being an expert in the shoeing of race 
horses. He was a Democrat and held many township 
offices. His wife, born at Eagle Lake, Illinois, died in No- 
vember, 1926. Both are buried in Quaker Cemetery, 
Cissna Park, Illinois. They had three daughters: Tylla, 
married William Landes, lives at Cissna Park, Illinois; 
Lillie, married William Dryden, lives at Cissna Park, Illi- 
nois; and Rosaline L., wife of John L. Guingrich, of 
Hoopeston, Illinois. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 747 

Mrs. Guingrich is a graduate of Wellington (Illinois) 
Township High School and Illinois State Normal College. 
She was a teacher in the schools of Iroquois County for 
seventeen years and in 1926 was appointed principal of 
Cheneyville High School. She is the author of several 
English handbooks. 

Mr. Guingrich is chairman of the Code of Ethics Com- 
mittee in the Farm Lands Division of the National Asso- 
ciation of Real Estate Boards. He is vice president of the 
Illinois Association of Real Estate Boards, and past presi- 
dent of the Hoopeston Real Estate Board. He is also a 
member of the National Association of Real Estate Boards. 

Mr. Guingrich is independent in politics. He is a mem- 
ber of the Christian Science Church, and is affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias, Tribe of Ben Hur, Eagles Club, and 
Chamber of Commerce. 



John Guingrich, deceased, was a native of Ohio. He 
was born near Hamilton, August 24, 1832. He attended 
the district schools and at the age of sixteen years, in 
1849, he accompanied his father to California. He became 
a successful gold digger and remained on the Pacific Coast 
for eight years. He then returned to the East and settled 
in Tazewell County, Illinois, where he cleared land for 
farming. In 1870 he settled on a farm two and one-quarter 
miles northeast of East Lynn, where he lived until his 
death in September, 1882. He was a Whig early in life 
and later became a Republican. Mr. Guingrich was also a 
Mason. 

On May 7, 1867, Mr. Guingrich was united in marriage 
with Miss Susan Bahr, who was born near Bavaria, Ger- 
many, in 1844. To them were born ten children: Anna, 
married Henry C. Ziegenhorn, of Independence, Missouri; 
Joseph P., of Gridley, Illinois; Samuel, who died at the 



748 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

age of twenty-five years; Benjamin F., of Garrison, Iowa; 
Sadie, married August F. Ziegenhorn, of Claytonville, Illi- 
nois; Adena, died at the age of two years; John L., a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this history; Ada, married 
F. D. Frank, lives near Claytonville, Illinois; Emanuel, who 
died in 1918; and William, lives at Remington, Indiana. 

It is interesting to note that to John Guingrich belongs 
the credit for laying the first drain tile in that section of 
Illinois and proving the success of sub-drainage. In 1876 
while laying tile through a swamp on his farm Mr. Guin- 
grich came across some mammoth bones, which caused 
considerable comment over that section of the country. 
Upon investigation by a well known professor of zoology 
from Yale University the bones were discovered to be the 
skeleton of a mastodon. It was at that time one of the 
first to be found. 

Mr. Guingrich's father, Joseph Guingrich, was born in 
Alsace-Lorraine, France. He served in the regular French 
army during his youth and after coming to the United 
States engaged in farming in southwestern Ohio, near 
Hamilton, in Butler County. There he married a Miss 
Gerber, also a native of Alsace-Lorraine. She died in 1840. 
To this union were born the following children: John, 
Anna, Lena, Lydia, Barbara and Kate. Joseph Guingrich 
was a "forty-niner", who helped blaze the trail to Califor- 
nia during the gold rush. He left for the West early in 
the spring of 1849, taking with him his son, a boy of six- 
teen years, who was later the father of John L. Guingrich. 
They made the journey in a covered wagon, driving oxen 
and enduring all the hardships of that first emigrant pro- 
cession which started westward. He remained there for a 
period of four years, during which time he accumulated 
a fair amount of gold. He left his son there and returned 
to his home in Ohio for a time. In the spring of 1854 he 
was again seized with the "gold fever" and returned to 
California. Both father and son returned to Illinois in 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 749 

1857 and settled on a farm in Tazewell County. In 1860 
he was married to Mrs. Summers, nee Verkler, a native 
of New York. 



Glenn Howard Whitham. — A prominent figure in the 
business life of Rankin is Glenn Howard Whitham, who is 
president of the Rankin-Whitham State Bank. He was 
born at Rankin, October 11, 1882, the son of Eugene 
Howard and Elizabeth (George) Whitham. 

Eugene Howard Whitham's biography may be found 
elsewhere in this history. 

The education of Glenn Howard Whitham was received 
in the public schools of Rankin. Following his graduation 
from Rankin High School in 1899 he entered Michigan 
Military Academy and later was a student at Purdue Uni- 
versity. He also attended Metropolitan Business College, 
Chicago. Mr. Whitham began his business career In his 
father's bank at Rankin. He was also the manager of the 
Rankin Grain Company from 1902 until 1907, and from 
1907 until 1909 was located at Whitham, Missouri, as gen- 
eral superintendent of the land owned by the Rankin- 
Whitham Company. From 1909 until 1912 he was in 
charge of five hundred acres of land at Alva, Oklahoma, 
and in 1912 returned to Whitham, Missouri, where he 
became interested in a chain of grain elevators. Mr. 
Whitham remained there until 1919, at which time he 
removed to Mendon, Missouri. He sold his interests in 
1921 and located at Cleveland, Ohio, where he became asso- 
ciated with Earl D. Stearns in the organization of the 
Stearns Conveyor Company. This business was located 
at East 200th Street and St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. They 
were manufacturers of elevating and conveying machin- 
ery. Mr. Whitham served as secretary and treasurer of 
the business until October 1, 1926, when it was sold to the 
Chain Belt Company, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. On March 



750 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

1, 1927, Mr. Whitham became vice president of the Rankin- 
Whitham State Bank, at Rankin, and at the death of his 
father in April, 1928, was elected president. He is also a 
director of the Rankin Mutual Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation, and chairman of the executive committee of the 
Rankin Chamber of Commerce. 

On July 12, 1908, Mr. Whitham was united in marriage 
with Miss Minnie Silvers, the daughter of Edgar and Ade- 
laide (Dixon) Silvers, the former a native of Streator, 
Illinois, and the latter of England. He lives in Missouri. 
His wife died in 1907 and is buried at Streator, Illinois. 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitham have no children. 

Politically, Mr. Whitham is a Republican. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church and is numbered 
among the highly esteemed members of the community in 
which he lives. 



Eugene Howard Whitham. — The career of Eugene 
Howard Whitham was long identified with the business 
life of Rankin, where he was president of the Rankin- 
Whitham State Bank. He was born at Canal Fulton, Ohio, 
November 8, 1847, the son of Rev. John D. and Caroline 
(Farwell) Whitham. 

Rev. John D. Whitham was born near Wheeling, West 
Virginia, March 22, 1815. He studied in the common 
schools of Virginia and attended Washington College, now 
Washington and Jefferson College. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Princeton University, and 
began his career as a minister of the Presbyterian Church 
at Kean, Ohio. Later, he became a United Presbyterian 
minister. He had various charges in the East and in 1866 
settled at Paxton, Illinois, where he also owned a large 
farm. Reverend Whitham died January 14, 1897, and his 
wife, born in New Hampshire, August 13, 1816, died March 
18, 1899. Both are buried in Union Cemetery, Rankin. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 751 

There were five children born to Reverend and Mrs. 
Whitham: Eugene Howard, the subject of this sketch; 
Rosetta, born May 7, 1849, deceased ; Robert Farwell, born 
April 13, 1852, lives at Richmond Highlands, Washington; 
George Lewis, born October 23, 1853, deceased; and 
Charles Sumner, born May 18, 1856, died in 1927. 

Reverend Whitham was the son of Joseph Rider and 
Sarah (Dement) Whitham. He was born January 15, 
1779, and died in 1841. His wife, born November 30, 1778, 
died June 28, 1842. Both were natives of West Virginia. 

Eugene Howard Whitham received his early education 
in the district schools. He came to Paxton, Illinois, with 
his parents in 1866 and later attended Illinois State Nor- 
mal College. After teaching school for several years he 
came to Rankin in 1873 and managed the D. & W. A. 
Rankin Grain Elevator. On May 15, 1875, in partnership 
with W. A. Rankin and David Rankin, he organized the 
Rankin- Whitham & Company Bank. Mr. Whitham be- 
came cashier of the institution. On March 1, 1919, the 
bank was incorporated and the name changed to the 
Rankin- Whitham State Bank. At that time Mr. Whitham 
was elected president and was holding that office at the 
time of his death, April 25, 1928. He is buried in Union 
Cemetery, Rankin. Mr. Whitham served for thirty-five 
years as secretary of the Rankin Building, Loan and Sav- 
ings Association and was active in the Rankin Business 
Men's Association. The town of Whitham, Missouri, is 
named in honor of Mr. Whitham, who owned large tracts 
of land in that section of Missouri. 

On January 1, 1879, Mr. Whitham was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Elizabeth George, the daughter of Robert 
and Jane (Guthrie) George. He was born at Cannons- 
burg, Pennsylvania, in 1814 and died in 1897. His wife 
was born in 1812 and died in 1911. Both are buried in 
Union Cemetery, Rankin. Mrs. Whitham was born near 
New Concord, Ohio, November 26, 1847, and died June 14, 



752 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

1924. She is buried with her husband in Union Cemetery. 
To Eugene Howard and Elizabeth (George) Whitham 
were born two children : Glenn Howard, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this history; and Gladys, married 
Earl Downing Stearns, lives at Marion, Ohio. 

Mr. Whitham was always a Republican. He served as 
a member of the local school board and city council. He 
held membership in the Presbyterian Church and through- 
out his life was active in church work. 



Chester A. Aldrich, publisher of the Chronicle-Herald 
of Hoopeston, went to work in a newspaper and printing 
plant when a boy and his experience has made him one of 
the ablest newspaper publishers in Illinois. Mr. Aldrich 
was born at Wapella, Illinois, October 5, 1874. His grand- 
father, David Aldrich, was of English ancestry, the Aid- 
rich family having been established in Rhode Island in the 
latter part of the seventeenth century. 

David Aldrich was a native of Pennsylvania and spent 
most of his life in northern Ohio and northern Indiana. He 
died at Mishawaka, Ind. His son, David Aldrich, father 
of Chester A., was born at Mishawaka, Indiana, in 1844, 
became a farmer at Wapella, 111., where he married and 
served as a soldier in the Union Army during the Civil 
War. From Wapella he removed to DuQuoin, Illinois, 
where he became a prosperous farmer and where he lived 
for thirty-five years. He died in December, 1928, and is 
buried at Cobden, Illinois. He was a Republican, a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church, and a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. While in service during the Civil 
War he served as a member of the One Hundred and Fifty- 
seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry and was wounded in 
service. David Aldrich married Ann Eliza Burroughs, 
who was born at New Paris, Indiana, and died at Wapella, 




CHESTER A. ALDR1CH 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 753 

Illinois, in 1877. Her father, Chester S. Burroughs, was 
a native of Northampton, Massachusetts, went to Indiana 
at an early day, served as a soldier in the Mexican War, 
and followed the occupation of carpenter and builder. He 
married Permelia Mills, a native of Ohio, who died at 
Niles, Michigan. The Mills family came from England 
and were among the early colonists of Virginia, being re- 
lated to the Custis family, of which Martha Custis Wash- 
ington was a member. Chester S. Burroughs was a cousin 
of the Chicago merchant, Marshall Field. 

Chester A. Aldrich was the youngest of three children, 
the oldest, Nathaniel, dying in infancy. His sister, Amy 
Permelia, is the wife of Fred Jansen, a cigar manufacturer 
at Denver, Colorado. Chester A. Aldrich was only three 
years old when his mother died, and he grew up in the 
home of his grandparents at Niles, Michigan, attending the 
public schools there until he was sixteen years of age. He 
then served a nine month apprenticeship in the office of the 
Niles (Michigan) Democrat, and for eleven months was 
a reporter for the Niles Daily Star. He had three months 
experience as a reporter for the Detroit Evening News, 
and then returned to Niles, where for one year he was city 
editor of the Niles Daily Star, following which he became 
associated with Major L. A. Duncan as editor of the Niles 
Daily Sun and Niles Republican. After four years he 
went to Poplar Bluffs, Missouri, and established the Poplar 
Bluffs Sentinel, which he published two years, selling that 
paper in 1900. Then for another year Mr. Aldrich was 
city editor of the Niles Daily Sun, and for a year was city 
editor of the Mattoon (Illinois) Morning Star. He then 
became managing editor and publisher of this Mattoon 
paper and remained in that city until 1911. 

In 1911 Mr. Aldrich acquired the Hoopeston Evening 
Herald. On April 15, 1921, he bought the Republican 
Daily and Weekly Chronicle, the consolidation of the two 
papers resulting in the Chronicle-Herald, an evening daily. 

14— Vol. 2 



754 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

The Chronicle is the oldest newspaper of Hoopeston, having 
been established in 1872 by Mr. Dale Wallace, still a resi- 
dent of this city. The Chronicle-Herald is independent in 
politics. The paper is now owned and published by the 
Aldrich Printing & Publishing Company, Incorporated, 
which Mr. Aldrich incorporated in 1921 with a capital of 
$40,000. He is president and managing editor and general 
business manager of the corporation. The plant and offices 
are located at 201 East Main Street. This is a very suc- 
cessful newspaper and few cities of the size of Hoopeston 
can claim a newspaper so well edited and possessing more 
of the qualities of a really good newspaper. 

Mr. Aldrich is a member of the Illinois Press Associa- 
tion, National Editorial Association, and is vice president 
of the Hoopeston Chamber of Commerce. He also belongs 
to the Commercial Club, Hubbard Trail Country Club, and 
Lions Club. He is independent in his political views. 

Mr. Aldrich is a member of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. He owns an attractive home at 626 East 
Washington Street and has other valuable real estate hold- 
ings in Hoopeston. 

On July 16, 1897, Mr. Aldrich was united in marriage 
with Miss Hattie Hudson, who was born at Rockton, Illi- 
nois, in 1878. She died in a Chicago hospital in 1904. By 
this marriage there were four children : Rita Amy, wife of 
Clarence W. Murray, of the A. W. Murray Plumbing Com- 
pany, Hoopeston; Erma Anna, wife of J. Franklin 
Murphy, who is a pressman in the Chronicle-Herald plant; 
David R., linotype operator for his father; and Lucretia E., 
wife of Marvin G. Probst, a resident of River Forest, 111. 
He is a member of the firm of Graham, Anderson, Probst 
& White, Chicago, architects, who have designed and built 
some of the finest business and public structures in Chi- 
cago and the middle west. 

On October 1, 1906, Mr. Aldrich was married at Clay- 
ton, Missouri, to Miss Georgia Jane Gibler, a native of 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 755 

Mattoon, Illinois. By this marriage there are two chil- 
dren: Helen Czarine; and Richard Wayne. 



The Rankin- Whitham State Bank. — Numbered among 
the dependable banking institutions of Vermilion County 
may be mentioned the Rankin- Whitham State Bank, of 
Rankin. It was organized as a private bank, May 5, 1875, 
by W. A. Rankin, David Rankin, and Eugene H. Whitham. 
The original capital stock was increased from $10,000 to 
$15,000. 

On April 25, 1885, B. H. Durham purchased the interest 
of D. Rankin, and in 1878 W. H. Clark was taken in as a 
partner. The bank was reorganized on September 9, 1885, 
by W. A. Rankin, E. H. Whitham, and B. H. Durham, with 
a capital stock of $35,000, under the firm of Rankin- 
Whitham & Company. Mr. Whitham was directly respon- 
sible for the growth and success of the institution. 

On April 1, 1919, the bank was incorporated under the 
laws of the State of Illinois. The officers elected were: 
E. H. Whitham, president; W. D. Rankin, vice president; 
and W. M. Cutler, cashier. Directors were: E. H. 
Whitham, W. D. Rankin, W. M. Cutler, John C. Speck, and 
P. Henneberry. 

The statement as of April 1, 1919, was as follows: 
Loans and Discounts, $156,325.22; Overdrafts, $3,787.40; 
Bank House and Fixtures, $11,474.00; Stocks and Bonds, 
$65,181.53; Current Expenses, $418.53; Cash and Specie, 
$7,442.20; Due from Banks, $258,094.37. Total, $502,723.25. 
Liabilities: Capital Stock, $100,000.00; Certificates of De- 
posit, $79,742.60; Deposits, $322,980.65; Total, $502,723.25. 

The statement as of April 5, 1929, was as follows: Re- 
sources: Due from Banks, $33,737.07; Banking House and 
Fixtures, $19,250.00; Overdrafts, $831.40; Loans and Dis- 
counts, $244,378.87; Stocks and Bonds, $32,462.50; Other 



756 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Real Estate, $4,197.06. Total, $334,856.90. Liabilities: 
Capital Stock, $50,000; Surplus, $10,000; Undivided Profits, 
$3,480.00; Certificate of Deposit, $100,462.77; Deposits, 
$170,913.34. Total, $334,856.90. 

On November 1, 1927, the stockholders and directors 
voted to reduce the capital stock from $100,000 to $50,000. 
The present officers of the Rankin- Whitham State Bank 
are: Glenn H. Whitham, president; Kuno Seidel, vice 
president; W. M. Cutler, cashier; and John C. Speck, 
assistant cashier. The directors are: G. H. Whitham, 
Kuno Seidel, W. M. Cutler, John C. Speck, M. S. Whitham. 



Lauren Davis. — Perhaps one of the best known of the 
younger automobile men of Vermilion County is Lauren 
Davis, who has the agency for the Hudson and Essex auto- 
mobiles at Rankin. He was born south of Boswell, Warren 
County, Indiana, January 12, 1894, the son of Joseph H. 
and Frances (Myers) Davis. 

Joseph H. Davis was born at Boswell, Indiana, in 1865. 
When a young man he became interested in the grocery 
business at Boswell, and was thus engaged until 1903, at 
which time he sold his interests and removed to Rankin, 
where he purchased the Four-C Telephone Company. This 
business included exchanges at East Lynn, Illinois, Cissna 
Park, Illinois, and Rankin. In 1910 he purchased the 
Potomac, Armstrong, and Collison exchanges and served 
as president of the Four-C Telephone Company. Mr. Davis 
retired from business in 1914 and died April 30, 1916. He 
is buried at Boswell, Indiana. His widow, born at Attica, 
Indiana, resides at Rankin. Mr. Davis was a Republican 
and held numerous public offices. He held membership 
in the Rankin Lodge No. 725, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Modern Woodmen of America, and Woodmen of 
the World. To Mr. and Mrs. Davis were born four chil- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 757 

dren : Opal, died in 1928, married Joseph Ryden, who lives 
at Medaryville, Illinois ; Ida, married E. M. Grunsted, lives 
in Chicago; Earl, merchant, Rankin, married Bess Sloan, 
and they have two children, Earlene and Bobby; and 
Lauren, the subject of this sketch. 

Lauren Davis attended the public schools of Boswell, 
Indiana, and Rankin. Following his graduation from high 
school he became interested in the telephone business with 
his father. From 1914 until 1927 he served as a rural mail 
carrier and during that time was also interested in the 
automobile business. He became agent for the Ford auto- 
mobile at Rankin in 1918 and continued until 1924, at 
which time he took over the Hudson-Essex agency. The 
new garage and service station was built by Mr. Davis in 
1929. It has storage space for fifty-five cars. In 1928 
Mr. Davis also established an agency at Hoopeston and 
later in that year opened branch agencies at Rossville and 
Potomac. 

In 1914 Mr. Davis married Miss Grace Sloan, the daugh- 
ter of George and Marietta (France) Sloan. Mr. Sloan 
lives retired at Rankin. His wife is deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis have two children: Lauren Dale, born in 
1918; and Martha Maxine, born in 1920. 

Mr. Davis is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a 
Republican in politics. 



Charles R. Hill. — A substantial citizen and dependable 
business man of Rankin is found in Charles R. Hill, who 
is editor and owner of the "Rankin Independent." He was 
born at Montgomery, Alabama, February 23, 1877, the son 
of John William Sterling and Mary (Beyer) Hill. 

John William Sterling Hill was born in New York, May 
8, 1856. He came west with his parents early in life and 



758 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

settled in Stark County, Illinois, where he was reared and 
educated. Subsequently, Mr. Hill went with the Gould 
Bridge Company and worked for that firm during the 
building of bridges across the Ohio River, which connected 
Henderson, Kentucky, and Evansville, Indiana, for the 
Louisville & Nashville Railroad. Later, he was foreman 
on the building of the bridge across the Mississippi River 
at Keithsburg, Illinois. Mr. Hill finally located at Paxton, 
Illinois, where he established a business of his own as pro- 
prietor of a carriage and wagon works. He died in 1912 
and his wife, also a native of New York, died in 1928. 
They are buried at Paxton and Rankin, respectively. Mr. 
Hill was a Democrat, a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, Modern Woodmen of America, and Court of 
Honor. Mr. and Mrs. Hill had only one child, Charles R., 
the subject of this sketch. 

Charles R. Hill received his education in the schools of 
Paducah, Kentucky, and following his graduation from 
Paducah High School in 1897 he came to Rankin, where 
he was employed as a clerk in a local hardware store. In 
April, 1912, he purchased the "Rankin Independent," a 
weekly newspaper, which he has published continuously 
since that date. Mr. Hill learned the printer's trade after 
the purchase of his newspaper. He handles the entire 
procedure from editing the paper to its publication. Mr. 
Hill is also vice president and director of the Rankin Build- 
ing & Loan Association. 

In 1904 Mr. Hill married Miss Lillian Irene Sloan; 
daughter of James and Matilda (Simson) Sloan, natives 
of Londonderry, Ireland, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hill have a son, Charles Dean, born in August, 1905. He 
is associated with his father's newspaper business. 

Mr. Hill is an independent voter in politics and has 
served as town clerk for the past twenty years. He was 
also treasurer for a period of four years and village clerk 
for one term. He has been a member of the Rankin School 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 759 

Board for twelve years and served as secretary for eight 
years. Mr. Hill is an active member of the Methodist 
Church and is affiliated with Rankin Lodge No. 725, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Past Master, 1929; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Mohammed 
Shrine, Peoria, Illinois ; and Modern Woodmen of America. 



Patrick Henneberry, general merchant, ranks high 
among the dependable business men of Rankin. He was 
born in LaSalle County, Illinois, June 1, 1866, the son of 
Dennis and Julia (Tierney) Henneberry. 

Dennis Henneberry was a native of Ireland, as was 
also his wife. He came to this country when a young man 
and after a short residence in New York came to Illinois 
and settled in LaSalle County, where he became interested 
in the coal business. He was a young man at the time of 
his death in 1867. His wife died in 1897. They were mem- 
bers of the Catholic Church. To Mr. and Mrs. Henneberry 
were born the following children: Elizabeth, who died in 
1926, was the wife of J. B. Johnson, of Joliet, Illinois; Julia, 
married William Burden, lives in Iroquois County, Illinois; 
Mary Ellen, the widow of William Haywood, lives at Joliet, 
Illinois; John, born in 1864, died in 1876; and Patrick, the 
subject of this sketch. 

Patrick Henneberry was educated in the district 
schools of Iroquois County, Illinois, and also attended 
school at Rankin. His first employment was on the farm 
of William A. Rankin, founder of the city which bears 
his name. Later, Mr. Henneberry operated his mother's 
farm until her death, when he purchased the place. He 
continued farming until 1901, at which time he removed 
to Rankin, where he purchased an interest in the general 
store of Morrow & McCauley, buying out Mr. McCauley's 
interests in the business. The firm name became known 



760 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

as Henneberry & Morrow. In 1917 Mr. Henneberry pur- 
chased Mr. Morrow's interests and became sole owner of 
the store. He was one of the directors of the Rankin- 
Whitham State Bank at the time of its incorporation, but 
resigned from the office in 1927. 

In 1891 Mr. Henneberry was united in marriage with 
Miss Marcella Kelly, the daughter of James and Catherine 
(Gaughen) Kelly, natives of Ireland, both now deceased. 
They had three children: Marcella, deceased; Catherine 
Julia, in religious life known as Sister M. Marcella, St. 
Thomas Academy, Chicago, Illinois; and James Leo, 
mechanical engineer for the Carbondale Machine Com- 
pany. He is a graduate of the University of Illinois and 
during the World War served with the Aviation Section, 
United States Army. He married Nellie Ruddy, and they 
have three children, James Patrick, Mark Allen, and 
Geraldine. 

Mr. Henneberry has always been a Democrat. He 
served as school director for several terms and as president 
of the Village Board for ten years. He is a member of 
St. Anthony's Catholic Church, and belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America, Chamber of Commerce, and Rankin 
Business Men's Association. He has a wide acquaintance 
in the community and is highly esteemed by all who know 
him. 



Everett J. Smith, popular postmaster and business man 
of Armstrong, is a native of Vermilion County. He was 
born five miles south of Armstrong, September 6, 1883, the 
son of John E. and Mary Ellen (Firebaugh) Smith. 

John E. Smith was born north of Danville, Illinois, in 
1852, the son of George G. and Elizabeth (Fairchilds) 
Smith, natives of Pennsylvania and Illinois, respectively. 
He was a farmer and held numerous township offices. 
Both he and his wife are buried at Potomac, Illinois. Their 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 761 

son, John E., was educated in the district schools and 
attended Illinois Normal College. He was a teacher in 
the district schools of Vermilion County for thirteen years 
and also owned and operated a farm of two hundred and 
eighty acres. He was a Democrat, a member of the Chris- 
tian Church, and Masonic Lodge. Mr. Smith died Novem- 
ber 6, 1896, and is buried at Potomac, Illinois. His widow, 
born at Attica, Indiana, lives at Champaign, Illinois. Their 
children were: Irvin, professor of mathematics in the 
Department of Agriculture, University of North Dakota; 
Edwin R., professor of mathematics at Iowa State Col- 
lege, Ames, Iowa; Alfred G., farmer, lives at Columbia, 
South Carolina; Everett J., the subject of this sketch; and 
Leslie, city manager, Atlas Cement Company, New York 
City. 

Everett J. Smith obtained his education in the district 
schools of Pilot Township, Vermilion County. He re- 
mained on his father's farm until he was twenty-eight 
years of age, and in January, 1911, removed to Armstrong, 
where he purchased the Armstrong Lumber Company. 
This was completely destroyed by fire in 1925 and Mr. 
Smith later purchased the A. G. Maury Hardware Store 
at Armstrong, which he now conducts. In 1914 he was 
appointed postmaster during the administration of Presi- 
dent Wilson. He has continued in office to the present 
time. 

In 1905 Mr. Smith was united in marriage with Miss 
Ethel Collison, the daughter of Jesse and Loretta (Har- 
rison) Collison. The former is deceased and the latter 
lives at Armstrong. Both were natives of England. Mrs. 
Smith died in November, 1918, and is buried at Armstrong. 
To this union were born three daughters: Mary, lives in 
Chicago; Helen and Margaret, both at home. In 1926 Mr. 
Smith married Miss Inez McArthur, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Douglas McArthur. 



762 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

In politics Mr. Smith is independent. He is a member 
of the Christian Church and has the following lodge affilia- 
tions: Potomac Lodge, No. 782, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, Past Master, 1926; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple, Springfield, Illinois; 
and Gao Grotto, Danville. 



Harley O'Neal is well and favorably known at Rankin, 
where he is a plumbing and heating contractor. He was 
born near LeRoy, in McLean County, Illinois, September 
6, 1885, the son of Eleasor C. and Rebecca (Reese) O'Neal. 

Eleasor C. O'Neal was born in Warren County, Ohio, 
in 1850, the son of Eleasor O'Neal, a native of Ohio, who 
came west with his family about 1855 and settled near 
Bloomington, Illinois. Eleasor C. O'Neal became a farmer. 
He retired in 1922 and has since resided at Bloomington, 
Illinois. He is a Democrat and a member of the United 
Brethren Church. Rebecca (Reese) O'Neal was born in 
Illinois and died in 1903. She is buried at Saybrook, Illi- 
nois. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. O'Neal: 
Mamie, married Frank Hall, lives at Bloomington, Illinois; 
Harley, the subject of this sketch; and a daughter died at 
the age of three years. 

Harley O'Neal spent his boyhood at Saybrook, Illinois, 
and attended the public schools. He came to Rankin in 
1905 and spent the next two years as manager of the farm 
of Henry S. France. He then went with the Lake Erie & 
Western Railroad as a fireman. Mr. O'Neal learned the 
plumbing and tinning trade in Brickey's Hardware Store, 
Rankin, and in May, 1926, purchased the shop from Mr. 
Brickey. He has the agency for the Lennox Furnace, 
Premier DeLuxe Furnace and also represents the Koons 
Furnace Company. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 763 

In 1905 Mr. O'Neal married Miss Bertha France, the 
daughter of Henry S. and Martha France, both deceased. 
They were natives of Ohio and early settlers of LaSalle 
County, Illinois. Mrs. O'Neal died June 20, 1907, and is 
buried at Rankin. Her son, Vernon, was born June 3, 
1907. He married Miss Mona Engebrecht, and is pro- 
prietor of a garage at Potomac, Illinois. In 1915 Mr. 
O'Neal was married the second time to Miss Myria Norris, 
the daughter of Samuel and Lucy Norris, natives of 
Indiana. He is deceased and his widow lives at Rankin. 
To Harley and Myria (Norris) O'Neal the following chil- 
dren have been born: Glenn, Frances, Ernest, Ethel, 
Velma, Earl, and Doris, all at home. 

Mr. O'Neal is independent in politics. He has served 
as a member of the school board and was the first chief of 
the local fire department. 



John Frederick, one of the proprietors of the "Square 
Deal Garage," is numbered among the progressive and 
enterprising young business men of Rankin. He was born 
on a farm in Iroquois County, Illinois, February 8, 1903, 
the son of John and Emma (Strauss) Frederick. 

John Frederick, deceased, was a native of Germany. 
He was three years old when his parents brought him to 
this country. They settled at Peoria, Illinois, and in later 
life Mr. Frederick became interested in farming. He 
entered the employ of the Nickel Plate Railroad and was 
employed by that company at Rankin at the time of his 
death in 1926. His widow, born in Berlin, Germany, 
resides at Rankin. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick were the 
parents of the following children: Elizabeth, married 
Lawrence Fitzgerald, lives at Rankin; Arthur, a World 
War veteran, lives in Chicago; Samuel, a World War vet- 
eran, deceased; Edward, lives at Rankin; Sophia, married 



764 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Franklin Lutz, lives at Rankin; John F., and Benjamin, 
live at Rankin; Harry, lives in Chicago; Cora and Rosella, 
both at home. 

The boyhood of John Frederick was spent at Rankin. 
He attended the public schools and following his gradua- 
tion from Rankin High School engaged in farming for six 
years. He then went to Hoopeston with the Vermilion 
Malleable Iron Company and in 1925 took charge of the 
bulk station of the Standard Oil Company at Rankin. He 
has been interested in the garage business since 1927 and 
in 1929 became associated with Honas Grecht. They are 
expert mechanics and operate one of the best equipped 
garages and service stations in this section of Vermilion 
County. Their modern garage has a capacity of fifty 
cars. 

In 1928 Mr. Frederick was united in marriage with 
Miss Helen Seidel, the daughter of Gustave and Bertha 
Seidel, the former a native of Germany and the latter of 
Illinois. 

Politically, Mr. Frederick is a Republican. He is a 
member of the Lutheran Church and belongs to the Rankin 
Business Men's Association. 



Harvey V. Andrews, of Andrews & Williams, general 
merchants, has been a leading business man of Armstrong 
for many years. He was born at Danville, Illinois, March 
31, 1869, the son of John H. and Laura (Earls) Andrews. 

John H. Andrews, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil 
War. He was born in London, England, and came to 
Canada with his father, who was a member of Her 
Majesty's "Cold Stream Guards." The family located near 
Goose Island, Canada, where the father served as an officer 
in the English Army. Later, John H. Andrews came to 
New York, where he spent several years. He then came 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 765 

to Vermilion County and settled at Rossville. He joined 
the Seventieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and later served 
with an Indiana outfit of light artillery. He was wounded 
at the battle of Richmond, Kentucky, and taken prisoner 
at Hattlet Inlet. He served for eight months in Libby 
prison, and later escaped to join his regiment. He was 
honorably discharged from the service in 1865. Mr. 
Andrews then came to Danville, where he was married to 
Laura Earls, a native of that city. Six children were born 
to them, as follows: Frank, deceased; William H., lives 
at Hoopeston; Anna, married Sherman Williams, lives at 
Danville; Harvey V., the subject of this sketch; W. A., 
deceased; and Virginia, married Frank Crocker, lives at 
Meade, Kansas. Mr. Andrews was a Republican, a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He died in 1879 and his wife died 
in 1877. Both are buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. 
The education of Harvey V. Andrews was received in 
the public schools of Danville. He was a boy of ten years 
when he was left an orphan. For a time he lived with 
C. J. McGee and later with N. A. Kimball. Subsequently 
he went to Oakwood, Illinois, where he was employed on 
a farm by Nelson Liggett. At the age of twenty-one years 
Mr. Andrews attended Brown's Business College, at Val- 
paraiso, Indiana. He began his business career with the 
Glenburn Coal Company and later was bookkeeper for the 
St. Charles Coal Company, St. Charles, Illinois. He then 
came to Armstrong and was employed as a clerk by Mr. 
Brown for a time, after which he went with R. G. Risser, 
of Kankakee, Illinois, as manager of his store at Arm- 
strong. After a number of years Mr. Andrews became 
interested in the general mercantile business as a member 
of the firm of Mills, Andrews & Goodwine. The firm later 
became Andrews & Cook and finally Andrews & Williams. 
They are leading merchants of this section and have an 
excellent trade. 



766 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

In 1905 Mr. Andrews married Miss Louise James, of 
Rochester, Indiana. They have no children. 

Mr. Andrews has always been a Republican. He is an 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
belongs to the Masonic Lodge and Modern Woodmen of 
America. 



Arthur S. Bass is recognized as one of the substantial 
business men of Armstrong, where he is president of the 
Farmers State Bank. He was born in Middleport Town- 
ship, Vermilion County, October 17, 1866, the son of Henry 
and Harriet (Bennett) Bass. 

Henry Bass was born in England. He learned the 
draper's trade from his father, Thomas Bass, a dry goods 
merchant. In 1851 Henry Bass came to the United States 
and settled in Vermilion County, near Potomac. He 
engaged in general farming and also conducted the first 
general store at Potomac. In 1879 he removed to another 
farm of two hundred and thirty acres southeast of Arm- 
strong, where he remained until about 1906. He then 
retired and came to Armstrong, where he died in 1909. 
Mr. Bass was a Republican and a member of the Methodist 
Church. His wife, also born in England, died in 1899. 
Both are buried at Potomac. To Mr. and Mrs. Bass seven 
children were born, as follows: Mary, the widow of W. 
F. Burd, lives at Danville; Fannie, the widow of Samuel 
Gilbert, lives at Urbana, Illinois; Thomas, Samuel, and 
Harriet, all deceased; Fred, farmer, lives at Pleasant Hill, 
Illinois; and Arthur S., the subject of this sketch. 

Arthur S. Bass has always lived in Vermilion County. 
He attended the district schools and was interested in 
farming at an early age. For a time he farmed on his 
father's land and later became the owner of one thousand 
two hundred and fifty acres in Vermilion County, which 
he owns at the present time. He has also owned large 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 767 

^tracts of land in the West. Mr. Bass has been identified 
with banking interests since 1902, at which time he and 
his brother, Fred Bass, purchased the Goodwin Bank, of 
Armstrong. It was thereafter known as Bass Brothers 
Bank until its incorporation in 1904 as the Farmers State 
Bank. Arthur S. Bass then became vice president. Three 
years later he purchased his brother's interests and became 
president of the institution. 

In 1889 Mr. Bass married Miss Jennie Earl, the daugh- 
ter of Elijah and Salome (Crouse) Earl, natives of 
Indiana, both now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Bass were 
born four children: Florence, deceased; Earl, farmer, 
lives in Vermilion County, married Pearl Duncan, and 
they have three children, Mildred, Margaret, and Robert; 
Fred, vice president of the Commercial Savings & Trust 
Company, Danville; and Irene, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, was a teacher at Vackaville, California, 
High school. On June 6, 1929, she married Lewis G. Mar- 
telle, and they now reside in Vackaville, California. 

Mr. Bass is a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, and belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



The Farmers State Bank, of Armstrong, is numbered 
among the dependable and well known banking institu- 
tions of Vermilion County. It was organized as a private 
bank in 1895 by J. P. Fraut, and was originally known as 
the Bank of Armstrong. 

John W. Goodwine became the owner of the Bank of 
Armstrong after several years and the name was changed 
to the Goodwine Bank of Armstrong. In 1902 Arthur S. 
Bass, in partnership with his brother, Fred Bass, became 
owners of the bank and it then became known as Bass 
Brothers Bank. In 1904 it was incorporated under the 
laws of the State of Illinois as the Farmers State Bank, 



768 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

with a capital stock of $25,000. The first new officers were : 
Fred Bass, president; A. D. Bass, vice president; and John 
Anderson, cashier. The directors were: Fred Bass, A. S. 
Bass, John Anderson, Guy C. Howard, A. C. Maury, D. M. 
Lane, and Staunton Foster. 

In 1907 A. S. Bass purchased the interests of his brother 
in the bank and at that time was elected president, in 
which capacity he now serves. Dale Goodwine became 
cashier at that time. 

The present officers (1929) of the Farmers State Bank, 
of Armstrong, are: Arthur S. Bass, president; Staunton 
Foster, vice president; and Dale Goodwine, cashier. The 
directors are: A. S. Bass, S. Foster, A. Gilbert, D. M. 
Lane, and Earl Bass. 

The Farmers State Bank has a capital stock of $25,000 
and a surplus of $25,000. 



Morgan Bradford Grimes, familiarly known as "Col. M. 
B. Grimes," has been a resident of Vermilion County for 
twenty years, having moved here from the State of 
Indiana. 

Colonel Grimes has been active in farming and auction- 
eering, and is widely known as an expert horse salesman. 
He sold for the leading markets at sale barns in Indianap- 
olis, Terre Haute, St. Louis, Chicago, and Danville. 

In an official capacity, Colonel Grimes served as deputy 
United States marshall, as a member of the police force of 
Danville, and as deputy sheriff of Vermilion County. He 
was elected sheriff of the county on November 6, 1926, 
with the largest majority of any sheriff of Vermilion 
County. The slogan given him before his election was: "A 
real man for a real job." 

As sheriff of Vermilion County, Colonel Grimes asks 
the cooperation of the citizens of the county for law en- 
forcement. 




MORGAN BRADFORD GRIMES 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 769 

Sidney B. Cutright. — Prominent in business and finan- 
cial circles in Hoopeston, where he is secretary of the 
Illinois Canning Company, Sidney B. Cutright was born 
at Peoria, Illinois, September 29, 1882, the son of James 
M. and Emma S. (Heckard) Cutright. 

James M. Cutright, deceased, was a leading attorney 
of Peoria for many years. He was born at Chillicothe, 
Illinois, and was a graduate of Lombard College. He 
became master of the chancery of Peoria County, and 
served in that office for a number of years. Mr. Cutright 
was a Democrat; a member of Illinois Lodge, No. 263, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Past Master; Royal 
Arch Chapter; Peoria Commandery, No. 3, Knights Tem- 
plar, Past Captain General; Mohammed Shrine; Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks ; and Knights of Pythias. 
He was identified with the Peoria County Bar Associa- 
tion, Illinois Bar Association, and American Bar Associa- 
tion. Mr. Cutright died in 1904 and is buried at Peoria, 
Illinois. His widow, born at Atlanta, Illinois, lives at 
Peoria. To Mr. and Mrs. Cutright were born three chil- 
dren: Lois Ida, teacher, West Technical High School, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Sidney B., the subject of this sketch; and 
Florence, teacher, Peoria High School, Peoria. 

Following his graduation from the public schools of 
Peoria, Sidney B. Cutright attended Bradley Academy and 
in 1903 was graduated from Bradley Polytechnic Institute. 
He began his business career with his uncle, N. S. Cut- 
right, lumber dealer, Peoria, Illinois, and Rhinelander, 
Wisconsin. He was later associated with the Louisiana 
Lumber Company, of Rochelle, Louisiana, and after his 
return to Peoria assumed charge of the Cutright & Rus- 
sell Lumber Company until 1911. He then came to Hoopes- 
ton and became identified with the Illinois Canning Com- 
pany through his uncle, N. S. Cutright, at that time vice 
president of the company. Sidney B. Cutright later 
became vice president and when the business was reor- 

15— Vol. 2 



770 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ganized he became a member of the executive committee. 
He has served as secretary of the company since 1928. He 
is also trustee of the Outright estate. 

In 1911 Mr. Outright was united in marriage with Miss 
Beatrice Jenkins, the daughter of Frank L. and Adele 
Jenkins, natives of Peoria. Mr. Jenkins, formerly asso- 
ciated with Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Company, of 
Chicago, now lives retired at Spring Valley, Illinois. His 
wife is deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Outright have been 
born four children: Mary Stuart, Sidney B., Jr., Beatrice 
Joanne, and Frances Shirley. 

Mr. Outright is a Democrat, a member of the Univer- 
salist Church, and has the following lodge and club affilia- 
tions: Star Lodge No. 709, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Hoopeston Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 181; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Modern Wood- 
men of America; Hubbard Trail Country Club; and Com- 
mercial Club. 



The Illinois Canning Company. — The first business 
enterprise of any magnitude to be established in Hoopes- 
ton was the canning plant by S. S. McCall in the year 1875, 
two years before Hoopeston was incorporated as a city. 
From a primitive venture this factory has been brought 
to one of the greatest concerns of its kind in the country, 
today canning approximately twenty million cans of beans 
and corn annually. 

Stephen S. McCall was a New York man who came 
west on a prospecting trip for a site on which to locate a 
canning factory. Arriving in Hoopeston he became much 
enthused over the prospect for the establishment of such 
a factory in this city. The old building that had been 
used as headquarters for the Snell, Taylor & Mix Con- 
struction Company was taken over and converted into a 
factory and operations started. The venture proved a sue- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 771 

cess from the first and grew by leaps and bounds until it 
was soon commanding attention in its field. In the year 
1877, the business venture was incorporated under the 
name of the Illinois Canning Company, Inc., in the State 
of Illinois, and this name has remained unchanged to the 
present day, although the business has passed from the 
hands of the original founders. 

In the period between the year 1878, when the business 
was incorporated, and the year 1902, William Moore and 
James A. Cunningham, two of Hoopeston's pioneer citi- 
zens who had been interested in the company from its 
beginning here, acquired the controlling interest. Of later 
years, the control of the company passed from these citi- 
zens to the following officials and directors, who guide its 
destinies at the present day: Isaac Miller Hamilton, Chi- 
cago, president; W. A. Miskimen, vice president and gen- 
eral manager; S. B. Cutright, secretary; and R. M. Zook, 
treasurer. Executive Committee: W. A. Miskimen, S. B. 
Cutright, and R. M. Zook. 

Much of the product of the Illinois Canning Company 
that is canned annually, is grown under the direct super- 
vision of its experts. Thousands of acres of land are 
owned or leased from year to year in the immediate vicin- 
ity of this city by the company to insure a fancy grade of 
corn and beans coming to the factory during the pack 
season. Although the company has enjoyed a steady and 
continual growth during the years from the date of its 
founding to the present day, perhaps the greatest improve- 
ment to come at any time took place during the first six 
months of 1925, when following out a program of build- 
ing and improvement, decided upon several seasons before, 
and for which they had been quietly preparing, the com- 
pany increased their warehouse facilities here by some 
two hundred thousand cases as well as effecting a much 
better arrangement of their factory and farm facilities. 
Included in this improvement was the locating of all farm- 



772 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ing equipment at the Brigg's place, a twenty acre tract 
at Orange Street and South Second Avenue. A storage 
implement house, 40 x 200 feet; a feed barn 60 x 225 feet; 
a stock barn 74 x 250 feet were built on this tract, which 
was surrounded with a seven foot chain link fence, with 
one main entrance gate on Orange Street. A locker room 
and bunkhouse, also included in the improvement, were 
built just inside of the gate. This improvement left avail- 
able the huge building on the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
Railroad, extending from Washington to Lincoln Street, 
for storage purposes and as a loading warehouse from 
which the product of the Illinois Canning Factory can 
now be loaded direct to waiting freight cars on this rail- 
road, for shipment to the markets of the world. 

Purity and quality of the goods canned by the Illinois 
Canning Company have been maintained with a faithful- 
ness and conscientious fidelity to their reputation that has 
brought praise from all parts of the nation. The steady 
growth of the business, one of the most important of this 
city's industries, is the only testimonial needed to prove 
that quality. 



Nathan Dowell, a veteran of the World War, is well 
and favorably known at Armstrong, where he is agent for 
the Illinois Central Railroad. He was born at Breckin- 
ridge, Kentucky, February 14, 1889, the son of Ezra and 
Anna (Wood) Dowell. 

Ezra Dowell was a native of Kentucky, as was also his 
wife. He was a farmer throughout his active career and 
owned a well improved farm of five hundred acres in Ken- 
tucky. He specialized in the raising of tobacco. Mr. 
Dowell died February 8, 1925, and his wife died in 1891. 
Both are buried at Freedom, Breckinridge County, Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Dowell was a Republican, a member of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and Masonic Lodge. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 773 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Dowell were, as fol- 
lows: Frank, Charles, and Austin, farmers, Breckinridge 
County, Kentucky; Seth Thomas, lives at Freemont, 
Nebraska; Ellen, married S. M. Haynes, lives at Garfield, 
Kentucky; Cora, married Robert Poole, lives in Breckin- 
ridge County, Kentucky; and Nathan, the subject of this 
sketch. 

Nathan Dowell received his education in the public 
schools of Breckinridge County, Kentucky, and in 1910 
was graduated from Harned Normal College. He later 
was graduated from Bryan & Stratton Business College, 
and then learned telegraphy at the United Telegraphers 
School, Cincinnati, Ohio. He also studied at the Illinois 
Railroad Training School at Chicago, Illinois. He began 
as station helper at Divernon, Illinois, for the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad, later worked as an extra operator between 
St. Louis, Missouri, and Clinton, Illinois, on the Spring- 
field Division, and then as agent at Alvin, Illinois. In 1918 
Mr. Dowell enlisted for service in the World War and was 
sent to Fort Wright, New York, where he was assigned 
to the Sixty-eighth Coast Artillery Corps, as a member of 
Battery E. He saw active service in France and was dis- 
charged from the army on March 6, 1919. Mr. Dowell 
then re-entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad 
as agent at Beason, Illinois, and was later transferred to 
Armstrong as agent. 

On December 24, 1921, Mr. Dowell was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Ebba Sigfridson, the daughter of Peter 
and Joanne Sigfridson, of Geneva, Illinois. They are 
natives of Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. Dowell have a daughter, 
Joanne. 

Mr. Dowell is a member of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian Church, Rossville Lodge No. 527, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, American Legion, and Order of Railway 
Telegraphers. In politics he is a Republican. 



774 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Lem Neville. — One of the well known and highly 
esteemed young men of Vermilion County is Lem Neville, 
who is serving as postmaster of Catlin. He was born at 
Cayuga, Indiana, May 5, 1898, the son of William and 
Anna (Clinesmyth) Neville. 

William Neville was born at Industry, Pennsylvania, in 
1861, and his wife was born near Fithian, Illinois. She 
was the daughter of George and Elizabeth (Blue) Cline- 
smyth, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Penn- 
sylvania. Both are buried in Stearns Cemetery, near 
Muncie, Illinois. They were early settlers of that section 
and prominent farmers of Fithian. William Neville was 
a young man when he came to Grape Creek, in Illinois. 
He was a miner and later lived at Cayuga, Indiana, and 
Muncie, Illinois. He came to Catlin in 1900 and was 
employed as a contractor in the mines of the Deering Coal 
Company. Mr. Neville was a Democrat, a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and Loyal Order of Moose. He died January 12, 1918, and 
his widow lives at Catlin. They were the parents of two 
children: Lem, the subject of this sketch; and Harvey, 
who died June 14, 1924. 

Lem Neville attended the public schools of Catlin and 
following his graduation from high school he took a busi- 
ness course at Brown's Business College. He served as 
time keeper for the Hegeler Zinc Company for a time 
before entering the employ of the Danville post office as 
a carrier. In 1919 he went to Decatur, Illinois, and later 
that year was transferred to the postal department at 
Denver, Colorado. He returned to Decatur the following 
year and in 1921 was transferred to Oak Park, Illinois. 
During this time Mr. Neville took a course in engineering 
from the International Correspondence Schools, Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, and later entered the employ of the Public 
Service Company of Northern Illinois, at Chicago. He 
served as an electrical engineer and sub-station operator. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 775 

He resigned from this position, however, after a short 
time and entered the general post office in Chicago as a 
clerk. He became a carrier out of Station C, Chicago, and 
resigned on May 1, 1923, and came to Catlin to work in 
the mines. On July 24, 1924, he was appointed postmaster 
of Catlin, and has continued in that office to the present 
time. 

On October 14, 1928, Mr. Neville was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Garnett Watson, the daughter of C. H. 
and Margaret Jane Watson, natives of Adams County, 
Illinois. He died in 1918 and is buried at Quincy, Illinois. 
His widow lives at Rock Island, Illinois. Mr. Watson was 
an engineer on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
for many years. 

Mr. Neville is a Republican, a member of the Presby- 
terian Church, Catlin Lodge No. 285, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
No. 82, and Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree. 



Ross Donaldson, one of the oldest and best known mer- 
chants of Armstrong, is a native of Illinois. He was born 
near Ogden, Champaign County, April 19, 1878, the son 
of William Alonzo and Mary Alice (Divan) Donaldson. 

William Alonzo Donaldson was born in Fountain 
County, Indiana, December 25, 1846, and his wife was a 
native of Ohio. He spent his boyhood on his father's farm 
and went to Livingston County, Missouri, about 1892. He 
returned to Illinois in 1899 and settled at Armstrong, 
where he was living retired at the time of his death in 
1915. His wife died in 1899. Both are buried in Stearns 
Cemetery, near Ogden, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Donald- 
son the following children were born: Ellsworth and 
Alfred, both deceased; Ross, the subject of this sketch; 
Lulu, who died in 1912; Sadie, married James Ridge, lives 



776 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

at Lansing, Michigan; Clarence, lives at Ligonier, Indiana; 
and Druzilla, married Harold McGehy, lives at Urbana, 
Illinois. 

Ross Donaldson obtained his education in the public 
schools of Ogden, Illinois. He assisted on his father's 
farm for a time and in 1899 located at Armstrong. The 
following year he went to Janesburg, Illinois, where he 
clerked in a grocery store for two years. Upon his return 
to Armstrong in 1902 Mr. Donaldson clerked in the store 
of J. W. Miller and remained in his employ for ten years. 
He then managed a store for Joseph Cook and later clerked 
in the store of W. D. Fortner for two years. In 1920 he 
purchased the business of Mr. Fortner, which he has suc- 
cessfully conducted to the present time. 

In 1903 Mr. Donaldson was united in marriage with 
Miss Georgiana Bruner, the daughter of George and Anna 
Bruner, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. Bruner lives retired 
at Armstrong. His wife is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Don- 
aldson have two adopted children, Robert L. and Leola, 
both at home. 

Mr. Donaldson is a Republican and holds membership 
in the Methodist Church. 



James E. Mullins is the proprietor of one of the best 
known and well patronized garages in Muncie. He is a 
native of Vermilion County, born in Pilot Township, May 
18, 1889, the son of Caleb and Isabelle (Watson) Mullins. 

Caleb Mullins was born in Knox County, Kentucky, in 
1844, the son of Jacob Mullins, who brought his family to 
Vermilion County in 1856 and settled near Oakwood. 
They became successful farmers. Caleb Mullins died May 
13, 1923, and his wife, born in Illinois in 1850, died Decem- 
ber 30, 1920. Both are buried in Johnson Hill Cemetery, 
Vermilion County. They had the following children: 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 777 

Wilson Hoyston, deceased; Anne, deceased; C. Frank, lives 
at Danville; William J., lives near Homer, Illinois; Zach- 
ariah, deceased; John Wesley, a World War veteran, 
served in France for twenty-two months with the Thirty- 
third Division, lives at Danville; James E., the subject of 
this sketch; and Grover C, lives at Danville. 

James E. Mullins atended the public schools of Homer, 
Illinois, and spent his boyhood on his father's farm. In 
1921 he became a dealer in farm implements and the fol- 
lowing year came to Muncie, where he established his 
present garage business. He is an expert automobile 
mechanic and through hard work is establishing an excel- 
lent reputation throughout the community. He also does 
general trucking. 

On December 26, 1923, Mr. Mullins was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Iva Payne, the daughter of Samuel and 
Delia (Gillian) Payne, natives of Illinois and Kentucky, 
respectively. They are residents of Fithian, Illinois. Mr. 
and Mrs. Mullins have a son, Ernest Elvin, born March 
25, 1925. 

Mr. Mullins is independent in politics. 



Sylvanus J. Wade. — One of the most popular merchants 
of Muncie is Mr. Wade, who has also served as postmaster 
since 1914. He was born in Parke County, Indiana, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1861, the son of Thomas B. C. and Susan (Vin- 
cent) Wade. 

Thomas B. C. Wade was born in Butler County, Ohio, 
March 4, 1821, and his wife was born in Parke County, 
Indiana, April 20, 1830. He was a farmer in early life 
and also a stone mason. He was four years old when 
he came to Parke County, Indiana, with his parents. Later, 
in 1869, Mr. Wade went to Kansas, where he engaged in 
farming. He also lived in Iowa and was living retired at 



778 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

the time of his death, May 19, 1896. His wife died Sep- 
tember 21, 1901. Both are buried in Vermilion County in 
the Stearns Cemetery, which is located near Muncie. Mr. 
Wade was a lifelong Democrat. There were three chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. Wade: E. R., lives at Danville; 
Sylvanus J., the subject of this sketch; and Minerva E., 
married Grant Diggs, lives at Muncie, Illinois. 

The boyhood of Sylvanus J. Wade was spent in Boone 
County, Indiana, and he attended the district schools. He 
also lived at Georgia City and Pierce City, Missouri. In 
1876 Mr. Wade came to Muncie, where he was employed 
in the mines until February, 1914. Since that time he has 
served as postmaster of Muncie and also conducts a gen- 
eral store. 

Since 1912 Mr. Wade has been a local representative 
for the Aetna Insurance Company, of Hartford, Con- 
necticut. 

Politically, Mr. Wade is a Democrat. He held the office 
of police magistrate for the village of Muncie for sixteen 
years. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen of America, 
and Illinois Postmasters League. 



Edward Arthur Jones, who is proprietor of A. Jones' 
Sons Store, Catlin, is a member of one of the oldest and 
best known families of Vermilion County. He was born 
at Catlin, November 24, 1871, the son of Arthur and Emma 
(Dickison) Jones. 

Arthur Jones was born in London, England, and his 
wife was also a native of that country. He came to this 
country with his parents and they settled on a farm near 
Catlin, in Vermilion County. Mr. Jones attended West- 
field Business College, and in 1849, in partnership with 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 779 

his brother, Frederick Jones, established a general mer- 
cantile business at Catlin. In 1867 Mr. Jones purchased 
his brother's interests in the store, which was destroyed 
by fire in 1905. Mr. Jones was also an extensive lumber 
dealer of this section. He rebuilt his store in 1906 and 
continued in business until the time of his death in 1912. 
Mr. Jones was a Republican and held many township 
offices, and also served as postmaster for many years. He 
was a member of the Methodist Church, and belonged to 
Catlin Lodge No. 285, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Past Master, and Modern Woodmen of America. Emma 
(Dickison) Jones lives at Catlin. There were five children 
in the Jones family, as follows : Edward Arthur, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; W. H., insurance, lives at Catlin; Dora, 
married Fred Cook, lives at Catlin; and Nettie and Cora, 
both deceased. 

Edward Arthur Jones was educated in the schools of 
Catlin and attended Gem City Business College, Quincy, 
Illinois, from which he was graduated in 1895. He clerked 
in his father's store for a time and in 1900 became a part- 
ner in the business with his father and another brother, 
W. H. Jones. After the death of the elder Mr. Jones the 
sons continued the business until 1916, at which time 
Edward A. Jones became owner. 

In 1903 Mr. Jones was united in marriage with Miss 
Jennie Meneley, of Catlin. Their daughter, Melba, mar- 
ried Howard Clark, of Catlin, who is associated in busi- 
ness with Mr. Jones. They have a son, Joseph Clark. Mrs. 
Clark is a graduate of Catlin High School and later studied 
music. 

Mr. Jones is a member of Catlin Lodge No. 285, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, thirty- 
second degree, and Modern Woodmen of America. He is 
a Republican in politics and holds membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 



780 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Ernest M. Dewhirst, M. D. — Among the most success- 
ful of the younger members of the medical profession in 
Vermilion County is Doctor Dewhirst, of Catlin. He was 
born in Clay County, Illinois, February 17, 1903, the son 
of Arthur and Nellie (Runyon) Dewhirst. 

Arthur Dewhirst was born in Clay County, Illinois, and 
his wife is a native of Richland County. They are now 
residents of Bridgeport, Illinois. Mr. Dewhirst followed 
general farming throughout his active career and retired 
in 1923. He has lived at Bridgeport since 1917. Mr. Dew- 
hirst is a Republican and has served as school director and 
township assessor and collector. He is a member of the 
Methodist Church and has been superintendent of the 
Sunday School for fifteen years. To Mr. and Mrs. Dew- 
hirst were born six children, as follows : Gladys, married 
John Lough, lives at Colorado Springs, Colorado; Lola, 
married Frank Ping, lives at Bridgeport, Illinois; Ruby, 
married Rossiter Matson, lives at Los Angeles, California; 
Ernest M., the subject of this sketch; Leslie, who died in 
1926; and Evelyn, at home. 

Ernest M. Dewhirst received his early schooling in the 
public schools of Richland County, Illinois. He was a 
member of the graduating class of Bridgeport Township 
High School in 1921 and then entered the University of 
Illinois, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in 1925 and the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1928. His interne work was done at Interne Cottage Hos- 
pital, Santa Barbara, California, during 1927-28, and in 
November, 1928, Doctor Dewhirst came to Catlin, where 
he took over the practice of Doctor Cloyd. He has an 
extensive private practice and is also physician and sur- 
geon for the Peabody, Taylor-English, and United Electric 
Mines. 

In 1927 Doctor Dewhirst was united in marriage with 
Miss Lorraine Van Vleck, the daughter of Charles F. and 
Anna (Hoover) Van Vleck, of Philo, Illinois. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 781 

Doctor Dewhirst is identified with the Vermilion 
County Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society, 
and the American Medical Association. He is a Repub- 
lican, a member of the Methodist Church, and belongs to 
Omega Beta Pi and Phi Chi fraternities. Doctor Dew- 
hirst was vice president of the Class of 1927 at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, and was active in the athletic and fra- 
ternal life of the university. 



John W. Newlin, deceased, was a highly esteemed and 
well known citizen of Ridge Farm, where he spent many 
years of his life. He was born at Bloomingdale, Parke 
County, Indiana, August 14, 1841, the son of Jacob and 
Sarah (Woody) Newlin. 

Jacob Newlin was a native of North Carolina, as was 
his wife. They were pioneer settlers of Indiana and 
entered land from the government, which they improved, 
and upon which they lived for many years. The Newlins 
became successful farmers. Both Jacob Newlin and his 
wife are buried in Bloomingdale Cemetery. Their chil- 
dren were, as follows: Sinia, Levi, Exum, Ira, Matilda, 
and Emily, all deceased; and John W., the subject of this 
sketch. 

John W. Newlin attended the rural schools of Parke 
County, Indiana, and he was reared on a farm. Early 
in life he learned the carpenter's trade and spent several 
years at Bloomingdale, Parke County, Indiana. In 1889 
he removed to Ridge Farm, Illinois, where he followed his 
trade, and he later became a leading building contractor 
of this section of the county. He was recognized as an 
expert workman and numerous residences at Ridge Farm 
stand as testimony of his workmanship. Mr. Newlin 
retired from business in 1918 and died December 12, 1927. 
He is buried at Ridge Farm. 



782 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On January 1, 1880, Mr. Newlin was united in marriage 
with Miss Mary Meriweather, the daughter of David and 
Almira (Harkness) Meriweather. To John W. and Mary 
(Meriweather) Newlin were born three children: Irvin 
M., born January 8, 1881, lives at Springfield, Illinois, mar- 
ried Xenie Cunningham, and they have a daughter, 
Florence Jean; Florence, born April 23, 1883, married on 
May 29, 1928, to William Rowland Cormack, who was born 
September 29, 1879. She is librarian of the Carnegie 
Library at Ridge Farm; and Clayton J., born May 29, 
1885, lives at Normal, Illinois. He married Sally Maude 
Cox, and they have three sons, John Cox, Robert E., and 
William B. 

Mr. Newlin was a Republican and a member of the 
Society of Friends Church. 



Ferris H. Jones is a veteran of the World War and one 
of the popular young business men of Catlin, where he is 
proprietor of the F. H. Jones Store. He is a native of Cat- 
lin, born March 20, 1894, the son of Henry R. and Anna V. 
(Champion) Jones. 

Henry R. Jones, a highly esteemed citizen of Catlin, is 
a native of this place. He spent his boyhood on a farm 
and after his marriage came to Catlin, where he engaged 
in the meat business with his brother, Walter A. Jones. 
Mr. Jones also served as postmaster for a period of seven- 
teen years and was town collector for eight years. He 
later lived in Chicago, Illinois, where he was cashier of 
one of the J. R. Thompson restaurants. In 1917 he re- 
turned to Catlin, and was associated for a time with the 
Taylor-English Coal Company. He has been identified 
with his son's general mercantile business since 1925. Mr. 
Jones is a Republican, a member of the Methodist Church, 
and belongs to Catlin Lodge No. 285, Ancient Free and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 783 

Accepted Masons, Past Master, Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; and Modern Woodmen of America. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jones are the parents of five children : Grace 
V., married Charles H. Hughes, lives in Chicago; Claude 
R., lives at Lewistown, Pennsylvania; Russell F., lives at 
Catlin, is a World War veteran, having served in France 
with the One Hundred Thirty-second Infantry, Thirty- 
third Division; Ferris H., the subject of this sketch; and 
Lloyd W., lives at Danville, also a World War veteran. 

Following his graduation from Catlin Township High 
School in 1913, Ferris H. Jones went to Chicago, where 
he accepted a position with the credit department of the 
Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company. At the outbreak of the 
World War he went to Danville and enlisted in the band 
of the One Hundred Forty-ninth Field Artillery, Forty- 
second (Rainbow) Division. He went to France with this 
outfit and served in the following battles and drives: 
Luneville, Baccarat, Champagne, Marne, St. Mihiel, and 
Muese-Argonne. He was discharged at Camp Grant, Illi- 
nois, May 12, 1919, after having served with the Army of 
Occupation in Germany from November 17, 1918, until 
April 4, 1919. After his discharge from the service, Mr. 
Jones was employed by the American Bridge Company, 
at Gary, Indiana. In October, 1919, he purchased the gen- 
eral store of Henry Jones, Jr., at Catlin, in partnership 
with his brother, Russell, and they continued in business 
together until 1927, when Ferris H. Jones became owner 
of the entire business, the company thereafter being 
known as F. H. Jones Store. 

On January 1, 1920, Mr. Jones was united in marriage 
with Miss Hazel M. Stallings, the daughter of LeRoy and 
Pearl (Burgett) Stallings, of Fairmount, Illinois. 

Politically, Mr. Jones is a Republican. He was elected 
supervisor of Catlin Township in April, 1929, and is also 
serving as a member of the Board of Education. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has the 



784 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

following lodge affiliations: Catlin Lodge, No. 285, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons; Order of the Eastern 
Star, No. 377, Gao Grotto; Mystice Order of Veiled Proph- 
ets of the Enchanted Realm, and belongs to the Danville 
Consistory; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; 
and Republican Veterans League. 



Richard R. Zook, who died August 23, 1928, was a lead- 
ing citizen and representative business man of Hoopes- 
ton, where he was vice president and general manager of 
the Illinois Canning Company. He was born at Shep- 
pardstown, Pennsylvania, November 13, 1862, the son of 
Jacob and Lavina Zook. 

Jacob Zook, a native of Pennsylvania, was a manu- 
facturer of bricks and was numbered among the prominent 
men of Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. He was also an ex- 
tensive real estate owner. He was twice married. To his 
first marriage two daughters were born, Mrs. Annette 
Lee, deceased, and Mrs. Lillian Manche, deceased, and to 
his second union four children were born as follows : Mrs. 
Florence Beaven, of Hillsboro, Maryland; Mrs. Carrie 
Bishop, of Wilmington, Delaware; Richard R., the subject 
of this sketch; and Mrs. Minerva Savage, of Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Richard R. Zook grew up in Pennsylvania and attended 
the public schools. He was employed at various occupa- 
tions early in life and for a time conducted a general mer- 
cantile business at Cheneyville. Later, he came to Hoopes- 
ton, where he became a horse buyer, shipping to the mar- 
kets. He also conducted a livery business on the present 
site of the Kimberlin Garage. In 1908 he went with the 
Illinois Canning Company as field manager. He remained 
with that concern until the time of his death and worked 
his way up to the office of general superintendent, being 




RICHARD R ZOOK 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 785 

finally elected vice president and general manager in 1927. 
Honesty and square dealing were outstanding character- 
istics of Mr. Zook's business dealings, and throughout his 
business career he was a friend of the working man. He 
was always held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. 

On July 11, 1895, Mr. Zook married Mrs. Ella (Moore) 
Trostle, the daughter of William Maxwell and Mahala 
(Brown) Moore, natives of Indiana. Mr. Moore died in 
1913 and his wife died in 1923. Both are buried at Zion 
City, Illinois. The Moores located in Iroquois County, 
Illinois, about 1861 and were highly esteemed members of 
that section for many years. Mr. Moore retired in 1893 
and lived in Chicago until 1907, at which time he located 
at Zion City, Illinois. To Richard R. and Ella (Moore) 
Zook were born three sons : Maxwell, lives at Hoopeston ; 
Eugene, born in May, 1903, died January 7, 1908; and 
Paul, who attends the University of Illinois. 

By a former marriage to Willis F. Trostle, Mrs. Zook 
was the mother of one son, Bernal M. Trostle, of Peublo, 
Colorado. He married Bertha Sudan, and they have three 
children: Banetta, Lois Jean, and Betty June. Mrs. 
Zook's first husband, Willis F. Trostle, died August 1, 
1893, and is buried at Milford, Illinois. 

Mr. Zook was a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America, Commercial Club, and Chamber of Commerce, 
Hoopeston. 



William F. Temple is a leading and well known citizen 
of Fairmount, where he is serving as postmaster. He was 
born at Sidney, Illinois, February 11, 1867, the son of 
George W. and Elizabeth (Biggs) Temple. 

George W. Temple was born in Pennsylvania, the son 
of George and Nancy (Hanks) Temple, natives of Ken- 
tucky. He is buried in Kentucky and his wife is buried 
in Kansas. She was a cousin of Abraham Lincoln. George 

16— Vol. 2 



786 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

W. Temple came to Sidney, Illinois, before the Civil War, 
and became a prosperous farmer and stockman. He also 
served as road commissioner of Champaign County for 
thirty-six years. He was a Republican and a member of 
the Methodist Church. Mr. Temple died in 1889 and his 
wife died in 1895. Both are buried at Sidney, Illinois. 
They were the parents of the following children: Win- 
field Scott, lives at Danville; Jerry, deceased; Josie, the 
widow of John Wapples, lives in California; Bergen, de- 
ceased; Mary, the widow of James Pate, lives at Fair- 
mount; William F., the subject of this sketch; Laura, mar- 
ried Sheridan Cole, lives at San Francisco, California; and 
Moses S., lives at Croswell, Michigan. 

William F. Temple obtained his schooling in the public 
schools of Sidney, Illinois, and is a graduate of Sidney 
High School. In 1897 he came to Fairmount, where he 
became interested in the shipping of live stock. He re- 
mained in that business until 1910, at which time he was 
appointed postmaster of Fairmount. He served for five 
years and then purchased the hardware business of J. S. 
Crommell, which he successfully conducted until 1928. At 
that time he again became postmaster. He has also served 
as town clerk for six years, as supervisor for one year, 
and as a member of the town board for six years. He is 
chairman of the Vermilion County Republican Committee. 

In 1895 Mr. Temple was united in marriage with Miss 
Zuma B. Wilson, the daughter of Van and Lucy Wilson, 
the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Pennsyl- 
vania. They are now residents of Sidney, Illinois. Mr. 
Wilson is a veteran of the Civil War. Mr. and Mrs. Temple 
have no children. 

Mr. Temple has always been a Republican. He is an 
elder of the Presbyterian Church, and belongs to Fair- 
mount Lodge No. 590, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple, 
and Modern Woodmen of America. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 787 

Before her marriage, Mrs. Temple was a teacher in the 
schools of Vermilion County for twenty years and served 
as assistant county superintendent of schools. 



Herman F. Keeney, who is principal of Catlin Town- 
ship High School, is among the representative young men 
of Vermilion County. He was born at Catlin, January 1, 
1902, the son of Walter Scott and Laura (Driscoll) Keeney. 

Walter Scott Keeney is a native of Catlin, born in 
August, 1864. His wife was born in Indiana. Mr. Keeney 
is numbered among the most successful farmers and stock- 
men of Vermilion County. He is a Republican, a member 
of the Knights of Pythias, and Modern Woodmen of 
America. Mr. and Mrs. Keeney have two children: Inez, 
married M. B. Stine, lives at Danville, and they have four 
children, La Verne, Floyd, Raymond, and Curtis; and Her- 
man F., the subject of this sketch. 

Herman F. Keeney attended the public schools of Cat- 
lin and entered the University of Illinois after his gradua- 
tion from Catlin Township High School in 1921. He 
completed his university work in 1925 and began his teach- 
ing career at Reddick, Illinois, where he remained for 
two years as a teacher of agriculture. During 1927-29 he 
taught agriculture and science at Catlin Township High 
School, and in 1929 was appointed principal of the school. 
In 1929 he took post graduate work in education at the 
University of Illinois. While a student at the University 
of Illinois he was a member of the Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps, and received the commission of second lieu- 
tenant. In 1928 he was appointed first lieutenant and 
assigned to the Three Hundred Twenty-fourth Tank Bat- 
talion, Eighty-sixth Division. 

On June 12, 1926, Mr. Keeney was united in marriage 
with Miss Jane Squires, the daughter of Brice and Ada 



788 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

(Hodson) Squires, residents of Catlin. Mr. Squires and 
his wife now reside in Catlin. Mr. and Mrs. Keeney have 
a son, John Fletcher, born March 30, 1928. 

Mr. Keeney is a member of the Methodist Church and 
is Sunday School superintendent. He is affiliated with 
Gardner Lodge No. 573, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Knights of Pythias, and Alpha Tau Alpha fra- 
ternity. 

An outside interest of Mr. Keeney's is the breeding of 
fine sheep and he has taken numerous prizes at County 
and State fairs. 



Pete Okuly is a widely known and highly esteemed cit- 
izen of Fairmount, where he is manager of the holdings of 
the Illinois Steel Company. He was born at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, January 9, 1871, the son of George and Frances 
(Steiner) Okuly. 

Both George Okuly and his wife were natives of 
Stroudsburg, Germany. Following their marriage they 
emigrated to the United States and settled at Niagara 
Falls, New York, where Mr. Okuly followed his trade. 
Later, they lived at Cincinnati, Ohio, and in February, 
1875, the family removed to Oakwood, Illinois, where Mr. 
Okuly was section foreman on the old Indianapolis, Bloom- 
ington & Western Railroad, now a section of the Big Four 
Railroad. He was thus employed for twenty-six years, 
after which he removed to Fairmount. He lived there 
retired until the time of his death, January 19, 1904. His 
wife died in September, 1925. Both are buried in Green- 
view Cemetery. Mr. Okuly was a Democrat and a member 
of the Catholic Church. There were nine children in the 
Okuly family, as follows: Carrie, married William Moore, 
both deceased; Adam, lives at Decatur, Illinois; Barbara, 
the widow of Henry Robbins, lives at Danville; Margaret, 
lives at Danville; Myrtle, the widow of Thomas Reeves; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 789 

George, lives at Niantic, Illinois; Pete, the subject of this 
sketch; Lena, married M. Crawford, lives at Oakwood, 
Illinois; and Bertha, married William Long, lives at Ham- 
mond, Indiana. 

Pete Okuly attended the public schools of Oakwood, 
Illinois. At an early age he learned telegraphy and was 
employed as an operator by the Big Four Railroad at 
Lilly, Illinois, for eight years. He then went to East 
Saint Louis as an operator for the Chicago, Peoria & 
Saint Louis Railroad, and later was employed as a brake- 
man and finally as a conductor on that road. In 1904 he 
came to Fairmount and was employed as a miner for the 
Consolidated Coal Company. He subsequently worked for 
the Shirkey Coal Company, and then entered the First 
National Bank, of Fairmount, as bookkeeper. He also 
clerked in the Runyon general store for almost five years 
and then purchased the Temple Restaurant, which he con- 
ducted for a short time. On account of ill health, Mr. 
Okuly was forced to retire from business for almost two 
years after which he went with the Casparis Stone Com- 
pany, of Fairmount, as a shipping clerk. On May 1, 1921, 
the Illinois Steel Company purchased this quarry and Mr. 
Okuly remained as shipping clerk. In 1928 the company 
moved all of its equipment from Fairmount and left Mr. 
Okuly in charge of the property at this place. Mr. Okuly 
is the owner of valuable real estate in Danville and Fair- 
mount, and also owns the Shell Service Station, at Fair- 
mount. 

On June 24, 1892, Mr. Okuly was united in marriage 
with Miss Emma Hughes, the daughter of Rev. David 
Hughes, a native of Muncie, Illinois. He was a minister 
of the Baptist Church and for a number of years lived 
at Crawfordsville, Indiana. To Mr. and Mrs. Okuly were 
born three children : Delmar, who is manager of the Shell 
Service Station, Fairmount, is a World War veteran, hav- 
ing served in France. He married Reva Gillespie, and they 



790 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

have four children: Delmar, Jr., Eloise, Le Wanda, and 
Beverly; (2) Gladys, married Arthur Boorde, lives at Dan- 
ville. They have two children, Garreth and Jack; (3) 
Helen, assistant postmaster, Fairmount. 

Mr. Okuly is a Republican in politics. He has served 
on the village board for ten years, as a member of the 
school board for seven years, and as postmaster of Lilly, 
Illinois, for five years. He is a member of Fairmount 
Lodge, No. 590, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 973; Knights of 
Pythias, No. 268; and Rebekah Lodge. His wife is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. He and his family have an 
extensive acquaintance throughout Vermilion County and 
are well liked. 



George R. Catlett. — The career of George R. Catlett 
has long been identified with the business life of Fair- 
mount, where he is president of the First National Bank. 
He was born in Vermilion County, August 23, 1864, the 
son of Hiram H. and Lorinda (Roudebush) Catlett. 

Hiram H. Catlett was born at Charlottsville, Virginia, 
October 21, 1823, and his wife was a native of Ohio. He 
came to Vermilion County when he was twenty-two years 
of age, and for many years was one of the most successful 
stockmen in this section of the state. In partnership with 
his brother, Harold Catlett, he owned and operated one 
thousand five hundred acres of land. Mr. Catlett died in 
1903 and his wife died April 30, 1910. Besides his exten- 
sive land holdings in Vermilion County he was the owner 
of three hundred and twenty acres in Nebraska. He was 
a Democrat and a member of the Baptist Church. Hiram 
H. Catlett was the son of Lawrence T. and Sally (Harman) 
Catlett, natives of Virginia. Lawrence T. Catlett was a 
well educated man, and for a time engaged in the practice 
of law. He was also a saddler and from 1835 until 1846 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 791 

lived at Bloomingburg, Ohio. In October, 1846, he brought 
his family to Vermilion County, being one of the first set- 
tlers of the county. He died July 7, 1861, and his wife died 
January 10, 1871. Both are buried in Davis Cemetery, 
Vance Township, Vermilion County. 

The boyhood of George R. Catlett was spent in Ver- 
milion County, and he received his early education in the 
district schools. He spent two years at the University of 
Mississippi and attended Franklin (Indiana) College. 
When he was twenty-one years old he was given a farm of 
one hundred and six acres by his father. At that time he 
also became associated in the cattle feeding business with 
his father. Mr. Catlett came to Fairmount in 1906 and 
since that date has been a resident of that place. In 1905 
he had purchased the interests of C. F. lies in the Bank 
of lies & White, which then became known as Catlett & 
White. In 1912 Mr. Catlett took over the interests of Mr. 
White and the name of the bank was changed to the 
Exchange Bank, at which time Mr. Catlett became presi- 
dent. The institution became known as the First National 
Bank in 1919, and Mr. Catlett continued as president. He 
is also vice president of the First National Bank, of Homer, 
Illinois, and is treasurer of the Fairmount Building & 
Loan Association. He is the owner of one thousand, two 
hundred acres of fine farm land in Vermilion County and 
operates two thousand acres of land for the Catlett estate. 
He also has large land holdings in Indiana and Oklahoma. 

In 1890 Mr. Catlett was united in marriage with Miss 
Bertie Tilton, the daughter of G. Wilse and Elizabeth 
(Albright) Tilton, natives of Indiana, both now deceased. 
Mr. Tilton was a pioneer merchant of Catlin and was also 
well known as a writer on the Commercial News, Danville. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Catlett were born two children, Shirley T. 
and Kemp R. 

Shirley T. Catlett was born in 1891. He married Effie 
Werhman, and they live at Fairmount, where he is cashier 



792 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

of the First National Bank. He is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois. Mr. Catlett is a member of Fair- 
mount Lodge, No. 285, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
and Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree. 

Kemp R. Catlett was born in 1897. He also attended 
the University of Illinois and is cashier of the First Na- 
tional Bank, of Homer, Illinois. He married Josephine 
Parrish, and they live at Fairmount. He is also affiliated 
with Fairmount Lodge No. 285, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Danville Consistory, and Mohammed Shrine. 

George R. Catlett is a Democrat and holds membership 
in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 



The First National Bank, of Fairmount, is recognized 
as a dependable banking institution of Vermilion County. 
It was organized as a private bank, July 1, 1904, by Charles 
lies and Dr. Howard E. White, and was known as the lies & 
White Bank. 

On September 26, 1905, George R. Catlett purchased 
an interest in the bank, and the name was changed to the 
Exchange Bank. On September 1, 1919, it was incorpo- 
rated under the laws of the State of Illinois as the First 
National Bank, with a capital of thirty thousand dollars. 
The officers were: G. R. Catlett, president; Dale Craig, 
vice president; and Shirley Catlett, cashier. The directors 
were: G. R. Catlett, Dale Craig, Shirley Catlett, Bertie 
T. Catlett, and Kemp R. Catlett. 

The officers of the First National Bank for the year 
1929 are as follows: G. R. Catlett, president; Kemp R. 
Catlett, vice president; Shirley T. Catlett, cashier; and 
John E. Cast, assistant cashier. The directors are: G. R. 
Catlett, Kemp R. Catlett, Shirley T. Catlett, Bertie T. Cat- 
lett, and Effie Catlett. 

The statement of the First National Bank as of March 
27, 1929, is as follows. Resources: Loans and discounts, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 793 

$165,851.07; Overdrafts, $650.96; United States Govern- 
ment securities, $25,126.56; other bonds, stocks and secur- 
ities owned, $6,100.00; Banking House, $4,250; Furniture 
and Fixtures, $3,090.79; Reserve with Federal Reserve 
Bank, $12,570.21; Cash and Due from Banks, $27,163.02; 
Redemption Fund with United States Treasurer and Due 
from Treasurer, $750.00; Total, $245,552.61. Liabilities: 
Capital Stock paid in, $30,000.00; Surplus, $6,000.00; Undi- 
vided Profits, net, $1,287.24; Reserves for Dividends, Con- 
tingencies, etc., $2,963.97; Circulating Notes Outstanding, 
$15,000.00; Demand Deposits, $140,750.35; Time Deposits, 
$49,551.05. Total, $245,552.61. 



Don A. Jones is among the most progressive and suc- 
cessful business men of Ridge Farm, where he is proprietor 
of Jones Garage, local dealers for the Chevrolet automo- 
bile. He was born near Metcalf, Illinois, March 15, 1874, 
the son of William M. and Charity Elizabeth (Blanchard) 
Jones. 

William M. Jones was born at Springfield, Ohio, and his 
wife was a native of Chrisman, Illinois. He came to Illi- 
nois after the Civil War, in which he had served as a 
member of an Ohio outfit. He became a successful farmer 
and owned a well improved farm near Metcalf, Illinois. He 
died in 1908 and his wife died in 1894. Both are buried at 
Chrisman. Mr. Jones was a Democrat and served as road 
commissioner and as a member of the school board. He 
was a member of the Baptist Church and Grand Army of 
the Republic. Charity Elizabeth (Blanchard) Jones was 
the daughter of Horatio Blanchard, who was born in 1804. 
He was engaged in the building of the first building on the 
site of Chicago, having driven a team of oxen there. He 
is buried near Chrisman. To Mr. and Mrs. William M. 



794 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Jones only one child was born, Don A., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Don A. Jones was educated in the public schools of 
Metcalf, Illinois, and in 1893 was graduated from Central 
Normal College, Danville. He remained on his father's 
farm until 1908, at which time the elder Mr. Jones died, 
leaving the land to his son. In 1910 Don A. Jones located 
on a farm of two hundred and twenty-two acres east of 
Ridge Farm, where he remained until 1917. He then sold 
his interests and came to Ridge Farm. He purchased the 
Bantas Garage in October, 1928, and at that time took over 
the agency for the Chevrolet automobile. He operates the 
largest garage in the city and does general repair work. 

In 1895 Mr. Jones was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Ann Barth, the daughter of Andrew and Catherine 
(Barth) Barth, both natives of Stroudsburg, Germany, and 
now deceased. He was an early settler of Columbus, Ohio. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jones have no children. 

Mr. Jones is a member of the Methodist Church, and 
he belongs to Ridge Farm Lodge No. 632, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; Medinah Temple, Chicago. His wife is active in 
the Order of the Eastern Star. They are prominent mem- 
bers of the community in which they live. 



Mrs. Cora M. (Enos) Test, well known throughout Ver- 
milion County as the efficient postmaster of Indianola, is 
a native of Illinois. She was born near Areola, the daugh- 
ter of Frazier P. and Frances C. (Robertson) Enos. 

Frazier P. Enos was born at Oxford, Ohio, and his wife 
was a native of Greensburg, Indiana. He came to Illinois 
with his parents and lived at Areola and Tuscola. In 1900 
he removed to Vermilion County and spent eight years on 
the William Vanneman farm. He retired in 1908 and died 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 795 

February 24, 1925. His wife died in 1905. Both are buried 
at Ridge Farm. Mr. Enos was a Republican and a member 
of the Society of Friends Church. He served about ninety 
days during the Civil War with an Indiana outfit and was a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Enos were born six children, as follows: Cora M., 
the subject of this sketch; Jessie, married L. E. Woods, 
lives at Star City, Indiana; John W., lives at Danville; 
Orpha, lives in Chicago, Illinois; Birney Garfield, who died 
in June, 1901; and Earl C, postmaster, Vermilion Grove, 
Illinois. 

Cora M. Enos attended the public schools of Areola, 
Illinois, and in 1888 was graduated from high school. She 
lived with her grandparents, John and Margaret (Bran- 
non) Enos, for a number of years, and in 1900 went with 
her father. She came to Indianola in 1909. She had mar- 
ried Richard J. Test, on January 22, 1908. He is the son 
of John and Phoebe (Sheets) Test, the former a native 
of New Jersey and the latter of Ohio. Both are deceased 
and are buried in Conkey Cemetery, Paris, Illinois. He 
was a veteran of the Civil War. Richard J. Test was born 
at Paris, Illinois, December 10, 1867. He followed general 
farming until 1909 and served as deputy sheriff from 1911 
until 1915, and as constable from 1908 until the present 
time. He is also assistant postmaster. Mrs. Test was 
acting postmaster from March 24, 1922, until August 12, 
1922, and was appointed postmaster by President Warren 
G. Harding on August 12, 1922. 

Mrs. Test is a Republican in politics, a member of the 
Church of Christ, and belongs to the Order of the Eastern 
Star, Royal Neighbors, Illinois Postmasters League, and 
American Postmasters Association. 

Mr. Test is affiliated with Vermilion Lodge, No. 265, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Gao Grotto, and Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. 



796 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Wilbur W. Gibbs, who is one of the most successful mer- 
chants of Indianola, is a native of Illinois. He was born 
at Riola, April 1, 1886, the son of Albert H. and Mary K. 
(Dye) Gibbs. 

Albert H. Gibbs was born in Iowa. Early in life he 
came to Illinois, where he followed his trade as a brick 
mason. He was located at Danville for some time and later 
worked at Riola, where he was married. He then settled 
on a farm and after a number of years removed to George- 
town, Illinois. He returned, however, to Riola and in 1909 
came to Indianola, where he purchased an interest in 
James Healy's store. His son, Fred Gibbs, became half 
owner of the business and later Albert H. Gibbs sold his 
interests to Wilbur W., the subject of this sketch. Mr. 
Gibbs has since lived retired at Indianola. He is a Repub- 
lican. Mary K. (Dye) Gibbs was born at Riola, Illinois, 
and died in 1913. She is buried at Indianola. Four chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs: Fred, general 
merchant, Indianola; Wilbur W., the subject of this sketch; 
Nora, married Chester Baum, lives in Carroll Township, 
Vermilion County; and Addie, married Vere Ross, lives at 
Anderson, Indiana. 

Wilbur W. Gibbs was educated in the public schools of 
Indianola, where he has spent practically his entire life. 
He became a clerk in his father's store after his graduation 
from Indianola High School, and later purchased his 
father's share in the business. The store was finally sold 
to Fred Gibbs and Wilbur W. Gibbs became interested in 
the breeding of pure bred Poland China hogs on his farm 
of eighty acres near Indianola. He continued in that work 
for nine years and then became associated with the Sidell 
Motor Company, Indianola. Later, he was connected with 
the International Harvesting Company as a salesman and 
in 1922 went with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad 
at Danville. Four years later he purchased the grocery 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 797 

and meat business of Blaine Willison, which he has since 
most successfully conducted. 

In 1914 Mr. Gibbs married Miss Susie Matkin, the 
daughter of Theodore H. and Sarah (Rainey) Matkin, of 
Indianola. Both Mr. and Mrs. Matkin are deceased. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs a daughter was born, Veneta. 

Politically, Mr. Gibbs is a Republican, and he has served 
as precinct committeeman and road commissioner, and he 
is affiliated with Vermilion Lodge, No. 265, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Past Master; Gao Grotto; and the 
Mystic Order Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm. 



Harry E. Watkins, of Indianola, is cashier of the First 
State Bank & Trust Company. He was born at Danville, 
Illinois, October 15, 1893, the son of Albert F. and Emma 
J. (Bracewell) Watkins. 

Albert F. Watkins, who lives retired at Danville, is a 
native of Wisconsin. He spent his boyhood there and early 
in life became a miner. He was employed in the old Kelly 
Mines of Danville after coming to Illinois and finally be- 
came superintendent of the Stansbury and Watkins Coal 
Mine, at Hungry Hollow, near Danville. He served in that 
capacity until his retirement in 1920. Mr. Watkins is a 
Republican, and a member of the First Congregational 
Church. His wife is a native of Danville. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Watkins were born four children: Winifred, de- 
ceased; Mabel, married Rev. W. C. Reeder, lives at Spring- 
field, Illinois; Byron, a World War veteran, lives at Dan- 
ville; and Harry E., the subject of this sketch. 

Harry E. Watkins grew up in Danville and received his 
education in the public schools. Following his graduation 
from high school in 1911 he entered Brown's Business Col- 
lege. After leaving school he entered the employ of the 
Fidelity Investment & Loan Association as a bookkeeper. 



798 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On November 1, 1917, Mr. Watkins enlisted for service in 
the World War and was sent to Jefferson Barracks, and 
later was discharged on account of disability. He re- 
enlisted in August, 1918, and went to Spartansburg, South 
Carolina, where he was attached to the Fifth Anti-Air- 
craft Machine Gun Company. He was sent to France and 
later was transferred to Company D, Three Hundred Fifth 
Field Artillery, Seventy-seventh Division. He was dis- 
charged as a first class private in April, 1919. Mr. Watkins 
then became associated with the Conron Hardware Com- 
pany, as a salesman and in 1920 became cashier of the 
First State Bank & Trust Company. 

On November 2, 1922, Mr. Watkins was united in mar- 
riage with Miss India Dale McMillian, the daughter of 
John A. and Elvie D. (Gasper) McMillian, the former a 
native of Pensylvania and the latter of New York. Mr. 
McMillian is president of the First State Bank & Trust 
Company, Indianola. He is also supervisor of Carroll 
Township. Mrs. McMillian died in April, 1927, and is 
buried at Indianola. Mr. and Mrs. Watkins have a son, 
Ray Allen, born April 6, 1925. 

Mr. Watkins is a Republican, a member of the First 
Congregational Church, and belongs to Vermilion Lodge, 
No. 265, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Past Master 
in 1925; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Gao 
Grotto; Order of Eastern Star; and Knights of Pythias. 



Joseph R. Atkinson. — One of the most substantial 
young men of Sidell is Joseph R. Atkinson, who is serving 
as postmaster. He is also a veteran of the World War. 
Mr. Atkinson was born in Champaign County, Illinois, 
October 8, 1895, the son of Lafayette and Mabel (Rush) 
Atkinson. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 799 

Lafayette Atkinson was born in Virginia in 1855. He 
came to Illinois with his parents when he was ten years 
old and they located on a farm in Champaign County. Mr. 
Atkinson became a successful farmer and was also a car- 
penter by trade. He was a member of the Christian 
Church, and belonged to the Knights of Pythias and Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Atkinson died in 1919 
and is buried at Sidell. His widow, born at Ogden, Illinois, 
lives at Piqua, Ohio. Five children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Atkinson: Joseph R., the subject of this sketch; 
Gladys, married Paul Harlan, lives at Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana; Wilma, deceased; Howard and Gordon, both live at 
Piqua, Ohio. 

The early education of Joseph R. Atkinson was received 
in the public schools of Sidell. Following his graduation 
from Sidell High School in 1914 he attended Eastern Illi- 
nois State Normal College. He taught school until his 
enlistment for service in the World War, May 7, 1918. 
He enlisted in the United States Navy and was sent to 
Great Lakes Naval Training Station, where he remained 
until July 26, 1918. He was then sent to Philadelphia and 
sailed in August for England, where he was active in the 
Queenstown Naval Yards until the close of the war. He 
was later transferred to Liverpool and engaged in per- 
sonnel work. Mr. Atkinson was discharged on June 14, 
1919, as a first class seaman. He resumed his teaching at 
Mount Olive Consolidated School, Edgar County, Illinois, 
and was located there from 1919 until 1923, when he re- 
signed. He became postmaster of Sidell on August 27, 
1923, and was reappointed to office on March 22, 1928. 

On December 24, 1919, Mr. Atkinson was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Helen Blanchard, the daughter of Henry 
and Edith (Fritchie) Blanchard. Mrs. Blanchard lives at 
Sidell. She is the daughter of Amos W. and Mary Jane 
(Taylor) Fritchie, the former a native of Pennsylvania 
and the latter of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson have 



800 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

two children: Julia Mae, born July 27, 1924; and Gerald 
Waldo, born April 30, 1928. 

Mr. Atkinson is a Republican in politics. He is an 
active member of the Christian Church, and belongs to 
Sidell Lodge No. 798, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Modern Woodmen 
of America. He is secretary of the Board of Education, 
Sidell. 



James H. Dyer, of the Vermilion County bar, has had 
a wide and successful practice at Hoopeston for many 
years and is active in the business and civic affairs of that 
community. He was born on a farm in Calloway County, 
Missouri, February 28, 1856. His father, Henry H. Dyer, 
was born in Rutland County, Vermont, April 9, 1831. He 
was married to Sarah J. Wescott, who was born in New 
York City, July 26, 1837. Their marriage took place at 
Mansfield, Ohio, November 22, 1853, where he had a posi- 
tion as teller in the Bank of Mansfield. In 1854 he moved 
from there to Missouri and in 1860 to Colorado, crossing 
the plains by covered wagons. There were then no rail- 
roads west of Omaha. In 1867 he returned from the West 
with his family, again crossing the plains by covered wag- 
ons, accompanying a wagon train with one hundred armed 
men, for protection against the Indians, who were at that 
time in bitter warfare against the white settlers. The cara- 
van camped at night in the sod forts which had been con- 
structed by the Government, about thirty miles apart 
along the trail, from Omaha to the West. While enroute 
they had several skirmishes with the Indians but no serious 
battles. 

Henry H. Dyer located in Chicago and engaged in busi- 
ness there for a time, and later lived in southern Illinois. 
He moved to Hoopeston with his family in 1875, and there 
began the practice of law, in which he was actively en- 




JAMES H. DYER 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 801 

gaged up to the time of his death, which occurred Novem- 
ber 24, 1881. His wife died March 18, 1925, at Creal 
Springs, Illinois, and both parents are buried in Floral 
Hill Cemetery, Hoopeston. There were born to this mar- 
riage, besides the subject of this sketch, three children: 
Susan U., married Lucien E. Griggs; Jennie P., married 
John B. Wallbridge; and Edward N., married May Haines. 
All are now deceased and are buried in Floral Hill Ceme- 
tery, Hoopeston. 

The ancestry of the Dyer family can be traced back in a 
direct line, to William Dyre or Dyer, — spelled both ways 
in documents, who was born in Somersetshire, England, in 
1587. He emigrated to America at about the age of forty 
years and the records of the Colonies show that along with 
eighteen others he founded the town of Portsmouth, Rhode 
Island, March 7, 1638. He was also one of eight English- 
men who founded Newport, Rhode Island, April 28, 1639, 
and he was elected clerk of the new colony. He afterwards 
became first secretary of Rhode Island and later attorney 
general. He died in 1677. Mary Dyer, his wife, is a noted 
character in the early history of the Quakers. She adopted 
that faith and became an active minister of that denomina- 
tion, and as such incurred the enmity of the Government. 
She is described as "a person of comely stature and coun- 
tenance, of a piercing knowledge of many things, and of a 
wonderful sweet and pleasant discourse." She was 
arrested while preaching at Boston and brought to trial 
before Governor Endicott, and being questioned, owned 
herself to be a Quaker, and upon her refusal to desist from 
preaching, she was sentenced to death, and executed June 
1, 1660. The "Friends" records at Portsmouth thus note 
her death: 'Mary Dyer, the wife of William Dyer, of 
Newport, Rhode Island, was put to death at the town of 
Boston with the like cruel hand, as the Martyrs were, in 
Queen Mary's time, upon the first day of the 6th month, 
1660." The occasion of her death aroused so much feeling 

17— Vol. 2 



802 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

in the Colonies that within a year Charles II required the 
abolishment of the death penalty against Quakers. 

James H. Dyer was married October 18, 1877, at 
Hoopeston, to Miss Lillian C. Furness, born March 29, 
1856, at Blackwood, New Jersey. Her father, John D. 
Furness was born in Westmorland County, England, and 
emigrated to America, with other members of the family 
when quite young, residing in Philadelphia. Both par- 
ents died in early life and are buried at Pallatin, Illinois. 
Mrs. Dyer was raised by her aunt, Elizabeth Atkinson, who 
emigrated from England to America in a sailing vessel 
over ninety-six years ago. There were born to this mar- 
riage three children: Louis H., born December 23, 1879, 
Hoopeston; Charles F., born February 25, 1887, Hoopeston, 
captain of Company A, One Hundred and Fourteenth In- 
fantry, Twenty-ninth Division, in the late World War; 
and Lucien B., born October 17, 1889, Hoopeston, captain 
of Company D, Three Hundred and Eleventh Motor Supply 
Train, Eighty-sixth Division, in the late World War. Both 
served in France. 

James H. Dyer has resided in Hoopeston since 1875. 
After finishing high school he graduated from Bryant & 
Stratton's Business College, Chicago, and then commenced 
the study of law in his father's law office, later continuing 
his law studies in the Law Department of Wesleyan Uni- 
versity at Bloomington, Illinois. He was admitted to the 
Bar in 1881, by the Supreme Court of Illinois, and at the 
death of his father, in that year, immediately began the 
active practice of his profession. In 1911, his son, Charles 
F. Dyer, was graduated from the Northwestern University 
Law School and was admitted to the bar, and became a 
member of the law firm of Dyer & Dyer. 

Mr. Dyer served as alderman in the city council for 
eight years, later as mayor, was a member of the school 
board for several years, and was chairman of the Board 
of Instruction, during the World War, also a member of 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 803 

various committees to put over the Liberty Loans, and to 
raise funds for the Red Cross, and other war activities. 
He was instrumental in securing the location of the Car- 
negie Library Building at Hoopeston, and was a member 
of the committee that supervised its construction, and has 
been an active member of the Library Board ever since its 
organization. 

Mr. Dyer has also engaged in other lines of business, 
besides his profession. In 1905, in conjunction with H. C. 
Finley and M. H. Lewis, he organized the Illinois Lumber, 
Grain & Coal Company, with a capital stock of $100,000, 
and was connected with that company as vice president for 
twenty years, disposing of his interest in 1925. In 1919, 
with the late John L. Hamilton and James A. Cunningham, 
he organized the Hoopeston National Bank, with a capital 
of $100,000, and since that time has been vice president of 
that institution. 

Mr. Dyer has helped to permanently improve the busi- 
ness section of the city by constructing several attractive 
business blocks. 

Mr. Dyer is a member of the Commercial Club, Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and the Hubbard Trail Country Club. 
He has a fine law library, and a private library in his home, 
and devotes much of his leisure time to reading. He has 
traveled extensively throughout the United States, also 
has made a tour of the West Indies, and Central America, 
and has traveled widely throughout Europe. 



Capt. Lucien B. Dyer, a veteran of the World War, 
ranks high among the dependable and highly successful 
young business men of Hoopeston, and is a member of one 
of the oldest and best known families of Vermilion County. 
He was born in this city, August 17, 1889, the son of 
James H. and Lillian C. (Furness) Dyer. 



804 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

A complete sketch of James H. Dyer appears elsewhere 
in this history. 

The boyhood of Lucien B. Dyer was spent in Hoopes- 
ton, where he attended the public schools. He was gradu- 
ated from Culver Military Academy in 1908, from Prince- 
ton University in 1912, and spent two years in the Law 
School of Northwestern University, after which he took a 
course of instruction in engineering at the University of 
Illinois. In 1916 Mr. Dyer was one of the incorporators of 
the H. C. Finley Construction Company, Hoopeston, and 
was put in charge of paving work at Catlin, Illinois. He 
was thus engaged at the outbreak of the World War. He 
enlisted April 22, 1917, and returned to Culver Military 
Academy for special instruction, later being enrolled in 
the officers training school at Fort Sheridan, Illinois, where 
he was commissioned a captain of infantry. In Septem- 
ber, 1917, he was assigned to the Eighty-sixth Division at 
Camp Grant, Rockford, Illinois. Later, he became com- 
mander of Company M, Three Hundred and Forty-third 
Infantry, and through his own personal request was trans- 
ferred to Company D, Three Hundred and Eleventh Motor 
Supply Train, as commander. He served in various camps 
throughout the United States and was in charge of am- 
munition truck trains. His outfit sailed for France Oc- 
tober 1, 1918, and he served at Cherbourg, France, where 
he again joined the 86th Division. Captain Dyer was in 
charge of numerous ammunition truck trains that motored 
throughout France. He sailed from France August 6, 
1919, and was discharged from the service. Upon his 
return to Hoopeston Mr. Dyer purchased the interests of 
the Finley Construction Company, which was reorganized 
as the L. B. Dyer Construction Company. He is presi- 
dent of this well known business enterprise. 

In 1923 Mr. Dyer married Miss Frieda Willett, the 
daughter of John Willett, formerly of Hoopeston, now liv- 
ing in Missouri. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 805 

Politically, Mr. Dyer is an independent voter. He is a 
charter member of the American Legion, and belongs to 
the "Forty and Eight" Society, Hubbard Trail Country 
Club, Elm Club of Princeton, and Chamber of Commerce, 
Hoopeston. 



Capt. Charles F. Dyer, World War veteran, is promi- 
nent in legal circles in Hoopeston, where he is a member 
of the law firm of Dyer & Dyer. He was born at Hoopes- 
ton, February 25, 1887, the son of James H. and Lillian C. 
(Furness) Dyer. 

A sketch of James H. Dyer appears elsewhere in this 
history. 

Charles F. Dyer received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of Hoopeston. He is a graduate of Culver Mili- 
tary Academy, University of Illinois, and Law School of 
Northwestern University. He was admitted to the bar in 
1911 and immediately thereafter became identified with 
his father in general practice at Hoopeston, the firm being- 
known as Dyer & Dyer. They have offices in the Willdon 
Building. Mr. Dyer served as city attorney from 1913 
until 1925 and was reappointed to that office in 1929. He 
is also president of the Dealers Finance Company, 
Hoopeston. 

In 1911 Mr. Dyer married Miss Irma L. Miller, the 
daughter of Oscar and Anna C. (Cunningham) Miller. 
The former is deceased and the latter lives at San Diego, 
California. Mr. and Mrs. Dyer have two daughters, Doris 
and Mary. 

In the spring of 1917 Mr. Dyer was commissioned a 
first lieutenant and called into active service May 12, 1917, 
and was assigned to the first officers training camp at Fort 
Sheridan, Illinois. From there he was assigned to the 
Eighty-sixth Division, located at Camp Grant, 111., where 
he was assigned to the Second Battalion of the Three Hun- 



806 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

dred and Forty-second Infantry, as Battalion Adjutant. 
While there he was appointed special judge advocate to try 
several of the Government's most important cases against 
draft deserters. He was later promoted to a captaincy and 
appointed operations and intelligence officer of said regi- 
ment. On September 7, 1918, he sailed for overseas duty 
with this regiment and upon his arrival in France, was as- 
signed to the Twenty-ninth Division and was given com- 
mand of Company A, One Hundred and Fourteenth In- 
fantry. He was discharged from service May 15, 1919 ; re- 
taining a captaincy in the reserve corps, which he still 
holds. 

Mr. Dyer is a Republican, a member of the Universalist 
Church, Vermilion County Bar Association, Commercial 
Club, Chamber of Commerce, and Hubbard Trail Country 
Club. He was one of the organizers of the local post of the 
American Legion, and is past commander. He also be- 
longs to the "40 and 8" Society. 



Wade A. Holton. — One of the representative bankers 
of Vermilion County is found in Wade A. Holton, who is 
president of the First National Bank of Sidell. He was 
born near Sidell, January 24, 1886, the son of Dr. Henry 
C. and Ura A. (Ames) Holton. 

Dr. Henry C. Holton, a prominent physician and sur- 
geon of Sidell, is a native of Indianola, Illinois. He re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools and studied 
at the University of Illinois for one year. He then taught 
in the schools of Vermilion County for ten years, after 
which he read medicine in the office of Doctor Martinie. 
He was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Phila- 
delphia, in 1883, and began the practice of his profession 
at Homer, Illinois. He later was located at Archie, Illinois, 
and since 1887 has engaged in private practice at Sidell. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 807 

Doctor Holton is a Republican, and belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, having been presented with 
the fifty-year jewel by the lodge, and he is also a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the Vermilion 
County Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, and 
American Medical Association. To Doctor and Mrs. Hol- 
ton three children were born: Max, born July 14, 1884, 
who is cashier of the First National Bank, Sidell, married 
Inez Barton, and they have a son, Earl F.; Wade A., the 
subject of this sketch; and Caryl Ames, lives at London, 
Ohio. He married Celia S. Cathcart, and they have two 
sons, William Cathcart and Richard Henry. 

Wade A. Holton attended the public and high schools 
of Sidell and began his business career with the First Na- 
tional Bank of Welettka, Oklahoma, as a bookkeeper. He 
returned to Sidell in 1903 and three years later became 
assistant cashier of the Lyons-Alexander & Company, a 
private banking institution. In October, 1920, Mr. Holton 
was made cashier of the First National Bank of Sidell and 
the following year became president. He is also a director 
of the Sidell Building & Loan Association. 

In 1913 Mr. Holton was united in marriage with Miss 
Charlotte Crew, the daughter of W. R. and Laura (Mc- 
Daniel) Crew, the former a native of England and the 
latter of Illinois. Mr. Crew is deceased and his widow 
lives at Carlinville, Illinois. Charlotte (Crew) Holton died 
in 1919 and is buried at Carlinville. Her son, Kenneth 
Holton, is a student in the Sidell public schools. Mr. Hol- 
ton was married the second time in 1922 to Miss Edith 
Conley, the daughter of Hugh H. and Alice (Saunders) 
Conley, natives of Newport, Indiana, both now deceased. 
Mr. Conley was a Civil War veteran and a successful 
attorney. 

Mr. Holton is a Republican in politics and has served 
as supervisor continuously since April, 1925. He is a mem- 



808 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ber of the Baptist Church, and has the following lodge 
affiliations: Sidell Lodge No. 798, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Past Grand; Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; and Knights of 
Pythias. 



The First National Bank, Sidell, is among the oldest 
and most dependable banking institutions of Vermilion 
County. It was organized as a private bank in 1887 by 
William Lyons, William J. Alexander, Joseph Alexander, 
and William G. Cathcart. It was originally known as 
Lyons- Alexander & Company. In 1907 Mr. Lyons disposed 
of his interests and the bank was thereafter known as 
Alexander & Cathcart. It continued as a private enter- 
prise until 1909, at which time Alexander & Cathcart pur- 
chased the charter and holdings of the First National Bank, 
of Sidell, and following the merger of these two banks the 
name was changed to the First National Bank of Sidell. 

The first officers of the newly organized bank were as 
follows : William G. Cathcart, president ; William J. Alex- 
ander, vice president; John A. Cathcart, cashier; and Wade 
A. Holton, assistant cashier. The directors were: W. G. 
Cathcart, W. J. Alexander, J. A. Cathcart, Anna Cathcart, 
and Harvey Sconce. The bank now has a capital stock of 
twenty-five thousand dollars, and a surplus of twenty-five 
thousand dollars. The present officers are : Wade A. Hol- 
ton, president; John A. Cathcart, vice president; Max C. 
Holton, cashier; and Don C. Lewis, assistant cashier. The 
directors are : Hetty Alexander, Parker W. Bennett, John 
A. Cathcart, Wade A. Holton, and Max C. Holton. 

The statement as of December 31, 1928, follows: Re- 
sources: Loans, $219,340.78; Overdrafts, $141.94; United 
States Bonds, $25,000.00; Other Bonds, Stocks, etc., $22,- 
254.24; Bank Building and Equipment, $6,842.35; Due from 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 809 

United States Treasurer, $1,250.00; Cash and Exchange, 
$84,291.77. Total, $359,121.08. Liabilities: Capital Stock, 
$25,000.00; Surplus, $25,000.00; Undivided Profits, $3,- 
664.94; Reserved for Dividends, $3,750.00; Circulation, 
$25,000.00; Certified Checks, $925.00; Deposits, $275,781.14. 
Total, $359,121.08. 

The First National Bank of Sidell is a member of the 
Vermilion County Federation of the Illinois Bankers Asso- 
ciation and the American Bankers Association. 



Frank G. Anderson, mayor of Allerton, is also one of 
the popular young business men of that place, where he is 
identified with the Anderson & Allen Lumber Company. 
He was born at Allerton, March 16, 1898, the son of Gus 
and Josephine (Brown) Anderson. 

Gus Anderson is a prominent citizen of Allerton. He 
was born in Sweden and was twelve years old when he 
came to this country with his parents. They settled in 
New York and later located at Paxton, Illinois. Mr. An- 
derson became a prosperous farmer of Champaign and 
Vermilion counties and also engaged extensively in the 
grain business. He has been active in the civic and social 
life of Allerton and has lived here retired since 1909. Mr. 
Anderson is a Democrat and has served as road commis- 
sioner and school director. His wife is a native of Indiana. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson two sons were born: Fred, 
farmer, lives at Allerton ; and Frank G., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Frank G. Anderson has always lived at Allerton. After 
his graduation from high school in 1919 he attended the 
University of Illinois. In 1920 he became manager of 
the Harry Allen Grain Company, Allerton, and four years 
later formed a partnership with Ralph Allen, the firm 
being known as the Anderson & Allen Lumber Company. 



810 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

The company owns a large lumber yard at Allerton and 
carries on a large volume of business annually. 

Mr. Anderson is identified with the Republican party 
in politics and has served as mayor of Allerton continu- 
ously since 1923, having been elected to office on four 
successive occasions. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and belongs to Broadlands Lodge No. 791, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, thirty- 
second degree, and Mohammed Temple. Mr. Anderson is 
unmarried. 



Ross Goodwin, popular garage owner of Indianola, 
where he has the agency for the Willys-Knight and Whip- 
pet automobiles, is a native of Vermilion County. He was 
born at Indianola, November 28, 1900, the son of Edward 
and Isabelle (Jackson) Goodwin. 

Edward Goodwin was born at Georgetown, Illinois, and 
his wife is a native of Indianola. For many years he fol- 
lowed general farming and stock raising. He now holds a 
township office. Mr. Goodwin is a Republican, a member 
of the Christian Church, and Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodwin : Hallie, married Claude Williams, lives at India- 
nola; Orpha, married first to Lester Baldwin, and later to 
Thomas Fitzsimmons, lives at Georgetown, Illinois; Mil- 
dred, married Guy Cunningham, lives at Vermilion Grove, 
Illinois; Ross, the subject of this sketch; Edna, married 
Lee Henderson, lives at Indianola; and Ferryl, married 
Rex Bradshaw, lives at Indianola. 

The boyhood of Ross Goodwin was spent at Indianola, 
where he attended the public schools. At an early age he 
became interested in the automobile business and took a 
course in automobile mechanics. He also studied at the 
American School of Aviation, Chicago, and in 1921 estab- 
lished his present business at Indianola. Mr. Goodwin 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 811 

does general repair work and employs four expert mechan- 
ics in his garage. He also deals in automobile accessories 
and is local dealer for the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Com- 
pany. 

On June 16, 1927, Mr. Goodwin was married to Miss 
Laverne Sheppard. 

Politically, Mr. Goodwin is a Republican and he is a 
member of the village board. 



Charles B. Cunningham is among the well known resi- 
dents of Allerton, where he is interested in the hardware 
business, and is also serving as a member of the village 
board and as deputy sheriff of Vermilion County. He is 
a native of Lafayette, Indiana, born September 6, 1875, 
the son of A. J. and Sarah E. (Clark) Cunningham. 

A. J. Cunningham was born at Americus, Indiana, the 
son of Isaac Cunningham, a native of Edinburg, Scotland, 
who was one of the first settlers of Indiana. He was a 
meat packer and rafted his products down the canal to 
Saint Louis and New Orleans, Louisiana. His son, A. J. 
Cunningham, was a graduate of DePauw University, and 
became a successful farmer and stockman. He was a Dem- 
ocrat and served as justice of the peace. He held mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian Church. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Cunningham are deceased and are buried near Lafayette, 
Indiana. They were the parents of four children : Charles 
B., the subject of this sketch; Lawrence Porter, deceased; 
Joseph D., lives at Westville, Illinois; and Pearl D., the 
widow of Fairfax Kirkpatrick, lives at Lafayette, Indiana. 

The boyhood of Charles B. Cunningham was spent at 
Lafayette, Indiana, where he attended the public schools. 
He was graduated from Lafayette High School in 1901 and 
from Purdue University in 1905. He remained on his 
father's farm until 1911, when he came to Allerton and 



812 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

became marshal of the village. Mr. Cunningham has been 
deputy sheriff of Vermilion County for the past twenty 
years and since 1915 has been a member of the village 
board as president of the streets and alleys committee. 
He is interested in business as assistant manager of the 
hardware business of Harry Parish, and has been identified 
with that enterprise since 1911. 

Mr. Cunningham is a Republican, a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, and belongs to Sigma Kappa Phi 
fraternity. 

Throughout his college career Mr. Cunningham was a 
member of the football squads and for three years was a 
member of the varsity football team. He was also a mem- 
ber of the baseball teams. 



William G. Cathcart. — One of the best known and most 
highly esteemed men of Vermilion County was William G. 
Cathcart, prominent business man of Sidell and president 
of the First National Bank. He was born at Natrona, 
Mason County, Illinois, February 8, 1869, and died October 
14, 1920. Mr. Cathcart was the son of John Marshall and 
Sarah J. (Alexander) Cathcart. 

John Marshall Cathcart was born at Pomeroy, County 
Tyrone, Ireland, March 11, 1842. He came to Morgan 
County, Illinois, about 1860 and farmed there for several 
years. He was married November 15, 1866, to Sarah J. 
Alexander, and the family later removed to Mason County, 
Illinois, where Mr. Cathcart became interested in farming 
and the grain business. He went to Nebraska in 1884 but 
three years later returned to Illinois, where he engaged in 
the lumber and grain business. Mr. Cathcart retired in 
1900 and died at Pensacola, Florida, February 21, 1910. 
He was a devout member of the Christian Church through- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 813 

out his life. To Mr. and Mrs. Cathcart were born three 
children: Florence H., who died in May, 1899; William 
G., the subject of this sketch; and John A., a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this history. 

The boyhood of William G. Cathcart was spent on his 
father's farm. He obtained his schooling at Jacksonville, 
Illinois, and in 1884 became associated with his father in 
the live stock business in Nebraska. He returned, how- 
ever, to Illinois in 1887 and became bookkeeper in the First 
National Bank at Paris, Illinois. After six months he re- 
signed and accepted the position as cashier of the private 
bank of Lyons, Alexander & Company, Sidell. In 1907 
Mr. Cathcart, in partnership with his brother, John A. 
Cathcart, purchased Mr. Lyons' interests in the bank, 
which thereafter became known as Alexander & Cathcart. 
On March 1, 1909, the bank was merged with the First Na- 
tional Bank of Sidell, and incorporated as the First Na- 
tional Bank. Mr. Cathcart became president and held that 
office until the date of his death. He was also the owner 
of three thousand acres of land in Ohio and one thousand 
five hundred acres in Illinois, and ranked among the 
largest land owners in this section of the State. 

On June 12, 1890, Mr. Cathcart was united in marriage 
with Miss Anna Sconce, the daughter of James S. and 
Emma (Sowdewsky) Sconce, natives of Indianola, Illinois. 
Mr. Sconce died in 1888 and his widow lives at Sidell. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cathcart were the parents of a daughter, Celia. 
She is the wife of C. A. Holton, of London, Ohio, and they 
have two sons: William Cathcart, born May 27, 1923; 
and Richard Henry, born March 17, 1926. 

Mr. Cathcart was a life long Republican and held the 
office of mayor of Sidell for a number of years. He was 
an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
served as Sunday School superintendent for a period of 
seven years. He was affiliated with Sidell Lodge No. 798, 



814 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, No. 182; Chicago Consistory, thirty- 
second degree; and Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332. 



Forrest A. Dicks. — One of the outstanding young busi- 
ness men of Allerton is well known as a general merchant. 
He was born at Broadlands, Illinois, November 11, 1900, 
the son of Dr. Thomas A. and Mary Harriet (Thompson) 
Dicks. 

Dr. Thomas A. Dicks is a native of Indiana. He is a 
graduate of the Kansas City Medical College and through- 
out his professional career has engaged in practice at 
Broadlands, where he resides. He is a Republican, active 
in local politics, and holds membership in the United Breth- 
ren Church. He is affiliated with Broadlands Lodge 
No. 791, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Con- 
sistory, thirty-second degree; Champaign County Med- 
ical Society; Illinois State Medical Society; and American 
Medical Association. Doctor and Mrs. Dicks are the par- 
ents of the following children: Arch, who died in 1922, 
was a veteran of the World War, having served as second 
lieutenant in the United States Aviation Section; Hazel, 
deceased; Hilma, married LeRoy I. Hobbs, lives at Dan- 
ville; Carl, lives at Broadlands, Illinois; Forrest A., the 
subject of this sketch; and Kenneth, lives at Broadlands. 

Forrest A. Dicks grew up at Broadlands, where he re- 
ceived his early education. He was graduated from In- 
dianapolis (Indiana) High School in 1919, spent two years 
at the University of Illinois, and in 1922 was graduated 
from Worshams School of Embalming. He then purchased 
an interest in his brother's hardware business at Broad- 
lands and established an undertaking establishment in con- 
nection with it. He has remained as a partner in this 
business although he has devoted most of his time to his 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 815 

store at Allerton since 1928, which was purchased from 
Bert Downey. It is one of the largest stores of its type 
in the county and carries a complete line of high grade 
merchandise. 

In 1925 Mr. Dicks married Miss Mary Kitchen, the 
daughter of Harvey and Lou (Fenley) Kitchen, natives 
of Indiana and Illinois. They are residents of Danville. 

Mr. Dicks is a member of the Methodist Church; Broad- 
lands Lodge No. 791, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Danville Consistory, 32nd degree; Gao Grotto; Modern 
Woodmen of America; Delta Sigma Phi and Omega Beta 
Pi fraternities. Politically, he is a Republican. 



Chester M. Baum, of Indianola, ranks as one of the lead- 
ing and most successful stock feeders of Vermilion Coun- 
ty. He was born in Carroll Township, Vermilion County, 
August 15, 1889, the son of Wimm C. and Fiona (Molt) 
Baum. 

Wimm C. Baum was born in Carroll Township, Ver- 
milion County, and spent his entire life in that section. 
He became one of the most prosperous farmers and cattle 
feeders in that section. He died in 1922 and is buried in 
Woodlawn Cemetery, Indianola. His widow, born at Fair- 
field, Illinois, lives at Indianola. Mr. Baum was a Repub- 
lican. There were three children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Baum: Belle, married Samuel Baldwin, lives at Indianola; 
Nell, lives at Indianola; and Chester M., the subject of 
this sketch. 

Chester M. Baum received his education in the district 
schools of Carroll Township, Vermilion County. At an 
early age he became identified with the cattle feeding busi- 
ness and for several years was associated with his father. 
After the latter's death Mr. Baum took over his father's 
interests. He is the largest cattle feeder in this section 



816 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

of the State and also is well known as a general farmer. 
Mr. Baum ships his stock from Texas and Mexico and 
also buys there for local cattle feeders. 

In 1909 Mr. Baum was united in marriage with Miss 
Nora Helen Gibbs, the daughter of Albert H. and Mary 
(Dye) Gibbs, the former a native of Iowa and the latter of 
Illinois. Mr. Gibbs lives at Indianola. His wife died in 
1913 and is buried at Indianola. To Mr. and Mrs. Baum 
have been born three children: Helen, Catherine, and 
Wimm C., all students. 

Mr. Baum is a Republican. He is a member of India- 
nola' Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge 
of Perfection, and Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332. 



Dale Wallace, retired, is a highly esteemed pioneer 
citizen of Hoopeston, where he has been a resident for 
more than half a century. He was born at LaPorte, Indi- 
ana, November 5, 1849, the son of Dr. John Porter and 
Lydia Ann (Winchell) Wallace. 

Dr. John Porter Wallace was born in Steuben County, 
New York, and his wife was a native of Rush County, 
Indiana. He was a graduate of Bath (New York) Semi- 
nary and after leaving school went to LaPorte, Indiana, 
where he remained for several years before locating at 
New Salem, Indiana. He became a successful merchant 
and also served as postmaster. He subsequently read medi- 
cine under Doctor Carley and after completing his course 
practiced at New Salem for a time in connection with his 
mercantile business. In 1855 Doctor Wallace removed to 
West Union, Fayette County, Iowa, where he established 
Round Grove Academy, and he was connected with this in- 
stitution as president. Later, he lived at Kirksville, Mis- 
souri, and was superintendent of schools at that place. He 
entered the real estate business at Garden City, Kansas, 



DALE WALLACE 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 817 

and was living there at the time of his death. His wife is 
also deceased. Doctor Wallace was a Republican and a 
devout member of the Christian Church. To Doctor and 
Mrs. Wallace were born three children: Dale, the subject 
of this sketch; Evangeline St. Clair, born in 1855, married 
William S. Moore, both deceased; and Grant, deceased. 

Dale Wallace was educated in the Round Grove Acad- 
emy at West Union, Iowa. Early in life he learned the 
printer's trade, later was employed at Cedar Falls and 
ElDora, Iowa, and in 1869 went to Marysville, California, 
later locating in San Francisco. In 1870 he went to Port- 
land, Oregon, but the following year returned to Iowa, and 
in October, 1871, located at Hoopeston, where he estab- 
lished the North Vermilion Chronicle, on January 10, 1872, 
of which he was publisher and editor. In 1873 the paper 
became known as the Hoopeston Chronicle. The plant was 
originally located on North Market Street, across from the 
park. In 1876 it was removed to the basement of the First 
National Bank Building. Through the efforts and per- 
sonality of Mr. Wallace the Hoopeston Chronicle became 
one of the leading newspapers of Vermilion County. The 
plant was leased in 1882 to Charles W. Warner and two 
years later Mr. Wallace retired from the publishing busi- 
ness and entered the real estate, insurance and loan busi- 
ness, which he successfully conducted until his retirement 
in 1911. 

In 1878 Mr. Wallace was united in marriage with Miss 
Lucy Viola Webb, the daughter of Chamberlain and Betsy 
Ann (Weber) Webb, the former a native of Pennsylvania 
and the latter of Ohio. Both are deceased. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Wallace were born four children: 1. Mac Cloyes, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this history. 2. Irma 
St. Clair, deceased, was the wife of Dr. L. B. Russell, phy- 
sician, Hoopeston, and they had two daughters, Elizabeth 
and Irma. 3. Lucy Dale, married J. Mitchell Thorsen, 
lives at Bronxville, New York, where he is identified with 

18— Vol. 2 



818 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

the insurance business of Thorsen & Thorsen, Incorpor- 
ated. They have four children: Dale, Elizabeth, J. Wal- 
lace, Pollyann, and Patricia. 4. Forrest Webb, general 
manager of William A. Wise Publishing Company, Scars- 
dale, New York. He married Mabel Harden, and they 
have a son, Jerry. 

Mr. Wallace is a Republican. He served as postmaster 
of Hoopeston, being appointed by President Hayes in 1877 
and reappointed by President Chester A. Arthur, in 1881. 
He is affiliated with Star Lodge No. 709, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; Royal Arch Chapter; Mount Olivet 
Commandery, Knights Templar; Modern Woodmen of 
America; and Commercial Club. 

In 1905 Mr. Wallace built a beautiful summer home at 
Waupaca, Wis., on the chain of lakes called the Killarney 
of Wisconsin. It is there that he spends his summers and 
delights in his favorite recreation, fishing. 



Mac Cloyes Wallace. — One of the enterprising and suc- 
cessful business men of Hoopeston is Mr. Wallace, who is 
identified with the Mac C. Wallace Insurance Agency. He 
was born in this city, January 22, 1880, the son of Dale 
and Lucy Viola (Webb) Wallace. 

A complete sketch of Dale Wallace appears elsewhere 
in this history. 

The early education of Mac C. Wallace was obtained in 
the public schools of Hoopeston. Following his graduation 
from Michigan Military Academy in 1899 he returned to 
Hoopeston and entered the First National Bank. He sub- 
sequently became assistant cashier but in May, 1905, re- 
signed to enter his father's business. In 1911 Mr. Wallace 
purchased the interests of his father in the real estate and 
insurance business and in 1918 purchased the interests of 
Mr. Catherwood, the firm originally being known as Cath- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 819 

erwood & Wallace. Mr. Wallace is recognized as a lead- 
ing insurance operator of this section. He has offices in 
the First National Bank Building. 

On June 15, 1904, Mr. Wallace married Miss Irene Mil- 
dred Wilson, the daughter of Joseph and Mildred (John- 
son) Wilson. Mr. Wilson, a native of England, died in 
1902. His wife, born in Indiana, died in 1921. Both are 
buried at Neoga, Illinois. Mr. Wilson was one of the first 
graduates of Wabash College. To Mr. and Mrs. Wallace 
were born two children: Natalie, born April 29, 1905, 
married Theodore I. Merseles, broker, lives at Bronxville, 
New York; and Dale II, born September 9, 1907, a stu- 
dent at Dartmouth College. 

Mr. Wallace is a Republican, a member of Star Lodge 
No. 709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Royal Arch 
Chapter; Lions Club; Hubbard Trail Country Club; Com- 
mercial Club; and Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Wallace is a director of the First National Bank, 
Hoopeston, and secretary of the North Vermilion Loan and 
Saving Association. 



William C. Hunt, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil 
War and one of the most prominent and highly esteemed 
citizens of Vermilion County. He was born at Mount 
Vernon, Ohio, February 15, 1839, and died April 4, 1929. 
Mr. Hunt was the son of Richard and Nancy (Colopy) 
Hunt, natives of Ohio, where they lived and died. 

Richard Hunt was a local politician, and he died in 
1854, his wife having preceded him in death in 1846. He 
was the son of Jonathan Hunt, who was born in New Jer- 
sey in 1780, and his wife was a native of West Virginia, 
born January 9, 1782. Their marriage took place in 1804 r 
and two years later they came to Ohio and settled in Pleas- 
ant Township, Knox County. Mr. Hunt was a wagon- 
maker and gunsmith. He cleared the land in his new home 



820 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and became a close friend of the Indians, who still lived 
in that section of Ohio. During the War of 1812 he served 
under Major Kratzer. In 1815 he was licensed to keep a 
tavern in Knox County, Ohio. Both he and his wife are 
buried in Hunt Cemetery, Hunt's Station, near Mount 
Vernon, Ohio. The children of Richard Hunt were: Cecilia 
Carter; Matilda Carter; Emily Warthen; Mary Rhodes; 
Honor, dying in infancy; William C, the subject of this 
sketch; George, a sketch of whom appears below; Ira D., 
and Richard J. 

William C. Hunt attended the district schools of Ohio, 
and after the death of his father, in 1855, he came to Illi- 
nois. The trip was made on horesback and Mr. Hunt set- 
tled near Donkey's Point, near the present site of Kansas 
Station. He worked on a farm during the summer months 
and attended school during the winter session. At the 
age of twenty-two years he enlisted for service in the Civil 
War, in April, 1861. He became a private in Company 
"C", Twelfth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was soon 
promoted to first lieutenant. He took an active part in 
the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Iuka, At- 
lanta, Jonesboro, and Altoona Pass. He was also with 
General Sherman on his famous march to the sea and took 
part in the grand parade in honor of President Lincoln, 
Mr. Hunt was discharged on July 16, 1865, having served 
throughout the entire war period with only one week of 
sick leave. Upon his return to Illinois he resumed his 
farming activities, and was thus engaged for several years, 
being a successful and prosperous farmer. He retired from 
the farm in 1903 and moved to Allerton, Illinois, where 
he resided until his death. 

On February 20, 1872, Mr. Hunt was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Elizabeth Lowther, who died December 
30, 1916. Both are buried in Fairfield Cemetery, Newman, 
Illinois. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hunt: 
Gertrude, deceased; Harry, lives at Stuttgart, Arkansas; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 821 

Jessie H. Anderson, lives at Allerton; and Dolly, deceased. 
Mr. Hunt was very active in politics and took an inter- 
est in all things for the betterment of the community. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Grand 
Army of the Republic, and Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He was the last surviving Civil War veteran of 
Allerton, and was familiarly known in the community as 
"Uncle Bill." 



George Hunt served as County Superintendent of 
Schools in Edgar County, Illinois. He was admitted to 
practice law in 1869, and in 1875 was elected State Senator. 
In 1885 he was elected Attorney General, and served three 
terms in Illinois State Senate. 

He conducted the prosecution of Chicago Anarchists 
when their case was carried through the Illinois and 
United States Supreme Courts, and eventually secured 
their conviction. He also was concerned in the injunction 
proceedings against the Old Harlem race tracks. It was 
during his term of office that the contest arose with Illinois 
Central Railroad Company for possession of lake fronts, 
and it has been frequently said his efforts saved the lake 
front for the city. In 1893 he moved to Chicago where he 
confined himself almost exclusively to practice of law. 

He died March 17, 1901, and is buried in Oak Ridge 
Cemetery at Springfield, Illinois. His widow resides at 
Winnetka, Illinois, with her daughter, Mrs. C. C. Adams. 



Ralph B. Allen. — One of the representative young 
business men of Vermilion County is found in Ralph B. 
Allen, who is manager of the Harry Allen Grain Company, 
of Allerton. He was born here, December 23, 1899, the son 
of Harry and Alice (Brown) Allen. 



822 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Harry Allen was born in Staffordshire, England, in 
1866 and was fourteen years of age when his family came 
to this country and settled on a farm in Sidell Township, 
Vermilion County. He made several trips to England and 
became widely known as an importer of Shorthorn cattle 
and Shropshire sheep. He was also engaged in farming, 
with his brothers and father. In 1896 Mr. Allen became in- 
terested in the grain business at Allerton with Gus Ander- 
son. Later, he purchased Mr. Anderson's share in the 
business and has since been the owner of one of the largest 
grain businesses in this section. The elevator is located 
on the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. Mr. Allen 
also owns an elevator at Broadlands and is the proprietor 
of the original elevator of Henry Eversole at that place. 
He is a Republican, a member of the Methodist Church, 
and has the following lodge affiliations : Broadlands Lodge 
No. 791, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Newman 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Tuscola Council, Royal and 
Select Masters; Tuscola Commandery, Knights Templar; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Mohammed 
Temple; and Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen live at Broadlands. They have three children : Cecil, 
married Norman E. Westfield, lives in Chicago; Harry 
Kenneth, a graduate of the University of Illinois, and 
veteran of the World War, married lone Walkup, and they 
have a daughter, Mary Ann; and Ralph B., the subject of 
this sketch. 

Ralph B. Allen received his early education in the public 
schools of Broadlands and after his graduation from high 
school in 1919 he entered the University of Illinois, from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
1923. He served as a member of the Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps at the University for four years and received 
the commission of second lieutenant of the Infantry Re- 
serve Corps. He is now a first lieutenant of the United 
States Reserve Corps. Throughout his business career 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 823 

Mr. Allen has been associated with his father's grain in- 
terests and has served as manager of the Harry Allen 
Grain Company at Allerton since his graduation from col- 
lege. He became associated with Frank G. Anderson in 
1924 and they are leading lumber dealers of this section, 
their firm being known as the Anderson-Allen Lumber 
Company. 

Mr. Allen is a Republican, a member of the Metho- 
dist Church, and belongs to Broadlands Lodge No. 791, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Master in 1929-30; 
Newman Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Danville Consis- 
tory, thirty-second degree ; Gao Grotto ; Modern Woodmen 
of America ; and Delta Sigma fraternity. 



Clifford C. Simpson, who is secretary of the Chamber 
of Commerce, Danville, is a veteran of the World War, and 
is well and favorably known among the energetic young 
men of Vermilion County. He was born at Rincon, New 
Mexico, November 15, 1899, the son of Benjamin V. and 
Dora E. (Wadhams) Simpson. 

Benjamin V. Simpson was born near Glasgow, Scotland. 
He spent the greater part of his life in Kansas and was a 
civil engineer on the Santa Fe Railroad. He died in Feb- 
ruary, 1900, and is buried at Everst, Kansas. His widow 
has spent her entire life at Sabetha, where she still resides. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Simpson were born four children: Mrs. 
George Beyer, lives at Sabetha, Kansas; William, lives at 
Horton, Kansas; James, lives at Elgin, Illinois; and Clifford 
C, the subject of this sketch. 

Clifford C. Simpson attended the public schools of 
Sabetha, Kansas, and following his graduation from high 
school entered Nebraska University. He later attended 
the University of Illinois. Mr. Simpson began his business 
career as a salesman but soon became identified with the 



824 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Chamber of Commerce at Sycamore, Illinois, and was later 
associated with the same organization at Sterling, Illinois, 
before locating at Danville in 1928. 

On June 5, 1923, Mr. Simpson was united in marriage 
with Miss Elizabeth Beyer, of Morton, Illinois, the daugh- 
ter of Frank and Lena (Zobrist) Beyer, natives of Illinois 
and Switzerland, respectively. Mr. Beyer died March 5, 
1927, and his widow lives at Morton, Illinois. Mr. and 
Mrs. Simpson have two daughters, Dorothy and Elizabeth. 

Mr. Simpson is a member of the Methodist Church, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Pi Kappa Phi 
fraternity, American Legion, and "40 and 8 Society." He 
is also identified with the National Association of Commer- 
cial Organizations Secretaries. 

During the World War Mr. Simpson volunteered for 
service. He enlisted in the army from the University of 
Nebraska and was assigned to Camp Zachary Taylor, in 
Kentucky. He was commissioned second lieutenant and 
was serving as such at Camp Zachary Taylor when the war 
ended. 



William J. Alexander, deceased, was prominently iden- 
tified with the business, social, and civic life of Sidell, where 
he was vice president of the First National Bank. He was 
born in County Tyrone, Ireland, February 11, 1833, the 
son of James and Letitia (Marshal) Alexander. Both 
James Alexander and his wife, natives of Ireland, are 
deceased. 

William J. Alexander was educated in the common 
schools of his native land and in 1854 came to the United 
States. He settled first at Peoria, Illinois, where he re- 
mained for six months, and afterward removed to Jackson- 
ville, Illinois, where he was employed by his uncle on a 
farm. While there he gained the necessary knowledge of 
farming and cattle raising and in 1865 purchased a farm 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 825 

of one hundred and sixty acres in Mason County, Illinois. 
A few years later he purchased three hundred and twenty 
acres in Logan County, west of Lincoln, Illinois. While in 
Mason County, Mr. Alexander, in partnership with his 
brother-in-law, Mr. Cathcart, purchased large tracts of 
land, which they successfully operated. In 1872 he pur- 
chased a section and a half of land on the Broadland Tract, 
Champaign County, Illinois, and removed there in 1873. 
He remained there until 1905. Mr. Alexander had also 
purchased four hundred and eighty acres while a resident 
in that section and in 1896 purchased over a section of 
land in Page and Freemont counties, Iowa. He became 
one of the founders of the oldest bank in Sidell in 1887 in 
partnership with William Lyons, Joseph Alexander, and 
W. G. Cathcart, the institution being known as Lyons- 
Alexander & Company. In 1907 Mr. Lyons disposed of his 
interests and the bank was then known as Alexander & 
Cathcart until 1909, when the First National Bank was 
merged with the bank of Alexander & Cathcart. At that 
time Mr. Alexander became vice president and served in 
that capacity until his death, which occurred February 29, 
1924. At the time of his death Mr. Alexander was the 
owner of a tract of five thousand acres in Alberta, Canada, 
seven hundred acres near Broadlands, Illinois, and eight 
hundred acres near Marion, Ohio. He had also purchased 
a large ranch near High River, Canada, in 1905 but due to 
ill health had been forced to dispose of it a number of 
years ago. 

In 1905 Mr. Alexander married Miss Hetty Kyle, a 
native of County Tyrone, Ireland, the daughter of Robert 
and Hester (Cathcart) Kyle. The Kyle family emigrated 
to Ontario, Canada, about 1884. Mr. Kyle died in 1912 and 
his wife died in 1928. Both are buried at Dresden, Ontario, 
Canada. 

Mr. Alexander was a Republican and a member of the 
Christian Church. He was a man highly esteemed in his 



826 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

community and always gave in abundance to all worthy 
causes. His widow continues to carry on the philanthropic 
spirit that was his and is among the most charming women 
in the community. 



Adam P. Eaton, owner of the A. P. Eaton Grain Com- 
pany, is a progressive and well known business man of 
Allerton. He was born in Vance Township, Vermilion 
County, April 26, 1883, the son of David and Rachael 
(Reffett) Eaton. 

David Eaton, who lives retired at Mentone, Indiana, is 
a native of Indiana. He spent his early life as a farmer in 
Vance Township, Vermilion County, and later owned land 
in Sidell Township. He removed to Mentone, Indiana, in 
1911, and purchased two hundred acres of land in that sec- 
tion, which he still owns. Mr. Eaton is a Democrat, a 
member of the Presbyterian Church, and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. The following children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Eaton: George, lives at Rileysburg, In- 
diana; Charles, lives at Mentone, Indiana; Harvey, de- 
ceased; Bert, lives at Pence, Indiana; William, lives at 
Ames, Iowa; Adam P., the subject of this sketch; Clara, 
deceased, was a twin sister of Adam P. ; Florence, married 
Ralph Green, lives at Alberta, Canada; Nellie, married 
William Plumber, lives at Elkhart, Indiana; and Daisy, 
married M. Bender, lives at Elkhart, Indiana. 

Adam P. Eaton was reared and educated in Sidell 
Township, and following his graduation from Allerton 
High School in 1901 he engaged in farming. He came to 
Allerton in 1905 and entered the employ of the Allerton 
Grain Company as manager. In 1917 he purchased a farm 
near Tuscola, Illinois, where he spent one year. He then 
returned to Allerton and in October, 1918, went to Jamaica, 
Illinois, as manager of the Farmers Elevator until 1926, 
when he returned to Allerton and purchased the Allerton 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 827 

Grain Company. The business has since been known as 
the A. R. Eaton Grain Company. Mr. Eaton is also vice 
president of the Daines Sales & Manufacturing Company. 

Mr. Eaton was married in 1912 to Miss May Pugh, the 
daughter of E. K. and Lilly (Thompson) Pugh, of Allerton. 
They have a daughter, Vivian, born in 1918. 

Politically, Mr. Eaton is a Republican. He was elected 
supervisor in 1922 and served for two years and has also 
been school director and judge of elections. He is affiliated 
with Fairmount Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Mo- 
hammed Temple. He is also a member of the Farm Bu- 
reau of Vermilion County. 



Dr. Arthur Ernest Dale, of Danville, is outstanding as 
one of the leading surgeons of Vermilion County. He is 
a native of Illinois, born at McLeansboro, December 20, 
1881, the son of Dr. M. C. and Amanda M. (Eddington) 
Dale. 

Dr. M. C. Dale, deceased, was prominent for more than 
half a century as a successful physician and surgeon of 
McLeansboro, Illinois. He was born on a farm near that 
place in 1850 and received his early schooling in the dis- 
trict schools. He was graduated from Northwestern Uni- 
versity Medical School with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1874 and immediately took up his practice at Mc- 
Leansboro, where he continued for a period of fifty-four 
years. He died in October, 1928, and his wife died in 1925. 
Both are buried at McLeansboro. Doctor Dale was a Re- 
publican and a member of the Baptist Church. He held 
membership in the Hamilton County Medical Society, Illi- 
nois State Medical Society, and American Medical Associa- 
tion. He served as surgeon for the Louisville & Nashville 
Railroad. To Doctor and Mrs. Dale were born four chil- 



828 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

dren: Dr. Omar E., physician and surgeon, Connersville, 
Indiana, graduate of Barnes Medical College, served as a 
first lieutenant in the Spanish-American War; Dr. Harry 
W., eye, ear, nose and throat specialist, Chicago Heights, 
Illinois, a graduate of Northwestern University, served as 
a captain in the United States Medical Corps during the 
World War; Arthur Ernest, the subject of this sketch; and 
Ada, married Frank Weltner, who is identified with the 
Weltner Conservatory of Music, Saint Louis, Missouri. 

Arthur Ernest Dale spent his boyhood at McLeans- 
boro, Illinois, and after his graduation from high school 
in 1900 he entered the University of Illinois, where he took 
pre-medic work. He received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1907 from Northwestern University, and 
served as interne in the Baptist Hospital, Chicago, in 1907- 
08, and in Saint Elizabeth Hospital, Danville, from April, 
1908, until 1909. He then established offices in this city 
in the Temple Building, where he has met with marked 
success as a specialist and surgeon. Doctor Dale has 
taken graduate work in England, France and Germany, 
and has attended clinics throughout the United States. 
He is a member of the surgical staffs of Lakeview and 
Saint Elizabeth hospitals, Danville, and is surgeon for the 
Wabash Railroad, Vermilion County Telephone Company, 
and Danville Brick Company. 

In 1912 Doctor Dale was united in marriage with Miss 
Edna B. Johnson, the daughter of George and Dessie John- 
son, natives of Illinois, both now deceased. They have no 
children. 

Doctor Dale is a Republican, a member of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and has the following club 
affiliations: Olive Branch Lodge, No. 38, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; Ansar Temple; Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, No. 332; Rotary Club; Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica; Danville Country Club; Chamber of Commerce; and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 829 

Omega Epsilon Phi fraternity. He served as president 
of the Vermilion County Medical Society in 1918, and is 
a member of the Illinois Medical Society, American Med- 
ical Association, Aesculapian Medical Society, and is a fel- 
low of the American College of Surgeons. 



Melvin Leo Hole, M. D., who is among the most suc- 
cessful of the younger physicians and surgeons of Dan- 
ville, is a veteran of the World War. He was born at 
Hutchinson, Kansas, August 5, 1888, the son of Dr. Oliver 
C. and Lucy (Castle) Hole. 

Dr. Oliver C. Hole was born at Ridge Farm, Illinois, 
July 28, 1859, the son of Dr. Jonah and Margaret (Rice) 
Hole. Jonah Hole was a leading dentist at Ridge Farm 
and Metcalf, Illinois. Both he and his wife are deceased 
and are buried at Ridge Farm. Their son, Oliver C, was 
reared and educated at Ridge Farm. He was a telegrapher 
early in life and was employed in Indiana and later be- 
came express messenger at Hutchinson, Kansas. Subse- 
quently, he attended the University of Iowa and was later 
graduated from Temple University, Philadelphia, with the 
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. He practiced at Dan- 
ville for many years and retired in 1922. His death 
occurred January 22, 1925, and he is buried at Ridge Farm. 
His widow lives in this city. Doctor Hole was a Repub- 
lican and a member of the Methodist Church. The three 
children born to Doctor and Mrs. Hole were : Melvin Leo, 
the subject of this sketch; Mary Laverne, married Harold 
Sheffield, lives at Florida City, Florida; and Margaret 
Louise, married Robert Hartman, lives in Chicago. 

Melvin Leo Hole attended the public schools of Dan- 
ville and was graduated from Danville High School in 
1907. He then entered Northwestern University, from 
which he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 



830 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

1911. He served as interne in the Metropolitan Hospital, 
New York City, in 1911-13, and spent five months as ship's 
surgeon in New York for the Quebec Steamship Company, 
running from New York to British Guinea. In Septem- 
ber, 1913, Doctor Hole came to Danville, where he engaged 
in practice with Dr. Stephen C. Glidden until 1916. He 
then established a private practice. In December, 1917, 
he volunteered for service in the World War and was sent 
to Fort Riley, Kansas, with the rank of first lieutenant. 
In June, 1918, he was transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa, 
and in September of that year sailed for France with Base 
Hospital No. 88 as detachment commander. He was located 
at Langres, France. He was discharged in August, 1919, 
with the rank of captain. Upon his return to Danville, 
Doctor Hole resumed his practice with offices in the Tem- 
ple Building. He is a member of the staffs of Lakeview 
and Saint Elizabeth's hospitals, and is surgeon for the 
Illinois Terminal Railway System, and medical examiner 
for the Aeronautics Branch of the Department of Com- 
merce. 

In 1916 Doctor Hole was united in marriage with Miss 
Inez Gass, the daughter of Levin W. and Eva (Hulce) 
Gass, natives of Illinois. He is deceased and his widow 
lives at Danville. To Doctor and Mrs. Hole have been 
born three children: Inez Marie, John Levin, and Mary 
Louise. 

Politically, Doctor Hole is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of St. James Methodist Episcopal Church; Anchor 
Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Con- 
sistory, thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple; Gao Grotto; 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; and 
American Legion. 

Doctor Hole is identified with the Vermilion County 
Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, Illinois Industrial Medical and Sur- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 831 

gery Society, and American Railway Surgeons Associa- 
tion. He is also a Fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons. 



Thurman D. Allen is a leading figure in the business 
and commercial life of Danville, where he is president of 
the Allen Electric Company, 23 West North Street. He 
was born at Greencastle, Indiana, March 13, 1870, the son 
of William D. and Jennie (Hoar) Allen. 

William D. Allen, who died in 1876, was a native of 
Kentucky. His wife was born at Providence, Rhode 
Island. She died in 1891. Mr. Allen was an early settler 
of Greencastle, Indiana, where he was interested in the 
banking business. He also served as mayor of that city. 
He was a Democrat. During the Civil War Mr. Allen 
invested his entire fortune in gold and eventually lost 
everything he possessed. There were three children in 
the Allen family : William T. Fletcher, who died in Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, in February, 1929; Mary F., the widow 
of 0. A. McFarland, who died in 1916, and she lives at 
Danville ; and Thurman D., the subject of this sketch. 

Thurman D. Allen grew up in Greencastle, Indiana, 
where he was educated. He was graduated from DePauw 
University in 1891 and spent the following two years at 
Cornell University, where he studied electrical engineer- 
ing. He then located in Chicago, where he was employed 
by the Chicago Edison Company, now the Commonwealth 
Edison Company. After a year he came to Danville and 
was connected with the Danville Street Railway & Light 
Company in construction work. The next year he became 
a partner in the firm of Aylesworth & Allen, electrical con- 
tractors, located at 4 East North Street. This firm con- 
tinued in business for about ten years, when Mr. Allen 
purchased the interests of Mr. Aylesworth in 1907. He 
then organized the Allen Electric Company at 14 East 



832 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

North Street. Three years later the business was moved 
to 23 West North Street, which is the present location. 
The company are general contractors and carry a com- 
plete line of electrical supplies. They are also dealers in 
radios. 

In April, 1897, Mr. Allen married Miss Viola Beck, of 
Danville, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Beck, 
natives of Indiana, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen have no children. 

Mr. Allen is a Republican, attends the Presbyterian 
Church, and is affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty- 
second degree; Gao Grotto; Mohamet Temple Shrine, 
Peoria, Illinois; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
He is also a member of the Danville Country Club and 
Kiwanis Club, having served as president of both of these 
organizations. 



Capt. Alba Cornelius Honeywell Cromer, who is a vet- 
eran of the World War, is one of the most prominent and 
influential citizens of Hoopeston, being a member of one of 
the oldest and best known families of this section. He 
was born at Hoopeston, October 5, 1884, the son of John 
Calvin and Estella (Honeywell) Cromer. 

A complete sketch of the Honeywell family appears 
elsewhere in this history with the biography of Alba 
Honeywell. 

Alba C. Honeywell Cromer received his early schooling 
in the public schools of Hoopeston, from which he was 
graduated in 1900. He spent four years at the University 
of Illinois. In 1903 he assumed charge of the vast estate 
of Alba Honeywell, his grandfather, who was failing in 
health. At the death of Mr. Honeywell in 1916 Mr. Cromer 
assumed complete charge of the estate as executor. 




CAPT. ALBA C. H. CROMER 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 833 

At the outbreak of the World War Mr. Cromer re- 
ceived a commission as first lieutenant and was sent to 
Rockford, Illinois, as an instructor. He was later assigned 
to a supply train and went to the east coast. Later, how- 
ever, he was sent to France with the Three Hundred and 
Eleventh Supply Train, Black Hawk, or Eighty-sixth Divi- 
sion. He was promoted to the rank of captain and after 
the close of the war made an extensive tour of Europe. He 
was discharged in October, 1919, from Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Mr. Cromer then became interested in the Automobile 
Finance Company, of Indianapolis, Indiana, as secretary 
and treasurer, later becoming president. Subsequently he 
went to Chicago and purchased a seat on the Chicago Board 
of Trade. His next business connection was with the 
Hardinge Oil Burner Company. 

Mr. Cromer is a Republican, a member of the Uni- 
versalist Church, American Legion, and Sigma Upsilon 
fraternity. He is also affiliated with Star Lodge No. 709, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 



Robert H. Swift, able chief of police in Danville, is 
widely known throughout Vermilion County. He was 
born at North Vernon, Indiana, June 24, 1867, the son of 
Samuel C. and Olive (Starling) Swift. 

Samuel C. Swift, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil 
War. He was born in Pennsylvania and as a boy learned 
the carpenter trade. He enlisted in the army during the 
Civil War when he was eighteen years old and served 
throughout the entire war as a member of the Sixty-sixth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded in battle but 
continued in active service nevertheless. After the close of 
the war, Mr. Swift removed to North Vernon, Indiana, 
where he engaged in the building and contracting busi- 
ness. He was among the early settlers of Danville and 

19__Vol. 2 



834 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

for many years was identified with the building interests 
of Elden T. and Charles J. Palmer, as well as with Cap- 
tain Frazier. He served as a member of the first volun- 
teer fire department, which was located on North Ver- 
milion Street. Mr. Swift was connected with the build- 
ing of the coal mining housing section at Grape Creek, 
Illinois, until about 1913, when he retired and lived at 510 
North Washington Street, Danville. He died in 1924 at 
the age of eighty-one years and is buried in Atherton 
Cemetery, Danville. His wife, born at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
died in 1925. Mr. and Mrs. Swift were the parents of five 
children: George, died in infancy; Robert H., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Clyde E., lives at Danville; Clara, the 
widow of David Komyathy, lives at Danville; and Albert 
H., who met with an accidental death in 1912. 

Robert H. Swift attended the public schools of Dan- 
ville. He worked as a boy in the grocery store of Fred 
C. Hacker, and later was connected with the Wabash Rail- 
road at Tilton, Illinois, as a call boy. He subsequently 
became a locomotive fireman and in 1890 entered the 
employ of the Chicago & West Michigan Railroad at Mus- 
kegon, Michigan, as roundhouse foreman. He served in 
that capacity for about five years and then returned to 
Tilton, Illinois, as roundhouse foreman. In 1903 Mr. Swift 
became a member of the local police force under John 
Beard, mayor of Danville. He later became sergeant 
under Mayor Piatt and as captain under Mayor Madden. 
In 1922 he resigned and returned to the employ of the 
Wabash Railroad again as night roundhouse foreman. 
Due to an accident which he suffered in the shops, Mr. 
Swift was forced to retire from that work and in May, 
1927, he was appointed chief of police of Danville, which 
office he has since filled with exceptional merit. 

On September 28, 1892, Mr. Swift married Miss Mary 
C. Klage, of Danville, the daughter of William and Fred- 
erica (Radcliff) Klage, natives of Germany, both now 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 835 

deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Swift were born three chil- 
dren: Otto H., who is identified with the K. & S. Stores, 
Danville; Hilda A., married Leslie Taylor, who died in 
1921, and she is now the wife of Paul Peeler, of Clinton, 
Indiana; and Lillian M., lives at home, is employed as book- 
keeper by the Danville Motor Company. 

Mr. Swift has always been a Republican. He attends 
the Methodist Church, and his wife was reared as a mem- 
ber of the German Lutheran Church. Mr. Swift is also 
identified with the Loyal Order of Moose, charter member, 
and he belongs to the Railwaymen's Relief Association, 
and Court of Honor. 



Edgar N. Osborn, deceased, was well and favorably 
known in Danville, where he successfully conducted a 
floral business for many years. He was born at Mahomet, 
Illinois, September 26, 1870, the son of Jonathan and Fil- 
lota (Ross) Osborn. 

Jonathan Osborn was a direct descendent of Daniel 
Boone. He was a native of Kentucky and died in 1916. 
His wife, born in Ohio, died in 1910. Both are buried in 
Greenwood Cemetery, Danville. Their children numbered 
ten, of whom Edgar N., the subject of this sketch, was 
the third in order of birth. 

Edgar N. Osborn spent his boyhood on a farm in Cham- 
paign County, Illinois, and obtained his education in the 
district schools. He was eleven years old when his parents 
moved to a farm near Danville. He was employed as a 
boy in the greenhouse of Frank Smith, of Danville, and 
after several years engaged in business for himself at 
2200 North Vermilion Street. In 1906 he purchased the 
property at 101 East English Street, where he continued 
in business until the time of his death, which occurred 
May 2, 1928. His widow, Retta Osborn, has continued to 



836 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

manage the business and has met with deserved success 
in her undertaking. Early in life she was a school teacher. 
She spent several years in the county recorder's office and 
was also employed as a clerk by Mr. Wolford in the build- 
ing and loan business. In 1891 when the Palmer National 
Bank was organized Mrs. Osborn also served in the bank 
as clerk, making a total of fourteen years in the employ 
of C. J. Palmer and Mr. Wolford. In the year of 1905 she 
was employed by Harvey Adams, as a clerk in the Ver- 
milion County Building Association. She maintained an 
office in the Baum Building, where she was employed by 
the various fire insurance companies of Danville, being 
stamping secretary. Mrs. Osborn's wide business experi- 
ence has served to aid her greatly in the management of 
the business with which she is now connected. 

To Edgar N. and Retta (Sheffer) Osborn, whose mar- 
riage took place in 1894, the following children were born : 
Dorothy Myra, married Wallace Eslinger, lives at Dan- 
ville, and they have a son, Wallace Osborn Eslinger, born 
in 1927; Sarah L., married Harry L. Beane, lives at Dan- 
ville, and they have a daughter, Dorothy Jane, born in 
1924; and Laura Marian, lives at home. 

Retta (Sheffer) Osborn was born in Danville, the 
daughter of William B. and Myra (Walker) Sheffer. The 
former was born at Williamsport, Indiana. He was a Civil 
War veteran and died October 22, 1912. His widow, born 
at West Lebanon, Indiana, now lives at Danville. She is 
eighty years of age. 

Politically, Mr. Osborn was a Republican. He served 
as a member of the election board in the Seventh Ward, 
Fifth Precinct, Danville, for a number of years. He was 
a member of the Immanuel Presbyterian Church, and 
Modern Woodmen. 

Mrs. Retta Osborn is a member of the Daughters of 
the American Revolution and Daughters of the Civil War 
Veterans. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 837 

H. H. Howard. — Numbered among the progressive 
young business men of Danville is H. H. Howard, who is 
president of the Howard-Martin Tire Company, Inc. He 
is also a veteran of the World War. Mr. Howard was born 
at Volo, Illinois, October 21, 1886, the son of 0. A. and 
Nellie (Rogers) Howard. 

0. A. Howard, retired, is a native of Pennsylvania. He 
was reared and educated there and followed general farm- 
ing and stock raising until 1914, at which time he came 
to Illinois and settled at Round Lake. He is now a resi- 
dent of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Howard have the follow- 
ing children: H. H., the subject of this sketch; Vera, who 
died in 1923, was the wife of Joseph Davis, lives at Round 
Lake, Illinois; Bessie, married William Molidor, farmer, 
lives at Round Lake, Illinois; and Sarah, married Ray- 
mond Ripburger, lives at Round Lake, Illinois. 

H. H. Howard grew upon a farm near Volo, Illinois, 
and received his schooling in the district schools. He also 
attended the schools of Waukegan, Illinois, having gone 
there in 1899. Mr. Howard worked tirelessly in his efforts 
to support himself and at the same time acquire an edu- 
cation, and in so doing worked evenings in a grocery store 
as a clerk while attending day classes. In 1907 he became 
a traveling salesman for Bremner Brothers out of Chi- 
cago. Three years later he became a representative for 
the Steel- Wedeles Company of Chicago, and in 1916 estab- 
lished the International Maccaroni Company, at Joliet, 
Illinois. This business was sold by Mr. Howard in Febru- 
ary, 1918, and at that time he enlisted in the United States 
Army, Engineering Corps, for service in the World War. 
He was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa, and in June of that 
year sailed for France, where he saw active service until 
July, 1919. He participated in the drives of St. Mihiel and 
the Argonne. Following his discharge from the service 
Mr. Howard came to Danville and organized and incor- 
porated the Howard-Martin Tire Company, Inc., on Febru- 



838 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ary 5, 1920. He has continued as its president. The busi- 
ness was originally located at 111 East North Street, later 
being moved to 114 North Hazel Street, in September, 
1924. They handle automobile tires and a general line of 
replacement parts. 

In 1921 Mr. Howard married Miss Ruth Burchans, of 
Danville, the daughter of James H. and Josie (Phillips) 
Burchans. Mr. Burchans is chief electrician for the Chi- 
cago & Eastern Illinois Railroad, Danville. 

Mr. Howard is a Republican and a member of the Meth- 
odist Church. He is identified with Rising Sun Lodge No. 
115, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Chapter No. 41, 
Waukegan, Illinois; Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; Shrine, Springfield, Illinois; Gao Grotto, Danville; 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and Woodmen 
of the World. 



Philip Barton Voorhees, deceased, was an important 
figure in the business and social life of Danville, where 
he always manifested a keen interest in civic affairs. He 
was born on a farm in Newell Township, near Danville, 
January 8, 1875, the son of Peter and Mary (Button) 
Voorhees. 

Peter Voorhees spent practically his entire life on a 
farm in Newell Township, Vermilion County. He died 
in 1903 and his wife died in 1902. Both are buried in 
Springhill Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Voorhees had five 
children, as follows: Arthur, died in 1920; Rose, died in 
1910, was the wife of Gen. A. G. P. Dodge, who died in 
Chicago, Illinois, in 1918; Julia, died in 1901, was the wife 
of Ben Crawford, deceased; Daniel W., who died in 1923; 
and Philip Barton, the subject of this sketch. 

Philip Barton Voorhees spent his boyhood on his 
father's farm and received his early education in the 
schools of Danville. He was graduated from Vanderbilt 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 839 

University, at Nashville, Tennessee, and attended Colum- 
bia University, New York City, from which he was gradu- 
ated in law. He then went to Los Angeles, California, 
where he was a professor in law until 1902. Upon his 
return to Danville Mr. Voorhees became interested in the 
real estate business. He managed the properties of the 
Dodge estate, as well as the estate of his own family. 
Although Mr. Voorhees was admitted to the bar of Illinois 
he never practiced that profession. He died May 25, 1918, 
and is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. 

In 1897 Mr. Voorhees was united in marriage with Miss 
Esther Palmer, the daughter of Charles J. and Mary 
(Davis) Palmer. Mr. Palmer died in 1921 and his wife 
died in 1917. Both were natives of Danville, where they 
spent their entire lives. Mr. Voorhees was married the 
second time in Danville, September 14, 1910, to Miss Kate 
Abdill, of Danville, the daughter of Edward C. and Anna 
B. (Peters) Abdill. Mr. Abdill, born at Perrysville, 
Indiana, died in 1901, and his wife, a native of Salem, 
Illinois, born in 1843, died in 1922. Both are buried in 
Springhill Cemetery, Danville. They had the following 
children: (1) Charles Peters, married Florence Foster, 
of Covington, Indiana, lives at Danville, and they have a 
son, Russell Foster Abdill ; (2) Bertha W., married Ernest 
English, lives at Danville, and they have three children: 
Kathleen, married J. E. McMillan; Connell Abdill Eng- 
lish, lives at Saint Louis, Missouri; and Anne L. English, 
lives at Danville; (3) Kate, the widow of Philip Barton 
Voorhees, the subject of this sketch; and (4) Harry B., 
who died in 1919. 

Mr. Voorhees was always a Democrat. He attended 
the Episcopal Church, and held membership in the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, and Danville Country 
Club. He was an ardent worker in support of Lakeview 
Hospital, Danville, and served as a member of the Board 
of Directors. 



840 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Charles W. Collings, assistant postmaster of Danville, 
is a prominent citizen of Vermilion County, where he has 
spent practically his entire life. He was born at Muncie, 
Illinois, May 24, 1888, the son of John Quincy and Emma 
Frances (Wise) Collings. 

Charles W. Collings received his education in the public 
schools of Muncie, Illinois, and was twelve years of age 
when his family came to Danville, where he completed his 
schooling, being a graduate of Danville High School in 
the class of 1906. The following year was spent as a 
clerk in the grocery store of Charles Thornton, and later 
Mr. Collings was employed by W. M. Jeremy. On June 
15, 1907, he entered the local post office as a carrier, but 
served in that capacity only fifteen days, at that time 
being made clerk. On October 1, 1917, he was appointed 
assistant postmaster, in which capacity he has continued 
to serve until the present time. 

In 1912 Mr. Collings was united in marriage with Miss 
Enos Young, of Danville. Mr. and Mrs. Collings have two 
daughters: Thelma, and Martha, and one son, Marion. 

Mr. Collings is a member of the First Christian Church, 
Danville, and is affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge No. 38, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 



William M. Cannady, who is successfully engaged in 
the real estate and insurance business in Danville, is a 
member of one of the oldest and best known families of 
Vermilion County. He was born in Danville Township, 
November 30, 1865, the son of William M. and Hannah 
(Deamude) Cannady. 

William M. Cannady was born in Indiana and was a 
small boy when his family removed to Vermilion County. 
He engaged in general farming and stock raising through- 
out his life. He died in 1877 and his wife, born in Lick- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 841 

ing County, Ohio, died in January, 1866. Both are buried 
in Snyder Cemetery, near Danville. Their children were: 
George Clark, who lives at Danville; Ella M., the widow 
of John C. Burroughs, who was accidentally killed, and 
she lives at Portland, Oregon; and William M., the subject 
of this sketch. 

William M. Cannady was reared and educated at Dan- 
ville. He was cared for by his uncle, Silas W. Deamude, 
his parents both having died when he was very young. 
Mr. Cannady was employed first by the Danville Buggy 
Company, now the Henry Hulce Company, for about six 
years, and he then entered the shops of the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois Railroad as a painter. Two years later, 
due to ill health, he entered business college and in 1900 
he became chief clerk in the office of the assessor and col- 
lector, later holding the same offices himself. In 1909 
Mr. Cannady became interested in the real estate and 
insurance business and opened offices at 18 West North 
Street. Eight years later he moved to 12 West North 
Street, where he maintained offices for eight years, after 
which he located at 10 South Vermilion Street. On January 
1, 1929, Mr. Cannady moved his offices to the Jacobs Build- 
ing, 128% North Vermilion Street, where he is now 
located. He ranks among the leading realtors of the city 
and is also extensively engaged in the insurance business. 

Mr. Cannady was married the first time in 1886 to 
Miss Lizzie Atkins, of Danville, who died in 1891. She 
was the daughter of William B. and Frances Atkins. The 
former was born in Ohio and died in 1910. His wife died 
in 1912. Both are buried in Springhill Cemetery, Dan- 
ville. By his first marriage Mr. Cannady had a daughter, 
Elizabeth Atkins Cannady, who died in infancy. He was 
married in 1895 to Miss Eva F. Turner, of Urbana, Illi- 
nois, who died in 1904. She was the daughter of William 
and Elizabeth Turner. He was born in New York and 
died in 1871. His wife, a native of Pennsylvania, died in 



842 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

1914. Both are buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery, Urbana, 
Illinois. Four children were born to William M. and Eva 
F. (Turner) Cannady: John, born in 1896, lives at Dan- 
ville; Eva, born in January, 1898, died in infancy; Helen, 
born in June, 1899, married Howard L. Lawrence, teller 
at the First National Bank, Danville; and Edwin Clark, 
born in 1902, lives at Danville. 

Mr. Cannady was married the third time in June, 1927, 
to Miss Myrtle M. Hornady, of West Lebanon, Indiana, 
the daughter of John H. and Armatha (Skillman) 
Hornady. Mr. Hornady died in 1917 and his wife died in 
1922. 

Mr. Cannady has always been a Republican. He holds 
membership in St. James Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
is affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge No. 38, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, and Tribe of Ben Hur, of which he 
has been Chief for the past nine years. He is past presi- 
dent and at present secretary and treasurer of the Dan- 
ville Real Estate Board. Mr. Cannady has a wide ac- 
quaintance in the community where he has spent his 
entire life and is well liked by all who know him. 



Charles G. Jump, who is well known in Danville as 
ticket agent and station master for the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois Railroad, takes an active part in the affairs of 
his community. He was born at Lincoln, Indiana, Octo- 
ber 20, 1876, the son of William H. and Anna Ladica 
(Trapp) Jump. 

William H. Jamp, retired, is a native of Indiana, as 
is also his wife. They have spent their entire lives at 
Lincoln, where Mr. Jump was prominent as a successful 
farmer. Their children were, as follows: Emma, died 
March 13, 1907, was the wife of Walter Burke; Charles 
G., the subject of this sketch; Laura V., died November 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 843 

1, 1881; Madge, married Dr. P. G. Puterbaugh, dentist, 
Chicago, Illinois; Anna B., lives at home; Morton, died 
June 24, 1912; and Frank L., farmer, lives near Lincoln, 
Indiana. 

The boyhood of Charles G. Jump was spent on his 
father's farm and he received his education in the schools 
of Lincoln, Indiana, and in 1893 he went to Topeka, 
Kansas, where he learned telegraphy. In 1896 he went to 
Farmer City, Illinois, where he was employed by the Big 
Four Railroad as telegraph operator. After a year he 
came to Danville and spent eighteen months as an operator 
here for the Big Four Railroad, after which he was sent 
to Urbana, Illinois, for six months. He then accepted a 
position as operator with the Illinois Central Railroad at 
Champaign, Illinois, but soon after went to Tolona, Illi- 
nois, and from there to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he 
was employed by the Western Union Company for a short 
time. From there he went to Tuscola, Illinois, as an oper- 
ator for the I. B. & W. Railroad, and later to Odin, Illinois, 
in the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The 
following year was spent at Terre Haute, Indiana, with 
the Vandalia Railway, and from there Mr. Jump went to 
Hillsdale, Indiana, with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
Railroad. After a year he was employed by the Wabash 
Railroad as an operator at Peru, Indiana, under Supt. E. 
A. Gould. He served in that capacity for five years and 
then, in June, 1905, came to Danville and accepted a posi- 
tion with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad as ticket 
agent in the old Collet Street Station for four months. 
From there he was sent to Chicago Heights as ticket 
agent and six years later was promoted to traveling pas- 
senger agent, in which capacity he served for three years. 
In May, 1914, he returned to Danville as ticket agent for 
the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad at the old Col- 
let Street Station. He sold the last ticket in the old sta- 



844 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

tion and the first ticket in the new station. At the present 
time Mr. Jump is ticket agent and station master. 

On June 26, 1900, Mr. Jump married Miss Lucille M. 
Reeves, of Chicago, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Reeves. Mr. Reeves, a native of Indiana, died in 1883, 
and his wife died in 1881. To Mr. and Mrs. Jump were 
born two sons: R. St. Clair, who is assistant sales man- 
ager for the Atlantic & Pacific Stores, Indianapolis, 
Indiana; and Herbert L., who is identified with the Colby 
Furniture Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Politically, Mr. Jump is a Republican. He is a member 
of the First Presbyterian Church, and is prominent in 
lodge circles in Danville, being past Master and present 
Grand Lecturer of Anchor Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; and past Thrice Potent Master and 
Most Wise Master of Rose Croix, Danville Consistory. He 
is also a member of Eastern Star, Iris Chapter, of which 
he is Worthy Patron at present. Mr. Jump is a member 
of the Rotary Club, Danville. 



G. T. Cass, M. D. — A member of the medical profes- 
sion distinguished by more than eighteen years of service 
in Danville, is Doctor Cass, a native of this city, and a 
member of one of the old and substantial families of Ver- 
milion County. He was born November 3, 1871, the son 
of John 0. and Mary B. (Thayer) Cass. 

John 0. Cass was born on a farm near Danville, where 
he now lives retired. Pie is eighty-two years of age and 
his wife, born at Hillsboro, Ohio, is eighty years old. He 
attended the rural schools of Vermilion County and was 
enrolled in the college at State Line, Illinois. He taught 
school for a few years, but spent the greater part of his 
life as a farmer. For a time he lived at Crescent, Illinois, 
and later at Rankin, Illinois. He also farmed near Van 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 845 

Buren, Arkansas, and was the owner of a newspaper, the 
"Van Buren Argus," at that place for several years. In 
1879 he returned to his farm near Danville, where he 
remained until 1894. He then went back to Arkansas for 
five years, after which he again returned to Danville. Two 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Cass: G. T., the 
subject of this sketch; and Carrie, born in 1874, died in 
1911, was the wife of Zill Samson, and they had a daughter, 
Maida, born in 1895. 

The boyhood of G. T. Cass was spent on his father's 
farm near Danville and he received his early schooling in 
the rural schools of this section. He was graduated from 
Valparaiso University in 1891 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and then taught in the schools of Vermilion 
County for seven years. He subsequently went to Charles- 
ton, Arkansas, where he was principal of the high school 
for two years. Upon his return to Danville he worked 
on his father's farm for four years and in 1903 went to 
Valparaiso University, entering the Chicago College of 
Medicine & Surgery. He received his degree in 1907 and 
established his practice at Dodge, Nebraska, where he 
remained for one year. In the fall of 1911 he located at 
Danville, with offices at lOT 1 /^ North Vermilion Street. 
Five years later he removed to the Colonial Theater Build- 
ing and after three years in that location moved to the 
First National Bank Building, where he now has offices. 

In 1907 Doctor Cass was united in marriage with Miss 
Bennis Gordon, of Jacksonville, Illinois, the daughter of 
Benton and Charolette (Gibbs) Gordon. He died in 1900 
and his wife died in 1915. Doctor and Mrs. Cass have 
two children: Gordon, born February 1, 1909, attends 
Jacksonville (Illinois) College; and Georgia, born August 
1, 1912, attends Danville High School. 

Doctor Cass is identified with the Vermilion County 
Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, and Aesculapian Medical Society. 



846 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

He served as health commissioner under Mayor Rearick 
in 1917-18. Doctor Cass is a Democrat in politics, and is 
a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Dan- 
ville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Modern Woodmen 
of America; Royal Neighbors; and Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, No. 69. 



Charles E. Swisher is among the enterprising business 
men of Danville, where he has been a leader in business 
and civic affairs for more than a quarter of a century as 
proprietor of Charles Swisher & Sons, wholesale dealers 
in flour and feed. He was born near this city, January 
31, 1870, the son of E. F. and Maude (Hughes) Swisher. 

E. F. Swisher was born near Danville, and was a mem- 
ber of one of the first families of Vermilion County. He 
spent his boyhood on a farm and attended the district 
schools. He also attended college at State Line, Indiana, 
after which he taught school for a while. In 1887 he came 
to Danville and established a grocery business at 107 North 
Vermilion Street, which at that time was the most north- 
erly store on Vermilion Street. He successfully conducted 
this business until the time of his retirement in 1910. Mr. 
Swisher died in 1920 and his wife, a native of Ohio, died 
in 1925. Both are buried in Springhill Cemetery, Dan- 
ville. E. F. Swisher was a son of Lewis Swisher, being 
one of the first settlers of Danville, and he erected a log 
house on what is now known as Winter Avenue, a short 
distance west of Vermilion Street. This old landmark 
stood until recent years. There were two children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Swisher: Charles E., the subject of this 
sketch; and Grace, married George Barnes, lives at Effing- 
ham, Illinois. 

Charles E. Swisher grew up on a farm near Danville 
and obtained his education in the district schools. He also 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 847 

was a student at Danville Seminary. He was employed in 
his father's store until 1895, at which time he engaged in 
business for himself on Vermilion Street at the present 
site of the Adams Building. He manufactured and re- 
paired bicycles, and also operated a rental service, having 
as many as thirty-five bicycles for rent. About 1907 Mr. 
Swisher sold his shop to Force & Foul, and then organized 
the Danville Transfer Company in partnership with Ed- 
ward Shutts and R. C. Spandau. At this time Mr. Swisher 
also became interested in the flour and feed business as 
a side line. In 1911 he devoted his entire interests and 
energies to this business and located on College Street, 
adjoining the present location of Swisher & Sons. He 
disposed of his interest in the transfer business. In 1924 
Mr. Swisher removed to the modern brick and concrete 
building, where the business is now located. He has grown 
with the business and has seen the various stages in the 
flour and feed business change with the times. He handles 
everything in the manufactured feed line and supplies 
farmers within a radius of many miles of Danville. The 
company's up-to-date warehouse is located on the Wabash 
Railroad and has a storage capacity of approximately 
thirty cars. The sons of Mr. Swisher, Paul and Karl, have 
been associated with him for fifteen and eleven years, 
respectively. 

In 1892 Mr. Swisher was married to Miss Nettie Gam- 
mel, of Danville, the daughter of Johnson and Mary (Lig- 
gett) Gammel. The former, a native of New York, died 
in 1928. His wife died in 1918. Both are buried in Spring- 
hill Cemetery, Danville. Five children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Swisher: Paul E. and Karl H., associated in 
business with their father; Madeline, who has held the 
golf championship of Danville for the past three years; 
Louis, a graduate of the School of Fine Arts, Chicago, 
now an interior decorator, Danville; and Marian, a gradu- 



848 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ate of Danville High School in 1928, attends DePauw 
University. 

Politically, Mr. Swisher is a Republican. He holds 
membership in the Presbyterian Church; Masonic Lodge; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Gao Grotto; 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Danville Coun- 
try Club; Danville Yacht Club; and Roselawn Golf Club. 

Mr. Swisher spends much of his spare time in hunting 
and is a frequent visitor in southern Texas and Arkansas. 
He also enjoys duck hunting on the Illinois River. 



Alba Honeywell. — In the death of Alba Honeywell, of 
Hoopeston, the community and the State of Illinois itself 
lost one of its most distinguished and eminent citizens. He 
was born at Sherwoods Corners, New York, December 15, 
1821, and died February 4, 1916, ninety-four years of age. 
Mr. Honeywell is buried in Floral Hill Cemetery, Hoopes- 
ton. 

Alba Honeywell was the son of Enoch and Eliza (Dye) 
Honeywell. He was born in Bedford, Westchester County, 
New York, in 1788, and died January 13, 1887. His wife 
was born in Rhode Island, March 16, 1795, and died May 
4, 1868. Both are buried at Altay, New York. In his 
youth Enoch Honeywell learned the wheelwright's trade 
and he later became a farmer. He was a writer of great 
ability and wrote for many leading newspapers. He was a 
strong opponent of slavery and an ardent prohibitionist. 
Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Honey- 
well : Alba, the subject of this sketch ; Gilbert ; and Thank- 
ful Emeline, married Willard Fenno. 

Enoch Honeywell was the son of William and Elizabeth 
(Crawford) Honeywell. William Honeywell was born at 
Bedford, New York., in 1757 and died October 17, 1831. 
His wife, also a native of New York, was born in 1764, 




ALBA HONEYWELL 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 849 

and died in March, 1811. She lived just across the Croton 
River, Westchester County, New York, before her mar- 
riage to Mr. Honeywell. William Honeywell was the son 
of Enoch and Elethear (Searls) Honeywell. He was born 
April 9, 1725, and died in 1813. His wife was born in 1734 
and died in 1816. Enoch Honeywell was the son of Samuel 
and Mercy Honeywell. He was born January 8, 1695, and 
died in 1785. Samuel Honeywell was the son of Israel 
and Mary Honeywell. He came from England in 1670 
and settled in Westchester County, New York. He was 
born in 1660 and died in 1722. Israel Honeywell was the 
son of Roger Honeywell, who was born in North Devon, 
County Devonshire, England. He came to the United 
States and settled at Bedford, Westchester County, New 
York. 

Alba Honeywell, the subject of this sketch, was edu- 
cated in the grade schools of Cayuga and Steuben counties, 
New York. He was also graduated from Oneida Institute, 
near Utica, New York, and while a student there was a 
student of Rev. Uriah Green, a noted prohibitionist and 
anti-slavery lecturer. He later studied medicine and be- 
came a doctor, but never practiced that profession. Mr. 
Honeywell also studied law and was admitted to the bar, 
but never practiced. He began his early life as a teacher 
in the common schools and academies of New York and 
from the beginning was opposed to slavery, being among 
the first to become actively engaged in the organization of 
a political party for the abolition of slavery. He was so 
prominent that he was chosen as a delegate to the Buffalo 
convention that nominated James G. Birney for the presi- 
dency on the Abolitionist ticket. He was one who helped 
to smuggle the slaves through to the north on the under- 
ground railroad. Mr. Honeywell lived at Rochester, New 
York, for some time and then removed to New York City, 
where he became editor of the New York Eagle. He was 
also associated there with the American Anti-Slavery So- 

20— Vol. 2 



850 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ciety and for four years was associate editor of the New 
York Standard. Owing to ill health, however, Mr. Honey- 
well was forced to retire from newspaper work. He had 
become interested in literature at an early date and became 
well known as an author. He was the writer of several 
plays, which were dramatized. Mr. Honeywell was also 
greatly interested in the Pittman system of phonetic spell- 
ing and was the author of a dictionary. 

In 1848 Mr. Honeywell became associated with An- 
drews & Boyle in the publication of the Anglo-Saxon, a 
paper devoted entirely to phonetic reform in spelling. He 
wrote and edited an exhaustive treatise of eleven volumes 
of language, embracing all its departments for elementary 
phonetics to rhetoric and logic. On April 14, 1853, he left 
New York and arrived at Lafayette, Indiana, by packet 
boat. He subsequently made his way to Iroquois County, 
Illinois, where he purchased one thousand acres of land, 
which is now Stockland Township. He spent three years 
in that section and made substantial improvements. In 
the spring of 1856 he started for Minnesota with his fam- 
ily but stopped at Chicago, Illinois, where he became identi- 
lied with the Chicago News. The following year he re- 
moved to Logansport, Ind., where he became successful as 
a manufacturer of lumber. He also was a teacher there. 
At the outbreak of the Civil War he was offered a commis- 
sion in an Indiana regiment but circumstances prevented 
him from accepting. In 1863 Mr. Honeywell removed to 
Iroquois County, 111., where he managed his vast agricul- 
tural interests. He also served as township assessor for 
six years and as county clerk for four years, at that time 
maintaining his residence at Watseka, Illinois. The fam- 
ily located at Hoopeston in 1873. During his term as 
county clerk Mr. Honeywell invested largely in Vermilion 
County property, which is now part of the incorporated 
limits of Hoopeston. He helped in the laying out of the 
city of Hoopeston and added to additions and subdivisions 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 851 

in the city plat, always taking an active part in the de- 
velopment of Hoopeston. In 1879 he became mayor and 
assisted largely in creating and fostering the sentiment 
that has made Hoopeston a saloon-less town. 

Mr. Honeywell also took an active part in the organiza- 
tion of the canning and sugar industries here, having lost 
considerable money in the failure of the sugar business, 
but the canning business continued as the major industry 
in this section. He was also one of the organizers of the 
First National Bank of Watseka, Illinois, of which he 
served as a director for thirty years. He became the owner 
of over three thousand acres of land in Vermilion and Iro- 
quois counties and also had real estate holdings in Cook, 
Lake and Scott counties, Illinois, as well as in Florida. He 
was the owner of Hygiana Springs, near Boswell, Indiana, 
and improved that summer resort extensively. Mr. Honey- 
well was the owner of the Ludington Canning Company at 
Ludington, Mich. He built a fine summer home at Lake 
Bluff, Illinois, which is now owned and occupied by his 
daughter, Mrs. Beall. 

On April 3, 1851, Mr. Honeywell was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Cornelia Rosetta Andrews, the daughter 
of Dr. Anson and Sarah (Randall) Andrews, natives of 
New York, both now deceased. He was a leading physi- 
cian and surgeon of Reading, New York. Mrs. Honey- 
well was a woman of fine mind and heart and devoted to 
her family. Four daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Honeywell: 1. Estella, married John Calvin Cromer, de- 
ceased. She lives at Hoopeston. They had a son, Alba 
C. H., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this history; 
2. Florence Andrews, married Major A. H. Trego, who 
died in 1916. She lives at Hoopeston; 3. Lillian Amelia, 
married Rev. Thomas A. Beall, deceased. She lives at Lake 
Bluff, Illinois. They had three children: Homer Honey- 
well, Florence Yolanda, and Cornelius Allene; 4. Sadie 



852 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Eliza, married Dr. Albert Marion Earel, lives at Hoopes- 
ton. They have a daughter, Eleanor Claire. 

Mr. Honeywell was a member of the Universalist 
Church. He was very liberal in his gifts to his church and 
city. Among the outstanding gifts to Hoopeston may be 
mentioned the ground which is the site of the Carnegie 
Public Library, and two parks in the city of Hoopeston. 



O. H. Crist, M. D., is numbered among the prominent 
physicians and surgeons of Danville, where he has engaged 
in practice with unusual success for the past twenty-two 
years. He is a native of Indiana, born at Lewis, October 
22, 1878, the son of Marcus D. and Laura J. (Mahan) Crist. 

Marcus D. Crist and his wife were natives of Indiana. 
He was a farmer throughout his life. He died in 1893 at 
the age of forty-five years and is buried in Friendly Grove 
Cemetery, Lewis, Indiana. Mr. Crist was a life long mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. His wife died in 1912. They 
were the parents of four children: C. C, lives at Shel£aa)° o r*\ 
Indiana; D. D., lives at Shel&Si^ndiana ; A. R., chemist 
with the Cornstalk Products Company, lives at Danville, 
is a World War veteran, having served in France; and 
0. H., the subject of this sketch. 

The boyhood of 0. H. Crist was spent in Lewis, Indiana, 
where he attended the public schools. He subsequently 
attended Indiana State Normal School for two years, and 
later entered the Medical School of Northwestern Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in 1906. He then 
came to Danville and served as interne in St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital for one year, after which he established offices 
at 2009 East Main Street. Eight years later he removed 
to his present location, 206 Adams Building. Doctor Crist 
is widely known as a specialist in women's diseases and is 
a leading surgeon of this section. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 853 

In 1913 Doctor Crist was united in marriage with Miss 
Edna Starkey, of Pesotum, Illinois, the daughter of Eli 
W. and Fannie (Davis) Starkey. Mr. Starkey lives retired 
at Shawnee, Oklahoma. His wife died in 18930 and is 
buried at Pesotum, Illinois. Doctor and Mrs. Crist have 
two children: Jack Wesley, born September 12, 1917; and 
Joan, born February 11, 1923. 

Doctor Crist is a Republican, a member of McKinley 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Masonic Lodge, thirty-second 
degree, Danville Country Club, and he is identified with 
the Vermilion County Medical Society, Illinois State Med- 
ical Society, and American Medical Association. He is a 
member of the staffs of St. Elizabeth's and Lakeview hos- 
pitals, and is district surgeon for the Milwaukee Railway 
and assistant district surgeon for the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois Railroad, Danville. 



Ira C. Keefer, successful building contractor of Dan- 
ville, is a native of Indiana. He was born at Rob Roy, 
August 20, 1881, the son of Robert D. and Ida A. (Claw- 
son) Keefer. 

Robert D. Keefer, deceased, was a native of Indiana. 
He became identified with his father's general contract- 
ing business at Rob Roy early in life and from 1895 until 
1899 conducted a general mercantile business at that place, 
and at the same time served as postmaster. Mr. Keefer 
died June 9, 1899, at the age of forty-six years and is 
buried in Beulah Cemetery, Rob Roy. His widow lives 
at Danville. They had the following children: Ira C, 
the subject of this sketch; Effie M., married Charles E. 
Hughes, lives at Danville; Ora L., died November 9, 1918, 
had a son, Robert D., who lives at Marion, Indiana; Ruby 
D., married L. W. King, lives at Danville; and Robert L., 
World War veteran, lives at Danville, Illinois. 



854 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Ira C. Keefer grew up at Rob Roy, Indiana, and was 
educated in the public schools. As a boy he was interested 
in carpentry work in his father's shop and he also was 
identified with his father's business at Rob Roy. In 1905 
he sold the store and came to Danville, where he was 
employed as a carpenter by Charles Gillespie for two 
years. The following six years were spent in the employ 
of Joseph Schingel. In 1913 Mr. Keefer engaged in the 
contracting business for himself. He moved his place of 
business to 651 East Fairchild Street ten years later, 
where he is now located. While Mr. Keefer carries on a 
general contracting business he has specialized in resi- 
dential work. Among some of the fine homes built by 
him are the George Fox residence at 1202 Sherman Street, 
the William Current residence at 1304 Franklin Street, and 
the Everett Dalbey residence on East Raymond Street. 
He also erected the parsonage of St. Paul's Church. Mr. 
Keefer also makes a specialty of surfacing and finishing 
hardwood floors. 

Mr. Keefer is unmarried. He is a Republican in politics 
and holds membership in St. James Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 



J. F. Clem, who is manager of the Lincoln Tire Com- 
pany, Danville, is a veteran of the World War, and is 
recognized as one of the successful young business men 
of the community. He is a native of Labette County, 
Kansas, born January 8, 1891, the son of John David and 
Sarah Jane (Cooper) Clem. 

John David Clem, retired, has Spent practically his 
entire life in Vermilion County. He was born in Warren 
County, Indiana, and was a small child when his parents 
removed to this county. He was reared and educated near 
Danville, and in 1876 went to Kansas, where he farmed 
until 1892. He then returned to Vermilion County and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 855 

located on a farm four miles west of Danville. He was 
the founder of the telephone system at Bismark, Illinois, 
where he was located until 1916. In that year he came to 
Danville and worked as an engineer in Lakeview Hos- 
pital until his retirement in 1922. His wife is a native of 
Springfield, Missouri. Their children were: W. A., lives 
at Corinth, North Dakota; James Louis, lives near Arm- 
strong, Illinois; Ada E., died at the age of eight years; 
Leona Myrtle, married H. M. Ballard, lives at Danville; 
J. F., the subject of this sketch; Ross A., lives at Danville; 
and Harold D., a World War veteran, lives at Newburg, 
New York. 

J. F. Clem was educated in the public schools of Bis- 
marck. He learned the plasterer's trade, which he fol- 
lowed until April 5, 1917, at which time he volunteered 
for service in the World War. He enlisted in Battery A, 
One Hundred Forty-ninth Field Artillery, Rainbow Divi- 
sion, and was sent to Fort Sheridan, Illinois, and later to 
Camp Mills, New York. He sailed for France on Sep- 
tember 1, 1917, and went to the front lines immediately, 
participating in the battles of Chateau Thierry, Com- 
piegne, Argonne, and Belleau Wood. He spent nine 
months in the trenches and on December 3, 1918, was sent 
to the hospital, due to shell shock. He was discharged 
from the service on March 30, 1919, and returned to Dan- 
ville. Due to poor health after the war, Mr. Clem was 
unable to follow his trade and sought outside employment 
with the American Railway Express Company. In May, 
1923, he became manager of a branch store for the 
Kokomo Rubber Company, which was later sold to W. T. 
Flynn, and Mr. Clem remained as manager for the com- 
pany until 1927, at which time he opened a tire store of 
his own on West Main Street, known as the Lincoln Tire 
Company. Mr. Clem is distributor for Dunlap automo- 
bile tires and handles Texaco and Kendall products in 
gasoline and oils. 



856 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On September 28, 1919, Mr. Clem married Miss Grace 
May Allen, of Cates, Indiana, the daughter of George and 
Rose (McGee) Allen, both of whom were killed in an auto- 
mobile accident on April 18, 1923. They are buried at 
Cooper's Chapel, Cates, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Clem had 
two children, Curtis G. and Lola Ruth, both of whom died 
in infancy. An adopted daughter, Frances Opal Clem, was 
born in 1922. 

Politically, Mr. Clem is a Democrat. He is a member 
of the Methodist Church; Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Olive Branch; Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; Modern Woodmen of America; and Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, Jewel White Post No. 728; and he is also 
president of Battery A Club. 



J. W. Sink. — Active and progressive in business, J. W. 
Sink is prominent in Danville, where he is identified with 
J. W. Sink & Son, Hotel Wolford Garage and Service Sta- 
tion. He was born in Franklin County, Virginia, October 
27, 1874, the son of David and Martha (Frantz) Sink. 

David Sink, retired, is a native of Virginia. He spent 
his boyhood on a farm in Franklin County and received 
his education in the district schools. Mr. Sink was a resi- 
dent of that section until 1906, at which time he located 
at Flora, Indiana, where he now lives retired. He is now 
eighty years of age. His father died at the age of ninety- 
three years. Martha (Frantz) Sink, who died February 
13, 1926, is buried at Flora, Indiana. Her death was the 
first to occur in the immediate family during a period of 
seventy-five years. Twelve children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. David Sink, all of whom are living, as follows: 
Charles F., lives at Flora, Indiana; J. W., the subject of 
this sketch; Oscar K., lives at South Whitley, Indiana; 
Joseph C, lives at Camden, Indiana; Edna, married Albert 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 857 

Huber, lives at Glendora, California; May, married 
Thomas Frantz, lives at Camden, Indiana; Berkley D., 
lives at Flora; Samuel S., lives at Camden; Rev. Robert 
L., minister of the Brethren Church, lives at Des Moines, 
Iowa; Clyde Ray, lives at Flora; Ernest, lives at Bring- 
hurst, Indiana; and Pearl, married Ora Shirar, lives at 
Bringhurst. 

J. W. Sink remained on his father's farm in Franklin 
County, Virginia, until 1895. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and engaged in farming near Flora, Indiana, 
from 1895 until 1901, at which time he became interested 
in the carriage and implement business at Bringhurst, 
Indiana. Four years later he sold his business there but 
established another business of the same type at Flora, 
under the firm name of Sink & Ikenburry. Mr. Sink dis- 
posed of this business in 1907 and spent the following two 
years as a traveling representative for the Ligonier Car- 
riage Company. In 1909 he became associated with the 
International Harvester Company, with whom he was em- 
ployed until 1914. He spent the following year at Joliet, Illi- 
nois, with the Moline Plow Company, and in 1915 went to 
Rensselaer, Indiana, with the International Harvester 
Company. He was transferred to Kankakee, Illinois, in 
1918, and the following year came to Danville. In 1921 Mr. 
Sink incorporated the Vermilion County Motor Bus Com- 
pany with headquarters at 24 North Hazel Street. He 
became agent for the Reo automobile in this city in 1925, 
but in January, 1926, disposed of the latter and continued 
in the bus business. In August, 1928, J. W. Sink & Son 
leased the property at the corner of Harrison and North 
Hazel streets where on was erected a large brick storage 
garage. The building has a capacity of one hundred cars 
and provides ample room for repairs and service. In Sep- 
tember, 1929, the company leased a section of the building 
to the Morris Motor Company, who are agents for the 
Cadillac and LaSalle automobiles. 



858 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

On September 2, 1905, Mr. Sink was married at Winona 
Lake, Indiana, to Miss Lottie Myer, of Flora, Indiana, the 
daughter of Amos and Serener (Brim) Myer. Mr. Myer 
died in 1913 and his wife died April 20, 1929. Both are 
buried at Flora. Mr. and Mrs. Sink's son, Donald M., is 
a partner in the business with his father. He was born 
in 1906 and was educated in the public schools of Joliet, 
Kankakee, and Danville. He has been associated in busi- 
ness with his father since 1921. Previous to that time he 
was interested in the real estate business in Florida, being 
identified with the Haven Villa Corporation. He also 
spent some time in California with the C. R. May Com- 
pany, Buick distributors. Throughout his high school 
career he took a prominent part in athletics and had the 
distinction of being a member of the all county football 
team for three years, and the State team for one year. 
He was also interested in basketball and baseball. He has 
remained an ardent follower of the Danville High School 
teams and with his parents is a firm supporter of the local 
teams. He was married in 1924 to Miss Maxine Elliot 
Cook, of Catlin, Illinois. They have a son, John Frederick, 
born September 1, 1927. 

J. W. Sink is a member of the Brethren Church. He 
belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Rotary Club. He is 
president of the Rose Lawn Club and is an ardent golfer. 
Politically, Mr. Sink is a Republican. 



Solomon Jones, M. D. — One of the physicians and sur- 
geons of Vermilion County is Doctor Jones, specialist in 
diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, who has been 
engaged in practice at Danville for twenty-five years. He 
was born near Perrysville, Indiana, June 2, 1872, the son 
of James Madison and Ellen (Skelton) Jones. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 859 

James Madison Jones was born near Perrysville, In- 
diana. He was a farmer and stock raiser and spent his 
entire life in that section of Indiana. He died on Decem- 
ber 22, 1926, and is buried in Atherton Cemetery, near 
Danville. His widow, born in Eugene, Indiana, resides on 
the old homestead near Perrysville. Their children were: 
Ella May Randall, lives at Danville, R. F. D. No. 6; Solo- 
mon, the subject of this sketch; V. M., garage owner, lives 
at Danville; Leah Houser, lives at Danville, R. F. D. No. 8; 
Cortz, farmer, lives five miles west of Perrysville; and 
Victor H., farmer, lives six miles west of Perrysville. 

Solomon Jones was educated in the grade schools of 
Highland Township, Vermillion County, Indiana, and fol- 
lowing his graduation from high school entered Indiana 
State Normal School. He was subsequently graduated 
from Illinois Medical College, Chicago, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1902. While a medical student 
Doctor Jones taught school in Highland Township from 
1895 until 1902, and during the spring and summer seasons 
studied medicine. In January, 1903, he opened an office 
at 11 South Hazel Street, Danville, and began the practice 
of general medicine and surgery. He located in the Tem- 
ple Building in 1906. In September, 1915, he entered the 
New York Post Graduate School for one year, and upon 
his return to Danville his practice was limited to the eye, 
ear, nose and throat, with offices at 611-13 Temple Build- 
ing. During 1927 Doctor Jones studied at the University 
of Vienna, Austria. 

On November 18, 1902, Doctor Jones married Miss Ella 
A. Van Meter, who was born near Kankakee, Illinois, the 
daughter of Jesse B. and Isabella (Bickle) Van Meter, 
natives of Iroquois and Kankakee counties, respectively. 
Mr. Van Meter, now eighty-three years of age, lives on a 
small farm near Danville. His wife died January 9, 1921, 
and is buried in Atherton Cemetery. Doctor and Mrs. 
Jones have a son, Jerome V. He attended the grade 



860 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

schools of Danville, was graduated from Miami Military- 
Institute, Germantown, Ohio, English Course, in 1924, and 
Latin Scientific Course in 1925, attaining the rank of 
major, with honors. At the present time he attends the 
University of Illinois. 

Doctor Jones has been a member of the Vermilion 
County Medical Society for the past twenty-six years, 
served as secretary for seven years, and as president in 
1915. He is a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion; American Medical Association of Vienna, Austria; 
Tri-State Medical Association and Post Graduate; Ameri- 
can College of Surgeons; and president of Aesculapian 
Society of Wabash Valley in 1929. He is a member of 
Lakeview Hospital staff and served as a member of the 
school board of Danville from 1912 until 1918. 

Doctor Jones is a Democrat, a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Danville, and is affiliated with 
Unity Lodge No. 344, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Perrysville, Indiana; Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree. His wife is a member of Eastern Star, Milford, 
Illinois; Womans Club, Danville; National Congress of 
Parents and Teachers; and Illinois Congress of Parents 
and Teachers. 



Herbert Frederick Wolter is perhaps one of the best 
known and most successful of the younger business men 
of Danville, where he is proprietor of the Danville Baby 
Chick Company. He was born at Danville, September 19, 
1896, the son of William Frederick and Caroline Louisa 
(Housewaldt) Wolter. 

William Frederick Wolter, retired, is a native of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. He followed farming throughout his active 
career and was widely known as a dairyman. He pur- 
chased his first farm in 1885 and lived there until 1895, 
at which time he removed to Danville. Mr. Wolter, how- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 861 

ever, continued to operate his farms until his retirement 
in 1918. He lives at Danville. His wife is a native of 
Eugene, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Wolter have the follow- 
ing children: Frank Christopher, lives at Perrysville, 
Indiana; William Wolter and Nellie Elizabeth, both de- 
ceased; and Herbert Frederick, the subject of this sketch. 

Herbert Frederick Wolter attended the public schools 
of Danville and was graduated from the College of Agri- 
culture, University of Illinois, in 1918. He was a teacher 
of agriculture and athletic coach at Mt. Carroll (Illinois) 
High School for one year, after which he accepted a posi- 
tion as state leader in boys' and girls' club work in the 
Extension Service of the University of Illinois. Mr. Wol- 
ter continued in this work for a period of four years, and 
in August, 1923, became interested in the feed milling busi- 
ness in Danville, associating himself with the Fecker Mill- 
ing Company as manager of the mill. On January 1, 1925, 
he engaged in his present business of hatching chicks. He 
began the first strictly commercial hatchery in this sec- 
tion of the State, using a ten thousand egg Buckeye incu- 
bator. The hatchery operates under the name of the Dan- 
ville Baby Chick Company. Its first location was at 108 
South Street, Danville. The second year the hatchery was 
moved to 511 East Main Street, its present location. The 
capacity of the incubators was increased by the addition 
of a Smith forty-seven thousand egg incubator, and the 
following year another Smith incubator of the same capac- 
ity was added to the equipment, making this the largest 
hatchery in this section of the State. 

The Danville Baby Chick Company hatches and sells a 
quarter of a million chicks annually. Most of them are 
sold locally. It purchases its supply of eggs from more 
than 100 specially selected and mated farm flocks that are 
under the direction and supervision of Mr. Wolter him- 
self. The patronage of this company has been built up 



862 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

through high quality chicks, honest and fair dealing, and 
service to the customer. 

On June 12, 1924, Mr. Wolter was united in marriage 
with Miss Harriet Muriel Phillips, who was born at Chi- 
cago, Illinois, March 4, 1893, the daughter of James Hamil- 
ton and Evalena May (Edridge) Phillips. Mr. Phillips was 
born at Coldwater, Michigan, and his wife is a native of 
Allegan, Michigan. They are residents of Saugatuck, 
Michigan. To Mr. and Mrs. Wolter a son has been born, 
James Herbert. 

Mr. Wolter is a Republican, a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church, and is affiliated with Further Light 
Lodge, No. 1130, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Dan- 
ville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Gao Grotto; and 
Curtis Redden Post, American Legion, Danville. 

During the World War Mr. Wolter entered the officers' 
training camp at Fort Sheridan and was commissioned 
second lieutenant, Field Artillery. He served until Decem- 
ber 15th and was attached to the Thirty-seventh Training 
Battery at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky. 



John Olson, president of the Olson Cut Stone Company, 
Danville, is a reliable and highly successful business man 
of Vermilion County. He is a native of Sweden, born 
February 16, 1858, the son of Olaf and Annie (Nord) 
Olson. 

Olaf Olson spent his entire life in Sweden and died in 
1876. His wife died in Danville in 1909 and is buried in 
Springhill Cemetery. Mr. Olson had a common school 
education and learned the trade of stone cutter, which he 
followed throughout his life. He was fifty-nine years of 
age at the time of his death. To Mr. and Mrs. Olson were 
born the following children: Lars, who died in 1926; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 863 

Mons, who died in 1922; Olaf, who died in 1917; Neal, who 
died in 1909; and John, the subject of this sketch. 

John Olson grew up in his native land and was twenty- 
one years old when he came to the United States. He had 
learned the granite cutting trade and after his arrival in 
this country he settled at Johnsonville, near Danville. He 
entered the employ of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Rail- 
road and engaged in construction work for a few months, 
after which he worked in the Grape Creek Coal Mine. 
Later, he began as a clerk for the Grape Creek Coal Com- 
pany Store, in the mining section near Danville. In 1890 
he became a stone contractor and engaged in building con- 
crete and stone bridges and abutments. In 1904 Mr. Olson 
opened a stone yard on the Big Four Railroad. The busi- 
ness was finally removed in 1926 to its present location 
at 1505 Factory Street. Mr. Olson is now associated in 
the business with his two sons, Fred W. and David A. 
Olson. The former is office manager and the latter serves 
as superintendent. The most modern appliances and 
machinery are in use in the company's plant, including 
electric stone cutting saws, etc. Among the numerous 
large contracts handled by the Olson Cut Stone Company 
are the following : St. James Methodist Episcopal Church ; 
Lincoln Methodist Episcopal Church ; and Young Women's 
Christian Association. 

In 1881 Mr. Olson was united in marriage with Miss 
Hattie Johnson, of Sweden, the daughter of Orh and 
Petronella Johnson. The former died in 1888 and the 
latter in 1896. To Mr. and Mrs. Olson nine children were 
born, as follows: (1) Annie, married Robert Muirhead, 
lives at Danville; (2) Bessie, who died in 1922, was the 
wife of Jesse Shaffer; (3) Fred W., a graduate of Dan- 
ville High School and Success Shorthand School, Chicago, 
is a veteran of the World War, having served in France, 
and as clerk to the American Council in Odessa, Russia, 
now associated in business with his father in Danville; 



864 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

(4) Nellie, who died in 1922, was the wife of Albert 
Schultz; (5) Sadie, who died in 1911, was the wife of 
Charles Muirhead, of Danville; (6) Oscar E., who is identi- 
fied with his father's business in Danville; (7) David A., 
also identified with the Olson Cut Stone Company; 

(8) Esther, married Jack Foster, lives at Danville; and 

(9) Donald P., lives in Danville. 

Mr. Olson is a Republican and holds membership in 
the Gospel Tabernacle Church. He and his family are 
prominent members of the community in which they have 
spent so many years. 



Jacob S. McFerren. — A man of natural forces so con- 
stituted that from his earliest boyhood to the end of his 
life he utilized time as if each moment was of golden value, 
Jacob S. McFerren, commercial, industrial, and financial 
leader of Hoopeston, rose to his commanding position in 
the affairs of men through strong native ability, controlled 
and directed by a far reaching foresight and a keen judg- 
ment which he possessed in an exceptional degree. The 
following paragraphs indicate in outline the nature of his 
notable service to his time and record the estimate placed 
by his contemporaries upon his worth as a man of affairs 
and as a citizen. 

Jacob S. McFerren was born in Warren County, Ohio, 
October 1, 1845, the son of William M. and Eliza (Snyder) 
McFerren, the father being a merchant who was born in 
South Carolina and who died in 1894. There was another 
son, Pingree, and two daughters, Alvira B., who married 
Edward C. Griffith, and Mrs. Mary Huey, of Hoopeston. 

Jacob S. McFerren received his early education in the 
public schools of his native county and later in Bartlett 
Commercial College in Cincinnati, Ohio. He obtained his 
first business experience under the direction of his father, 




JACOB S. McFBRRBN 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 865 

whom he assisted during vacation period, and when fifteen 
years of age he left school and became an equal partner in 
a business at Level, Ohio, with his uncle who supplied the 
capital while he managed the enterprise and shared equally 
in the profits. His store was conducted under the firm 
name of J. S. McFerren and Company, his uncle two years 
later entering into other business connections and becoming 
a member of a grain firm. In the meantime Mr. McFerren 
had built up an extensive trade, but a heavy decline in the 
grain market and other disastrous speculations causing 
his uncle's firm to suspend business with heavy liabilities, 
the firm of J. S. McFerren and Company was naturally in- 
volved, and so it was closed out and all debts paid in full, 
leaving an untarnished name as asset. This and about 
$300 was all that Mr. McFerren had left of the $3,000 
clear profit he had made in this, his first mercantile ven- 
ture. He then sought employment and remained in Ohio 
until 1865 when, believing that better opportunities 
awaited an energetic young man somewhere further west, 
he made his way to Paxton, Illinois. He was then about 
twenty years of age and his first position in this new en- 
vironment was taking charge of the books for J. W. Scott, 
but he soon secured a more lucrative position with R. Clark, 
one of the oldest merchants of Paxton, whom he served as 
bookkeeper until the end of the year. At that time, owing 
to failing health, Mr. Clark offered to turn over his stock 
and business to his nephew, A. L. Clark, and to Mr. Mc- 
Ferren, loaning them all the needed capital. This proposi- 
tion was accepted and the firm of Clark and McFerren 
started its career. Success attended the venture from the 
beginning and establishing the business upon a substan- 
tial basis their capital steadily and rapidly increased. 
They enlarged their stock to meet the growing demands of 
their trade, which they fostered with integrity, activity 
and honesty. Mr. McFerren's initiative spirit, his daring 
and fearlessness in following wherever opportunity beck- 
oned soon led him to engage in banking and in the real 

21— Vol. 2 



866 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

estate business, and associating himself with T. W. Cham- 
berlain in these ventures, they opened a bank at Hoopes- 
ton on August 1, 1872, under the name of McFerren and 
Chamberlain. Although but a new firm, they successfully 
weathered the financial panic of 1873, keeping their doors 
open during that trying period and winning public con- 
fidence by the safe and conservative methods which they 
followed. In 1874, owing to ill health, Mr. Chamberlain 
retired, and Mr. McFerren assuming complete control be- 
came president and brought this business to a point of de- 
velopment that marks it today as one of the strong na- 
tional banks of the State. He was also interested in bank- 
ing circles in Danville. 

Mr. McFerren's natural energy was so great that he 
filled every moment of his life with intense activity, never 
wasting any time, and his thrift of this tremendous asset, 
time, supported by faithfulness of purpose and never end- 
ing effort led him into broad channels. With his genius 
for organization he marshalled and coordinated forces so 
that his plans, always subjected to the test of his sound 
judgment, rarely miscarried, but moved on to substantial 
success. His investments, made judiciously and with dis- 
crimination, resulted in making him owner of several thou- 
sand acres of land in and near Hoopeston, while in his as- 
sociation with the firm of Moore, McFerren and Seavey, 
from which Mr. Seavey withdrew later, they possessed 
large land interests in the South, throughout the State of 
Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee. Their operations in 
these sections were of great public benefit for they not 
only bought and sold land but greatly improved property, 
established industries thereon, and secured transportation 
facilities through railroad building that have been of in- 
estimable value to the various communities involved. They 
were the builders of twenty miles of railroad from Luxora, 
Arkansas, to Big Lake, called the Mississippi, Big Lake 
and Western Railroad, and had holdings along that line 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 867 

amounting to 30,000 acres of land, for which the railroad 
furnished an outlet for their lumber and also constituted 
a part of the trunk line from the Mississippi River to Jop- 
lin, Missouri. They had extensive saw mills at Luxora, 
Pitman's Island, and at Woodstock, Mississippi, besides 
others, all with a capacity of from twenty thousand to 
twenty-five thousand feet per day, their most extensive 
lumber industry, however, being located at Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, where they had a double band saw mill with a ca- 
pacity of fifty thousand feet per day, the plant there hav- 
ing been erected at a cost of $75,000. Their interests like- 
wise included a box factory at Memphis. 

Hoopeston has profited largely by the efforts of Mr. 
McFerren, not only in its industrial upbuilding but also in 
its civic and moral welfare. He was, on the industrial side, 
one of the founders of the Union Tin Can Company and 
when it merged into the American Tin Can Company he 
became a stockholder in that. He was a joint owner with 
A. H. Trego of the Hoopeston Canning Company, devoted 
exclusively to the canning of corn, an enterprise that 
stands foremost in its class in the country, garnering as 
it does the corn from the great belt of the district. His 
real estate holdings in Hoopeston included the bank build- 
ing, office building, and opera house building, besides many 
business and residential structures. 

Mr. McFerren was chosen Hoopeston's first mayor and 
he was reelected to that honored office on several different 
occasions thereafter. During his first term he succeeded 
in suppressing all the saloons in town and there has never 
been an established liquor business in Hoopeston since that 
time. He also did much for the improvement of streets, 
including the paving, and wherever there was need of re- 
form in the upbuilding and progress of the town he labored 
effectively. He was treasurer and director of the district 
agricultural society, school treasurer of township No. 23, 
range No. 12, and one of the original projectors of the 



868 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Ford County Agricultural Society. He supported liberally 
church and benevolent enterprises and all undertakings 
that were for the public benefit and general good. He 
gave generously to the Hoopeston Public Library and pre- 
sented to the city a public park, having purchased for this 
the old fair grounds, comprising thirty acres of land. His 
public activities brought him in touch with many of the 
political leaders of his early day, among whom was Joseph 
G. Cannon, who was his close friend, as well as being Illi- 
nois' well known statesman. 

Mr. McFerren married (first) April 4, 1871, Susie P. 
Clark, daughter of R. Clark. Her death occurred the same 
year, on July 28th. He married (second) Lida A. Schultz, 
who died in 1894, leaving two sons, William and Donald, 
whose sketches appear in this volume. In 1897 Mr. Mc- 
Ferren married (third) Lottie L. Schultz, a sister of his 
former wife, and their residence was one of the homes in 
Hoopeston noted for its warm hearted hospitality. 

A life of vigorous energy spent in the promotion and 
extension of a number of important productive industries 
of the country, given in the civic service of the city of his 
adoption, Jacob S. McFerren made it a study to subserve 
his natural inclinations to the demands which modern con- 
ditions of society impose upon a man in public eye, and so 
well and ably did he use his forces that at his passing he 
left vacant a commanding position in the social civic and 
representative business life of his community that will 
long be left unfilled. His home and family life was beau- 
tiful in its marked simplicity and in spite of the many de- 
mands that his active career made upon him he found time 
for forming and cementing those bonds of affection and 
friendship that are life's finest reward. 

Mr. McFerren died at Chandler, Arizona, January 7, 
1923, and is buried in Hoopeston. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 869 

William McFerren, president of the First National 
Bank, is a prominent citizen of Hoopeston, active in its 
social, fraternal and community affairs. He was born in 
this city, December 27, 1886, the son of Jacob S. and Lida 
(Schultz) McFerren. 

A complete sketch of Jacob S. McFerren appears else- 
where in this edition. 

William McFerren was educated in the public and high 
schools of Hoopeston, from which he was graduated. He 
then attended Hotchkiss Preparatory School and upon 
completing his schooling returned to Hoopeston, where he 
entered business as local agent for the Overland automo- 
bile. In 1912 he became identified with the First National 
Bank as vice president and director, and upon the death of 
his father in 1923 was elected president of the institution. 

During the World War Mr. McFerren enlisted at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, in the United States navy, 
aviation section. He took ground school work at the 
Masschusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, and was 
later qualified as a balloon pilot at Akron, Ohio, finally be- 
coming a student officer. He was discharged from the 
service December 2, 1919. 

Mr. McFerren married Miss Marjorie Welles, the 
daughter of Edward M. and Marietta (Smith) Welles, na- 
tives of Addison, New York, now residents of Norwalk, 
Connecticut. Mr. Welles is a retired paper manufacturer. 
Mr. and Mrs. McFerren are the parents of three children : 
William, Jr., born March 7, 1915; Marjorie, born in 1917; 
and Patricia, born in June, 1923. 

Mr. McFerren holds membership in the Universalist 
Church and has the following club and lodge affiliations: 
Star Lodge, No. 709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Mohammed 
Shrine Temple ; Loyal Order of Moose ; Lions Club ; Ameri- 
can Legion; Hubbard Trail Country Club; Commercial 
Club; and Chamber of Commerce. He is also identified 



870 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

with the Vermilion County, Illinois, and American Bank- 
ers Associations. He is interested in the Hoopeston Can- 
ning Company, which was founded by his father. 

Politically Mr. McFerren is a Republican. He is presi- 
dent of the Hoopeston School Board. 



Donald C. Good, M. D., is perhaps one of the most 
prominent and successful of the younger physicians and 
surgeons of Danville, with offices in the First National 
Bank Building. He was born at Mankato, Kansas, Decem- 
ber 22, 1895, the son of C. W. and Zillah (Davidson) Good. 

C. W. Good, who lives retired at Hiawatha, Kansas, is 
a native of Montrose, Illinois. He spent his boyhood in 
Illinois but due to ill health went West soon after com- 
pleting his schooling. He made the trip in a covered 
wagon and traveled approximately seven thousand miles 
throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa, before he located 
in Kansas, where he attended a normal school. He then 
became a teacher and for thirty years was identified with 
the schools of Kansas as county superintendent. He also 
farmed and at one time was connected with the Chau- 
tauqua and Lyceum Bureau of Chicago in Nebraska. Mr. 
Good also studied law and was admitted to the Kansas 
bar to practice, although he never followed this profes- 
sion. He has been a resident of Hiawatha, Kansas, since 
1904, and is now serving as city clerk. His wife is a 
native of Fairview, Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Good's only 
child was Donald C, the subject of this sketch. 

Donald C. Good attended the public schools of Fair- 
view, Kansas, and Hiawatha, his family having removed 
to the latter place when he was a young child. Following 
his graduation from high school in 1914 he entered the 
University of Kansas, where he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1918. In 1922 he was graduated from 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 871 

the Medical School of Northwestern University and spent 
the following two years as an interne in Western Memorial 
Hospital, Chicago. In October, 1924, Doctor Good went 
to Kansas, but soon returned to Danville and opened an 
office in the Baum Building. In October, 1926, he removed 
to his present location, where he carries on a general 
practice. 

On April 15, 1922, Doctor Good married Miss Thelma 
Winkler, of Hiawatha, Kansas, the daughter of J. B. and 
Melvina (Atkins) Winkler. Mr. Winkler died in 1919 and 
his widow lives at Hiawatha. Doctor and Mrs. Good have 
no children. 

Politically, Doctor Good is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of St. James Methodist Church, and is affiliated with 
the Masonic Lodge and Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree. He is also a member of the Roselawn Country 
Club, Kappa Sigma and Phi Chi fraternities. 

Doctor Good is well known in Danville as a musician. 
Throughout his college life he was especially interested 
in band and glee club activities. 



Arthur H. Smith, one of Danville's most progressive 
young business men, is a veteran of the World War. He 
is well known in this city as secretary and treasurer of 
the Danville Coca Cola Bottling Company. Mr. Smith was 
born at Louisville, Kentucky, December 23, 1887, the son 
of Jacob J. and Mary (Mather) Smith. 

Jacob J. Smith was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and 
his wife is a native of Alsace-Lorraine. He was reared 
and educated at Louisville and was identified with the 
wholesale meat business, which had been established by 
his father. Mr. Smith also was live stock inspector in 
that city. He died in 1892 at the age of thirty-three years. 



872 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

His widow lives at Louisville. Their children were: Ella 
E., lives at home; and Arthur H., the subject of this sketch. 

Arthur H. Smith received his education in the public 
schools of Louisville, Kentucky. He began life as a news- 
boy and later clerked in the offices of the Louisville & 
Nashville Railroad, having entered the railroad's employ 
as an office boy. He later became a fireman on the road 
and finally engineer. In 1914 Mr. Smith accepted a posi- 
tion with the Coca Cola Company as a junior salesman 
in Louisville. After a year he went to West Virginia, 
where he remained with the company until 1917. In Janu- 
ary, 1918, he volunteered for service in the World War 
and served with the Thirty-ninth Engineers. He served 
in France as a member of a railroad transportation corps 
and was discharged July 8, 1919, with the rank of sergeant. 
He then re-entered the employ of the Coca Cola Company, 
at Atlanta, Georgia, and spent the following year as a 
salesman in Indiana. He returned to Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, in 1920 in charge of the sales department in that 
city and in 1924 was promoted to district manager, in 
charge of sales in Kentucky and Indiana. In September, 
1928, Mr. Smith was transferred to Danville in charge of 
the business in this city. He purchased the Hudenhoffer 
Coca Cola Bottling Company, which he completely reor- 
ganized. The plant was remodeled and its output has 
practically doubled since Mr. Smith has been owner of 
the business. A daily output of nine hundred and sixty 
cases is the record volume of business handled by this 
modern plant. Five motor trucks are in operation. 

On October 5, 1929, Mr. Smith married Miss Helen Gofi, 
of Danville, Illinois. 

Mr. Smith is affiliated with Willis Stewart Lodge, No. 
224, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; and is a member 
of the Commandery, and the Shrine at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky; American Legion; and Kiwanis Club. He is a 
Republican and a member of the Lutheran Church. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 873 

Frank W. Mason, M. D., is a representative member of 
the medical profession in Vermilion County and one of 
the leading citizens of Danville, where he has engaged in 
practice since 1920. He was born at Newark, Ohio, Febru- 
ary 10, 1866, the son of Jacob W. and Elizabeth Ann 
(Smith) Mason. 

Jacob W. Mason was a farmer all his life and lived in 
Licking County, Ohio, until 1881, at which time he moved 
with his family to Vermilion County, where he resided 
until his death in 1918. His wife died in 1926. Both are 
buried in Pleasant Grove Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Mason 
were the parents of six children: J. Smith, lives at Oak- 
wood, Illinois; Dr. James S., lives at Urbana, Illinois; Leora 
P., Archibald R., and Etta F., all live at Fithian, Illinois; 
and Frank M., the subject of this sketch. 

Frank M. Mason attended the public schools of Newark, 
Ohio, and was fifteen years old when his family settled 
in Vermilion County. He was a student of Wabash Col- 
lege at Crawfordsville, Indiana, and graduated from the 
Medical School of Northwestern University in 1894 and 
engaged in practice at Rossville, Illinois, with Dr. Michael 
T. Livingood until 1920 before locating in Danville. He 
has offices in the Temple Building. 

Doctor Mason was married June 26, 1894, at Rossville, 
to Miss Katherine E. Livingood, Rossville, Illinois, the 
daughter of Dr. Michael Tryon and Hannah E. (Ruth) 
Livingood, natives of Pennsylvania. Doctor Livingood, 
deceased, was a leading physician and surgeon of Eastern 
Pennsylvania and Vermilion County. There were five 
children in the Livingood family: Dr. John R., a noted 
physician and surgeon of Vermilion County, who died at 
Memphis, Tennessee, December 12, 1893; Ellen R., de- 
ceased; Katherine E. Mason; Anna R., lives at Danville; 
and Elizabeth, married Thomas Dies, of Memphis, Ten- 
nessee. To Doctor and Mrs. Mason have been born three 
children: Michael Livingood, physician and surgeon, 54 



874 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Erie Street, Chicago; Frank M., Jr., electrical engineer 
with Fairbanks, Morse & Company, Chicago, lives at 
Evanston, Illinois; and Katherine Livingood, married 
Eugene S. Lamm, of the E. C. Lamm Lumber Company, 
Danville. Both sons of Doctor and Mrs. Mason served 
in the World War, having seen active service with Base 
Hospital No. 12 for a period of twenty-three months, or 
until the signing of the Armistice. 

Doctor Mason is a member of the Vermilion County 
Medical Society; Illinois State Medical Society; American 
Medical Association; and is also a Fellow in the American 
College of Surgeons. 

Doctor Mason is a Democrat of Jeffersonian principles. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Masonic Lodge, thirty-second degree, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America, Ben Hur, 
and Kiwanis Club. 



Merle J. Watt. — One of Danville's prominent young 
men is Merle J. Watt, who is president of the Piggly 
Wiggly Vermilion County Corporation. He is a native of 
Illinois, born at Newton, October 14, 1899, the son of Wil- 
bert and Luta (Phillips) Watt. 

Wilbert Watt, who died in 1902, was a well known resi- 
dent of Newton, Illinois, for many years. He was born 
there and followed farming early in life. Later he learned 
the carpenter trade and was thus engaged at the time of 
his death in Deloris, Colorado, where he was forced to go 
a number of years earlier due to ill health. His wife died 
in 1906 and is buried at Newton, Illinois. They were the 
parents of five children: Russel E., lives at Danville; Dale 
L., a World War veteran, engaged in the lumber business 
at Neosho, Missouri; Virgil F., interior decorator, lives at 
Clinton, Indiana; Merle J., the subject of this sketch; and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 875 

Juanita, married Oliver Smith, a console artist engaged 
in radio work in New York City. 

Merle J. Watt was six years old when his family located 
in Danville. He attended Oaklawn and Elmwood schools 
and was a newsboy on the streets of Danville for eight 
years as a carrier of the Commercial News. He began his 
business career in the grocery store of George Rund, later 
was employed by Charles Koch, and the Danville Co- 
operative Society. In 1919 he formed a partnership with 
his uncle, L. W. Phillips, and opened a grocery and meat 
business at 2215 Henderson Street, Danville. After a few 
months the business was moved to 1901 East Main Street, 
and two years later Mr. Watt purchased the interests of 
his uncle and continued the business, also acquiring another 
store at 942 Harmon Avenue. In February, 1928, Mr. 
Watt sold out and took over the Wide Awake Grocery 
Store at 19 West Main Street, which was one of the oldest 
and best established groceries in the city. He is still the 
proprietor and owner of this establishment. In July, 1928, 
he formed the Piggly Wiggly Vermilion County Corpora- 
tion, and became its president. This concern owns and 
operates seven stores in Danville and employs approxi- 
mately thirty-five people. 

In 1921 Mr. Watt was united in marriage with Miss 
Edith Fay Myers, of Danville, the daughter of Charles and 
Mollie (Sisk) Myers, the former a native of Kansas and 
the latter a native of Indiana. Mr. Myers lives in Dan- 
ville and his wife lives in Detroit, Michigan. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Watt a son was born, Wilbert Charles Watt, born 
October 26, 1925. 

Mr. Watt is a member of the Third Church of Christ 
and his wife holds membership in the Presbyterian Church. 
He is affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge No. 38, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty- 
second degree; Gao Grotto; Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, No. 332; Isaac Walton League; A. B. C. 



876 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Club; and Walnut Hill Boat Club. He has always been a 
Republican in politics and served on the city council of 
Danville for two terms. 

Mr. Watt has a reputation throughout Vermilion Coun- 
ty as a breeder of thoroughbred German police doys and 
devotes much of his leisure time to this particular hobby. 



Melville R. Walker. — Among the well known and highly 
respected citizens of Danville is Melville R. Walker, who 
is identified with the Danville Lime & Cement Company. 
He was born at Rossville, Illinois, December 27, 1870, the 
son of Melville R. and Elizabeth (Weir) Walker. 

Melville R. Walker was born in London, England. In 
early life he was a farmer and later a general merchant. 
The last seventeen years of his business career were spent 
as a building contractor. He died at Rossville, Illinois, 
May 28, 1888, and his wife, born at York, Ontario, Canada, 
died October 21, 1916. Both are buried at Rossville. The 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Walker were: Minnie C, 
born April 20, 1866, died April 17, 1921; Clara M., born 
March 24, 1869, died July 12, 1913; MelvilleR., the subject 
of this sketch; and Irvy, born January 28, 1874, died in 
August, 1898. 

Melville R. Walker obtained his education in the public 
schools of Rossville. At twenty-two years of age he be- 
came interested in general contracting and followed that 
until 1903. He then engaged in the building material busi- 
ness in Danville, his business being known as the Danville 
Lime & Cement Company. It is located at 511 Oak Street. 
The firm does a large volume of business annually and 
Mr. Walker ranks among the city's representative busi- 
ness men. While a building contractor he erected Potomac 
High School, Rossville High School, and the Presbyterian 
Church at Rossville. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 877 

On January 22, 1876, Mr. Walker was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Grace C. Barnett, of Crawfordsville, In- 
diana, the daughter of Lewis W. and Mary Elizabeth (Mc- 
Intire) Barnett. The former died August 23, 1922, and the 
latter died August 4, 1919. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have five 
children, as follows: Mrs. Ralph Rouse, lives at Danville; 
Melville R., Jr., manager of the Danville Lime & Cement 
Company, Danville; L. C, secretary-treasurer of the Dan- 
ville Lime & Cement Company, Danville; E. M., general 
contractor, lives at Tulsa, Oklahoma; and C. W., con- 
nected with the engineering department of the Illinois 
Bell Telephone Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Politically, Mr. Walker is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church and Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 



James Culbert is numbered among the most successful 
pioneer business men of Rossville, where he has owned and 
managed greenhouses for the past thirty-three years. He 
was born in Scotland in August, 1844, the son of Peter 
Culbert. Both Peter Culbert and his wife were natives of 
Scotland, where they spent their entire lives. They are 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Culbert were the parents of seven 
children, only three of whom survive: James, the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Mary Marchmand, twin sister of James, 
lives at Saint Joseph, Missouri; and Mrs. Anna Kidd, lives 
at Green Ridge, Missouri. 

The boyhood of James Culbert was spent in Scotland, 
where he was educated. He also attended the public 
schools of Canada and was nineteeen years of age when he 
came to the United States. He became interested in gar- 
dening with his brother in Saint Louis, where he owned 
and operated a greenhouse until 1892. He then located 
at Danville, where he was employed by Al Giddings. In 
1896 Mr. Culbert came to Rossville, where he has since 



878 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ranked among the city's representative citizens. Although 
now eighty-five years of age he is still active in business 
affairs and is perhaps the oldest florist in the county. 

In 1880 Mr. Culbert married Miss Antoinette Johnson, 
of Saint Louis, Missouri. To them were born two children : 
Nettie, married William Strathman, lives at Danville; and 
John, lives at Rossville. 

John Culbert was born at Saint Louis, Missouri, Sep- 
tember 9, 1884, and was six years old when his family came 
to Vermilion County and settled in Danville. He attended 
the public schools of Danville and Rossville and since com- 
pleting his schooling has been interested in greenhouse 
work with his father. He was married December 25, 1913, 
to Miss Mabel Case, of Rossville, and they have two chil- 
dren: Robert Culbert, born in 1915; and James Culbert, 
born in 1922. Mr. Culbert is a Republican and has served 
as a member of the local school board. He is at present 
serving as a member of the Village Board. He holds mem- 
bership in the Methodist Church and is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Politically, Mr. Culbert has always been a Republican. 



L. H. Schlecht. — One of the best known business men 
of Vermilion County is L. H. Schlecht, who is secretary 
and treasurer of the Rossville Packing Company. He was 
born in Jefferson County, Missouri, February 26, 1885, the 
son of Louis and Louise (Schneider) Schlecht. 

Louis Schlecht was born in Jefferson County, Missouri, 
where he now lives retired. He was educated in Saint 
Louis and throughout his active career followed farming. 
He still lives on the farm where he spent his boyhood. 
His wife, born in Jefferson County, Missouri, died in 1887 
and is buried at Maxville, Missouri. To Louis and Louise 
(Schneider) Schlecht were born four children: Pauline, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 879 

married Louis Chartrau, lives at Saint Louis, Missouri; 
Cecelia, married Fred Hof, lives at Saint Louis, Missouri; 
Elizabeth, married Antone Broz, lives at Saint Louis, Mis- 
souri; and L. H., the subject of this sketch. By his second 
marriage Louis Schlecht had three children : Antone, who 
died in 1923; Charles; and Hubert, lives at Fenton, 
Missouri. 

L. H. Schlecht grew up on a farm in Jefferson County, 
Missouri, and attended the rural schools. He studied also 
at Bryant-Stratton Business College, Saint Louis, Mis- 
souri, and began his business career as a clerk in the 
employ of the Inland Type Foundry Company, Saint Louis. 
In March, 1904, he became associated with the Cudahy 
Packing Company as a stock clerk and resigned as assist- 
ant cashier in September, 1906. Mr. Schlecht's next busi- 
ness connection was with the Saint Louis Brewing Com- 
pany as assistant bookkeeper and cashier until October 3, 
1908, at which time he came to Hoopeston, Illinois, with the 
Hoopeston Malleable Iron Works. In March, 1910, Mr. 
Schlecht became identified with the city offices of Hoopes- 
ton and for a year was employed in the auditing of the 
records of Floral Hill Cemetery. On July 1, 1910, he be- 
came bookkeeper and cashier for the Hoopeston Canning 
Company and served in that capacity until February 1, 
1925, when he came to Rossville and purchased an interest 
in the Rossville Packing Company. The company has ap- 
proximately seven hundred and fifty acres under cultiva- 
tion and specializes in the raising of sweet corn, beans, 
beets, and asparagus. They employ two hundred and sev- 
enty-five men and women and have an output of five thou- 
sand cases per day. 

In 1910 Mr. Schlecht married Miss Mary Ernst, of 
Hoopeston, the daughter of John and Lena (Webler) 
Ernst. The former is deceased and the latter lives at Ross- 
ville. Mr. and Mrs. Schlecht have four children: Eugene, 



880 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

attends the University of Illinois; Mary Louise, Richard 
Ernest, and Eleanor Jane, all students. 

Mr. Schlecht is a Republican, a member of the Metho- 
dist Church, Masonic Lodge, and Hubbard Trail Country 
Club. 



Mrs. Rose C. Auth. — One of the best known women of 
Vermilion County is Mrs. Rose C. Auth, who is the efficient 
postmaster of Rankin. She was born near Rankin, in 
Iroquois County, the daughter of Thomas and Bridget 
(Carlon) Ruddy. 

Both Mr. Ruddy and his wife were born in Illinois. He 
followed general farming throughout his life and owned a 
large farm in Iroquois County. He removed to Rankin 
in 1904 and has since lived retired. His wife died in 1916 
and is buried in Union Cemetery, Rankin. Their children 
were as follows: Hugh, lives at Rankin; Ethel, at home; 
Catherine, married Frank Dorman, lives at Rankin; 
Rose C, the subject of this sketch; and Nellie, married 
James Henneberry, lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

Rose C. Ruddy was a young girl when her parents set- 
tled at Rankin. She attended the public schools of Ran- 
kin and in 1911 was graduated from the Rankin High 
School. She also attended Illinois State Normal College 
and was a teacher in the schools near Rankin for four 
years before her marriage. She was married June 11, 
1917, to William S. Auth, the son of Christopher and Mary 
(McGrath) Auth, the former a native of Illinois and the 
latter of Ireland. Mr. Auth lives retired at Sioux Falls, 
South Dakota. His wife is deceased. There were six chil- 
dren in the Auth family, as follows: John, a World War 
veteran, lives in Montana ; Joseph, lives at Mitchell, South 
Dakota; Sister Bernadetta, lives at Bridgewater, South 
Dakota ; Sister Sylvester, lives at Jefferson, South Dakota ; 




WILLIAM S. AL'TH 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 881 

Sister Boniface, lives at Aberdeen, South Dakota; and 
William S. 

William S. Auth enlisted for service in the World War 
and served in France with the Headquarters Company of 
the Second Division Regiment. He was taken ill while in 
service and died in France, February 10, 1919. He is 
buried in the American Cemetery, France. Mr. Auth was 
a prominent young man of Rankin and was serving as as- 
sistant postmaster under George A. Griffith at the time of 
his enlistment. He was educated at Normal, Illinois, and 
taught in the district schools of Vermilion County for sev- 
eral years. To Mr. and Mrs. Auth a son was born, Wil- 
liam, who died in infancy, December 5, 1918. 

Mrs. Auth was appointed postmaster of Rankin in 1919 
during the administration of President Woodrow Wilson. 
She was later reappointed to office during the Coolidge 
administration. 

Mrs. Auth is a member of Holy Trinity Catholic Church 
and Royal Neighbors. 



C. S. Wilson is one of the dependable and well known 
citizens of Rossville. He was born at Centerville, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 12, 1872, the son of Samuel and Martha 
(Shupe) Wilson. 

Samuel Wilson was a native of County Cork, Ireland, 
and his wife was a native of Pennsylvania. He attended the 
common schools of his native land and was sixteen years 
old when he came to America, accompanied by his sister, 
who was fourteen years of age. The voyage required thir- 
teen weeks and after their arrival in the United States 
they settled at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where Mr. Wil- 
son was employed in the building of Fort Pitt. He later 
became a general merchant and conducted a business at 
Sutterville, Pennsylvania, for a number of years. He 

22— Vol. 2 



882 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

retired in 1896 and removed to Pittsburgh, and later to 
Sutterville, Pennsylvania, where he died at the age of 
eighty-nine years. He was a Republican. Mr. Wilson's 
death occurred December 18, 1902, and his wife died Octo- 
ber 4, 1923. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson were born four chil- 
dren: William, lives at Burgettstown, Pennsylvania; C. 
S., the subject of this sketch; George Emerson, who met 
with an accidental death in 1919; and Margaret Olive, who 
died in infancy. 

C. S. Wilson received his education in the public schools 
of Centerville, Pennsylvania. He was employed in his 
father's store for a time and also was a newsboy. He be- 
came identified with the transportation department of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad about 1889 and followed the 
machinist's trade until 1912, at which time he came to Ross- 
ville as a machinist for the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Rail- 
road. About 1920 he was promoted to night roundhouse 
foreman and seven years later was appointed machinist 
inspector, in which capacity he now serves. 

February 26, 1901, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage 
at Mattoon, Illinois, with Miss Lenora Farris, born in Coles 
County, Illinois, March 14, 1883, the daughter of John and 
Laura (Byers) Farris. Mr. Farris was born in Clark 
County, Illinois, and died in 1910. His wife, born in Law- 
rence County, Indiana, lives at Bloomington, Illinois. 
Her father, George Byers, served in the Civil War. Two 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilson : John Samuel, 
who is manager of the W. F. Hall Printing Company, Chi- 
cago, Illinois, married Marie Fisher, of Chicago; and Mabel 
Olive, married Raymond Marth, lives in Chicago. She is 
a graduate of Rossville High School, German Deaconess 
Hospital, Chicago, and the Childrens Memorial Hospital, 
Chicago. She is a registered nurse. 

Mr. Wilson was elected town trustee of Rossville in 
April, 1927, and re-elected in May, 1929. He and his wife 
are leading members of the Christian Church, and he is 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 883 

affiliated with Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Ross- 
ville Lodge, No. 527; Danville Consistory; and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Mrs. Wilson is a member of East- 
ern Star, Past Matron in 1923, and belongs to the Nomad 
Club, of Rossville. 



E. C. Smith is perhaps one of the best known young 
business men of Rossville, where he is identified with the 
Rossville Motor Company. He was born here, December 
23, 1890, the son of George S. and Minnie (Smith) Smith, 

George S. Smith, deceased, was a native of Rossville, 
where he spent his entire life. He was a farmer and was 
numbered among the successful stockmen of Vermilion 
County. He died in 1904 and is buried at Rossville. His 
widow lives at Rossville. Mr. Smith was a Republican, a 
member of the Methodist Church, and Masonic Lodge. The 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith were : E. C, the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; and Josephine, who died at the age of 
three years. 

E. C. Smith was reared and educated at Rossville and 
later attended Culver Military Academy during 1908-09-10 
and upon his return to Rossville he entered the Farmers 
National Bank as a clerk. He became cashier in 1916 and 
was elected president of that institution in 1919. However, 
when the Farmers National Bank was merged with the 
First National Bank in June, 1924, Mr. Smith left the 
financial field and at that time acquired an interest in the 
Rossville Motor Company as manager. Since April, 1929, 
the company has also carried farm implements. They are 
local agents for the Buick automobile. 

On September 11, 1912, Mr. Smith was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Emma Louise Burhenn, of Dixon, Illinois, 
the daughter of J. P. and Emma Burhenn. Mr. Burhenn 
lives retired at Rossville. His wife died in December, 1928, 



884 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and is buried at Dixon. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have no chil- 
dren. 

Mr. Smith is a member of the Presbyterian Church and 
his wife is identified with the Lutheran Church. He is 
affiliated with Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge 
No. 527, Rossville; Morris Chapter, No. 216, Rossville; 
Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Ansar Shrine, 
Springfield, Illinois; and Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, No. 332. He is also a member of the Hoopeston 
and Rossville Country Clubs. Politically, he is a Repub- 
lican. 



Fred S. Austin, owner and editor of the Rossville Press, 
is recognized as one of the able newspaper men of Ver- 
milion County. He was born at Round Grove, Whiteside 
County, Illinois, May 12, 1885, the son of Wellington J. and 
Cora Belle (Simonson) Austin. 

Wellington J. Austin was a native of Pennsylvania, born 
November 21, 1855. His wife was born at Round Grove, 
Illinois, April 22, 1859. He was a graduate of Northwest- 
ern University, and for a number of years was a merchant 
at Clark, South Dakota. He later entered the government 
service in Chicago, Illinois. Mr. Austin died December 29, 
1918, and his wife died March 24, 1901. Both are buried 
in Mount Hope Cemetery, Chicago. Their children were: 
Fred S., the subject of this sketch; John W., lives in Chi- 
cago; Alice M., married Claude Thatcher, lives in Chicago; 
and Harold E., lives at Louisville, Kentucky. 

Fred S. Austin attended the public schools of Round 
Grove, Illinois, and Chicago. He was graduated from 
Englewood High School and began his business career as 
a stenographer. He later became interested in the news- 
paper business and in 1907 went to Saint Paul, Minnesota, 
and subsequently to Montana and Oregon. He became the 
owner of a newspaper at Havre, Montana, in 1915, and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 885 

later owned and edited numerous other publications in the 
West. He founded the Devil's Lake (North Dakota) World 
in 1916 and after three years went to Canton, Illinois, 
where he became editor of the Canton Daily Ledger. In 
1922 he took over the management of the Pekin (Illinois) 
Daily Times, and the following year came to Hoopeston as 
advertising manager of the Hoopeston Daily Times. Since 
July 3, 1925, Mr. Austin has been owner and editor of the 
Rossville Press. 

On May 12, 1917, Mr. Austin was united in marriage 
with Miss Gena Andrea Tovsrud, of Mayville, North Da- 
kota, the daughter of Jens R. and Anne (Endreud) 
Tovsrud, natives of Norway and residents of Harlow, 
North Dakota. 

Mr. Austin is independent in politics but usually votes 
the Republican ticket. He is a member of the Church of 
Christ and his wife holds membership in Saint Olaf 's Luth- 
eran Church. He is affiliated with Rossville Lodge No. 527, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Morris Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, No. 216; Irin Grotto; and Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows Cook County, No. 240. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Illinois Press Association and National Editorial 
Association. 



Cicero Alison. — One of the leading citizens of Vermilion 
County is Cicero Alison, who lives retired at Alvin. He 
was born in Vinton County, Ohio, January 12, 1854, the 
son of Mark M. and Sarah (Salmans) Alison. 

Mark M. Alison was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, 
and his wife was a native of Guernsey County, Ohio. He 
became a teacher in the schools of Jackson and Vinton 
counties, and after his marriage, March 8, 1849, he became 
interested in farming. He became the owner of large 
tracts of land and in 1864 came to Illinois, making the 
trip by horse and wagon. He located on land near Alvin, 



886 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and operated one hundred and sixty acres. He also 
became a minister of the Methodist Church and organ- 
ized the old Methodist Church at Alvin. He died in 1907 
at the age of eighty-three years and is buried at Manns 
Chapel, Rossville. His wife died in 1904. He was a Re- 
publican. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Alison: 
Sarah Margaret, married first to H. J. Stewart, later to 
Rev. A. G. Copeland, and she died April 17, 1895, in Okla- 
homa; Rachael Frances, died in December, 1894, was the 
wife of J. W. Salmans, of Danville, Illinois; Cicero, the 
subject of this sketch; and Almira E., died March, 1917. 

Cicero Alison grew up in Ohio and received his educa- 
tion in the district schools. At an early age he came to 
Illinois and settled on a farm near Alvin, where he re- 
mained until 1899. He then built a grain elevator at Alvin, 
which he successfully managed until 1912, when the busi- 
ness was sold to the Farmers Elevator Company, of Alvin. 
Mr. Alison then devoted his entire time to farming and at 
the present time is still owner of a fine farm of seventy 
acres near Alvin, as well as two hundred and forty acres 
farther east of the city. 

On February 23, 1879, Mr. Alison was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Barbara L. Allison, of Alvin, the daughter 
of Alfred and Cornelia Anne Allison. He died in 1922 and 
his wife died February 13, 1900. They were natives of 
Kentucky and North Carolina, respectively. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Allison were born nine children, as follows: 1. John 
R,. married Bessie Keefe, lives in Alvin. 2. Sarah Cor- 
nelia, married Elbert Roberts, lives at Alvin. 3. Daniel 
William, married Maude Cavin, lives at State Line. 4. 
Almira May, married W. W. Young, lives at Danville. 5. 
Emma Frances, married Dr. E. E. Howard, lives at Peoria, 
Illinois. 6. Cordelia Harriet, married H. A. Cunningham, 
who met with an accidental death in 1928. 7. Addie How- 
ard, married John 0. Ingram, lives at Danville. 8. Mary 
Ethel, married Clarence Carter, lives near Alvin. 9. L. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 887 

C. W., a graduate of the University of Illinois in the class 
of 1922. He married Helen Anderson, and they live at 
Westville, Illinois. 

Mr. Alison is identified with the Republican party in 
politics. He is a trustee of the Methodist Church and has 
served as a member of the local school board. 



Russell Young, who is serving as the efficient post- 
master of Rossville, is a veteran of the World War and one 
of the best liked young men of Vermilion County. He was 
born at Rossville, August 23, 1897, the son of Charles and 
Hettie (Maury) Young. 

Charles Young is well known at Rossville, where he is 
engaged in business. He was born at Bismarck, Illinois, 
and his wife is a native of Pennsylvania. He was reared 
at Rossville, and early in life became interested in the 
building business. He is also a plaster contractor. For 
a number of years Mr. Young was associated in business 
with his brother, Jim Young. The partnership was dis- 
solved in 1925. Mr. Young is a Republican. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Young were born the following children: Bess, a 
graduate of Rossville High School in 1910, now a teacher 
at Portland, Oregon; Russell, the subject of this sketch; 
Leslie, who died in 1911 ; and Inez, a graduate of Rossville 
High School in 1926, attends the University of Illinois. 

Russell Young attended the public schools of Rossville 
and after his graduation from high school in 1917 he en- 
listed for service in the World War, April 22, 1917. He 
was sent to Fort Sheridan, Illinois, and in September, 1917, 
was transferred to Camp Mills, Long Island. He saw 
active service in France and was later with the Army of 
Occupation in Germany. He was discharged from the 
service on May 13, 1919, and upon his return to Rossville 
entered the University of Illinois. He spent two years at 



888 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

that institution and in 1921 returned to Rossville. In 1923 
Mr. Young was appointed postmaster. 

On August 30, 1923, Mr. Young was united in marriage 
with Miss Marjorie Brown, of Danville, the daughter of 
Charles and Ella (Galloway) Brown. Mr. Brown lives at 
Indiana Harbor, Indiana. His wife died in 1922 and is 
buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Young have two sons : Charles Russell, born June 28, 1924; 
and John Richard, born February 7, 1928. 

Mr. Young is identified with the Republican party in 
politics. He is a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, and 
is affiliated with Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge 
No. 527, Rossville; and the American Legion, Lloyd K. 
Spears Post, No. 733. He is among the most popular young 
men of the community in which he has spent his entire life. 



Ernest J. Felgenhauer is among the popular and suc- 
cessful business men of Alvin, where he conducts a garage. 
He was born at Danville, Illinois, May 13, 1888, the son of 
Christ and Minnie (Stiebble) Felgenhauer. 

Christ Felgenhauer, a native of Germany, lives retired 
at Danville. He was eight years old when he emigrated 
to the United States with his parents and settled in Dan- 
ville. He was employed in the coal mines near Danville 
and about 1892 purchased a farm of eighty acres three 
miles northeast of Alvin. He remained there until 1923, 
when he sold the land and retired to Danville, where he 
resides at the present time. Mr. Felgenhauer is a Repub- 
lican and a member of the German Lutheran Church. He 
also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. His wife, born in 
Germany, died in March, 1925, and is buried in Oaklawn 
Cemetery, Danville. To Mr. and Mrs. Felgenhauer were 
born three children: Lewis, farmer, lives near Henning; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 889 

Ernest J., the subject of this sketch ; and Esther, married 
Fred Witte, lives at Hammond, Indiana. 

Ernest J. Felgenhauer attended the district schools and 
is a graduate of Brown's Business College, Danville. He 
remained on his father's farm for several years, and began 
his business career with his father-in-law, F. M. Ogdon, 
grocer, with whom he was identified from 1913 until 1923. 
He then became interested in the garage business and on 
November 1, 1925, removed to Main Street, where he had 
purchased the building of the Brown Brothers, of Bis- 
mark. Mr. Felgenhauer handles a complete line of auto- 
mobile accessories and renders battery and tire service. 
He also handles radios. 

In 1913 Mr. Felgenhauer was married at Danville to 
Miss Nellie Ogdon, of Alvin, the daughter of Frank and 
Anna Ogdon. 

Politically, Mr. Felgenhauer is a Republican. He at- 
tends the Christian Church. He is an ardent baseball fan 
and takes an active interest in local sporting activities. 



Frank E. Yeazel. — Perhaps one of the best known and 
most successful business men of Alvin is Frank E. Yeazel, 
who is president of the Village Board. He was born at 
Alvin, October 29, 1887, the son of William A. and Ellen 
(Green) Yeazel. 

William A. Yeazel was born near Homer, Illinois. He 
lived in Ohio for a number of years and later came to Illi- 
nois, where he engaged in general farming near Rossville. 
Subsequently, he settled on land near Alvin, where he lived 
for more than half a century. He died in 1923 at the age 
of seventy-three years and is buried at Manns Chapel, 
Rossville. His widow resides at Alvin. The following 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Yeazel: Clark, lives 
at Danville; May, married Clarence Teagarden, lives at 



890 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Newport, Kentucky; George, who died in 1918; Earl, who 
died at the age of twenty years; Fannie, married E. A. 
Peterson, lives at Alvin; Ethel, married Charles Mathews, 
lives near Alvin; Frank E., the subject of this sketch; 
Abbie, died in March, 1929, was the wife of Harold Cray- 
ton, who died in 1920; and Ralph A., lives at Danville. 

Frank E. Yeazel was reared on a farm just west of 
Alvin and obtained his education in the district schools. 
For a few years he was interested in farming and later 
entered the railway mail service. In 1914 he became man- 
ager of the Farmers Grain Company and two years later 
organized the Alvin Grain & Electric Company, Inc. 
He had complete charge of the installation of electric serv- 
ice in Alvin and in 1918 the service was extended to Bis- 
marck, Illinois, and State Line, Indiana. Two years later 
Mr. Yeazel sold his interests in the grain business which he 
had established and devoted his entire time to the Alvin 
Light & Power Company. The business has expanded dur- 
ing the past few years and now has lines to Hedrick, West 
Newell, Illinois, and Rence, Indiana. Service was extended 
to Armstrong and Henning in 1925 when the R. C. Wilson 
Light Company was purchased. Mr. Yeazel, however, sold 
these properties, and is now interested in the coal, tile 
and cement business. 

On October 15, 1910, Mr. Yeazel married Miss Grace 
Swisher, of Rossville, Illinois, the daughter of Chester and 
Ella (Maury) Swisher, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Swisher died in 1914 and his widow lives at Rossville. Mr. 
and Mrs. Yeazel have no children. 

Mr. Yeazel is a Republican and served as president of 
the Alvin School Board in 1928. He was elected president 
of the Village Board on April 16, 1929. He and his wife 
hold membership in the Christian Church, and he also be- 
longs to the Isaac Walton League. 

In 1926 Mr. Yeazel built one of the finest homes in this 
section of the county. It is of brick structure and is at- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 891 

tractively located on ten acres of land in the west end of 
the town. Attractive landscaping and extensive gardens 
make it outstanding as one of the beauty spots in the 
community. 



Oscar Thomas. — Numbered among the most enterpris- 
ing and successful farmers of Vermilion County is Oscar 
Thomas, who is the owner of a fine farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres on the Attica Road near Rossville. He 
has spent his entire life in this section of Illinois, born at 
Rossville, September 18, 1867, the son of Samuel and Clara 
(Bicknell) Thomas. 

Samuel Thomas, deceased, was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, born near Philadelphia. He came to Rossville when a 
young man and settled on land, which he farmed for many 
years. He died at the age of sixty-one years in 1895 and is 
buried at Rossville. His wife, a native of Rossville, died 
in 1909. To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas were born the following 
children : Oscar, the subject of this sketch ; William, who 
died at the age of six years; Amelia, died at the age of 
twenty-four years ; Charles, farmer, lives on the old home- 
stead; Edward, died at the age of twenty-two years; 
George, farmer, lives in Vermilion County; Mary, married 
Ross Fetters, lives near Rossville; and Frank, who lives in 
Wyoming. 

Oscar Thomas grew up on his father's farm and re- 
ceived his education in the district schools. At the age 
of twenty-two years he rented the Byron Cronhite farm, in 
partnership with his two brothers. They operated that 
land for thirteen years, after which Mr. Thomas purchased 
the old Sulle farm on the Attica Roard about one-half a 
mile from Rossville. He has continued to operate this 
farm and ranks among the able stockmen of the township. 

In 1889 Mr. Thomas was united in marriage with Miss 
Emma Hackman, of Rossville, the daughter of Ezra and 



892 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Amelia Hackman, the former a native of Pennsylvania 
and the latter of Indiana. Mr. Hackman died in 1923 and 
his wife died in 1919. Both are buried at Rossville. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas were born three children: Cecil, a 
graduate of Rossville High School, married Verda Robel- 
ing, and they live near Rossville ; Hazel, lives at home ; and 
Flossie, married Henry Wood, farmer, lives east of Bis- 
marck, Illinois. 

Mr. Thomas has always been a Republican. He and his 
family hold membership in the Methodist Church and have 
a wide acquaintance in the community. 



H. M. Daniels, who is identified with the H. M. Daniels 
Lumber Company, of Henning, is among the enterprising 
and progressive business men of Vermilion County. He 
was born in Douglas County, Illinois, November 7, 1875, 
the son of S. W. and Mary E. (Baker) Daniels. 

S. W. Daniels, retired, is a native of Illinois. He was 
born in Douglas County and lived there until 1915, at which 
time he went to Foster, Missouri, where he engaged in 
farming until his recent retirement. He is a Republican 
and a member of the Methodist Church. Mary E. (Baker) 
Daniels was born in Kentucky and died in 1916. She is 
buried at Foster, Missouri. There were five children in the 
Daniels family: H. M., the subject of this sketch; Forest 
Elmer, lives at New Iberia, Louisiana; Viola, married 
Alonzo Fields, lives at Connersville, Indiana; T. 0., lives 
at Rich Hill, Missouri; and Fay, married A. 0. Schaede, 
lives at Urbana, Illinois. 

H. M. Daniels obtained his education in the district 
schools of Douglas County, Illinois, and grew up on his 
father's farm. He took a business course after his gradua- 
tion from high school and then entered the offices of the 
F. H. Jones Lumber Company, at Tuscola, Illinois. He 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 893 

spent six years in that company's employ and then became 
manager of the lumber yards of Potter & Phelps. Later, 
he associated with the S. E. Huff Lumber Company, 
Urbana, Illinois, and in March, 1927, purchased his present 
business at Henning. The H. M. Daniels Lumber Company 
has an extensive trade throughout this section of Illinois 
and in Indiana and are dealers in all types of building 
materials, roofings, wire fencings, tile and cement. 

On June 14, 1899, Mr. Daniels was united in marriage 
with Miss Ola Smith, of Tuscola, Illinois, who died Decem- 
ber 13, 1908. She was the daughter of Ezra and Catherine 
(Porter) Smith. The former died in 1906 and the latter 
in 1923. To H. M. and Ola (Smith) Daniels a daughter 
was born, Mildred Catherine. She is the wife of Washing- 
ton Jenner, of Riverside, California. Mr. Daniels was 
married the second time on July 19, 1911, at Huntington, 
Indiana, to Esther Reed, the daughter of William and 
Nancy (Walker) Reed. He died in 1910 and his wife died 
in 1923. To Mr. and Mrs. Daniels a son has been born, 
George M., born July 16, 1916. 

Mr. Daniels is a Republican and is serving the third 
term as alderman. He and his wife hold membership in 
the Baptist Church and he is a member of Ben Hur Lodge, 
Urbana, Illinois. 



John Vinton Lane. — Honored, respected and esteemed 
in Henning, John Vinton Lane, deceased, was one of the 
borough's most prominent men. He was born in Vinton 
County, Ohio, March 3, 1858, the son of Royal Hasting and 
Mary (Brewer) Lane. 

Royal Hasting Lane was born in Ohio. He came to 
Illinois in 1865 and purchased a farm east of Higginsville, 
where he remained until 1904. He then removed to Hen- 
ning, where he lived retired until his death in 1905. His 
wife, also born in Ohio, died in 1894. Both are buried at 



894 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Potomac, Illinois. Their children were: Laura E., who 
died in 1907; Lidora Alice, died in 1918, was the wife of 
John Goodwine, of Potomac, who died in 1924; Douglas 
M., farmer, lives near Armstrong, Illinois; and John Vin- 
ton, the subject of this sketch. 

John Vinton Lane was six years old when he came to 
Illinois with his parents. He attended the district schools 
of Higginsville and remained on the home place until his 
marriage in 1886. He then settled on the Rickart farm, 
southwest of Henning, which is among the oldest home- 
steads in this section of Vermilion County. It is the pater- 
nal home of Mrs. Lane. Mr. Lane became a successful 
farmer and stockman and became the owner of eight hun- 
dred acres of land. He died in 1923 at the age of sixty-five 
years. 

In 1886 Mr. Lane married Miss Hettie J. Rickart, of 
Henning, the daughter of Wilson V. and Hester A. (Craw- 
ford) Rickart. He was born in Butler County, Ohio, and 
died in 1911. She was a native of Athens County, Ohio, 
and died in 1895. Both are buried in Bethel Cemetery, near 
Danville, Illinois. Three sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lane: Wilson Vivian, married Lillian M. Dodson, lives 
near Henning, and they have three children, Ralph E., 
Beryl K., and Vivienne M.; Victor Royal, married Minnie 
R. Niswonger, lives near Henning, and they have two 
daughters, Martha L. and Marian E.; and Carroll John, 
lives near Henning, married Emma Corbett, and they have 
three children, John R., Willa F. and Phillip E. All are 
engaged in farming. 

Mr. Lane was a Democrat in early life and later in life 
became identified with the Prohibition movement. He held 
membership in the United Brethren Church. Mrs. Lane 
is a member of the Free Methodist Church, Missionary 
Society, and Women's Christian Temperance Union. She 
has been a resident of Henning since 1925. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 895 

Elmer McNeal. — One of the substantial business men 
and well known citizens of Henning is Elmer McNeal, who 
is identified with the Henning Grain Company. He was 
born at Chestnut, Illinois, September 9, 1886, the son of 
Frank and Olla (McCurdy) McNeal. 

Frank McNeal was a native of Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and his wife was born in Macon County, Illinois. 
He was ten years old when he came to Illinois with his 
parents and settled near Maroa, Illinois. He followed 
general farming and stock raising throughout his life and 
later lived retired at Chestnut. He died in 1919 at the 
age of sixty-six years. His wife died in 1924. Both are 
buried at Mount Pulaski, Illinois. Mr. McNeal was a Dem- 
ocrat and a member of the Methodist Church. Two chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. McNeal: Elmer, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Pearl, married H. D. Lukenbill. 
lives at Springfield, Illinois. 

Elmer McNeal spent his boyhood on a farm near Chest- 
nut, Illinois, and received his education in the district 
schools. He also attended a business college at Decatur? 
Illinois, and began his business career as a bookkeeper 
with the Standard Oil Company at Decatur. Two years 
later he became interested in farming, but in 1912 engaged 
in business at Chestnut Hill, Illinois, as manager of a grain 
company. In 1916 he disposed of his interests there and in 
March, 1917, came to Henning, where he purchased an 
interest in the grain business of Mr. Prillman, of Rossville. 
He became manager of the local elevator and in 1923 this 
business was consolidated with the grain business of A. E. 
Betts. The old elevators were torn down and new ele- 
vators built, the firm being incorporated as the Henning 
Grain Company. Mr. McNeal became secretary and treas- 
urer. Mr. Prillman is the president of the company and 
Ura Seeger, of West Lebanon, Indiana, is vice president. 
This well established firm also are dealers in coal. 



896 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

In December, 1909, Mr. McNeal was united in marriage 
with Miss Bessie Keagle, of Mt. Pulaski, 111., the daughter 
of Page and Anna (Barr) Keagle. Mr. Keagle died in 
1923 and his wife died in 1912. Both are buried at Mount 
Pulaski. Mr. and Mrs. McNeal have no children. 

Mr. McNeal has always been a Democrat and has served 
as mayor of Henning, being elected to that office in 1922. 
He is a member of the Henning Methodist Church, and is 
affiliated with the Mount Pulaski Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory; Mohammed Tem- 
ple Shrine, Peoria, Illinois; and Knights of Pythias, of 
Henning, Illinois. 



Thomas George Luxton, who is president of the East 
Lynn State Bank, is representative of the successful busi- 
ness men of Vermilion County. He was born at Hather- 
leigh, Devonshire, England, September 4, 1844, the son 
of George and Mary (Pedrick) Luxton. 

George Luxton and his wife were born in Devonshire 
County, England. He was highly educated and prepared 
for the ministry, although he never entered that profes- 
sion. He became a prosperous farmer. Both he and his 
wife are deceased. They had the following children: 
Elizabeth, William, Bartholomew, Amy, Walter, Anne, 
Mary, Catherine, Thomas George, George, Richard, and 
John, who died in 1919. All are deceased except Thomas 
George, the subject of this sketch. 

Thomas George Luxton received his education in the 
schools of England and Canada. He came to the United 
States in 1867 and located at Portland, Maine. Early in 
life he followed the blacksmith's trade and in 1875 removed 
from Canada to East Lynn, where he conducted a shop 
for a time. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
land in Butler Township, Vermilion County. In 1878 Mr. 




MR. AND MRS. THOMAS GEORGE LUXTON 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 897 

Luxton returned to England and was married. Upon his 
return to East Lynn in that year he again conducted his 
shop and engaged in general farming and stock raising. 
In 1909 he retired and has since lived at East Lynn. Mr. 
Luxton is the owner of 1900 acres of fine farm land and 
has extensive real estate holdings. 

At the organization of the East Lynn Bank Mr. Lux- 
ton was elected president. He retained that office after 
the incorporation of the bank in 1921. 

On June 5, 1878, Mr. Luxton married Miss Johanna 
Martin, daughter of Samuel Martin, a native of Cornwall, 
England. Mrs. Luxton died in 1920 and is buried at East 
Lynn. To this union were born four children : Mary, mar- 
ried Edward Mutton, lives in Vermilion County; George T., 
farmer, lives at East Lynn; Mabel, married Frank Mc- 
Cord, cashier of the East Lynn State Bank; and Walter, 
lives at East Lynn. Mr. Luxton was married the second 
time to Ida Hutton, the daughter of John Hutton, of Lock- 
port. She died in 1922 and is buried at East Lynn. Mr. 
Luxton's third marriage was to Mrs. Alta Staley, a native 
of Lafayette, Indiana, and a daughter of John and Phoebe 
(Minard) Roberts. Mrs. Luxton was educated in Lafay- 
ette High School and Terre Haute Normal, and for twenty- 
three years was a school teacher. She taught one term in 
Porto Rico, and two terms at East Lynn. Mrs. Luxton was 
first married in 1897 to J. Clifford Staley and two children 
were born to this union, Mrs. Lucille Montross and John 
R. Staley. 

Mr. Luxton is a Republican and is the oldest living 
Republican Central Committeeman of Vermilion County, 
having served for nearly a half century, a member of the 
Methodist Church, Knights of Pythias, and has other club 
affiliations. He has always manifested a keen interest in 
church and school work and it was largely through his ef- 
forts that the new Methodist Church and East Lynn High 

23— Vol. 2 



898 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

School were erected. He is widely known for his philan- 
thropic work and has been an important factor in the busi- 
ness, civic and social life of his community. 



Edwin G. Harden is one of the young business men of 
Fithian who has achieved success in the automobile busi- 
ness. He was born at Covington, Indiana, December 16, 
1889, the son of Eugene and Dora (Kistler) Harden. 

Eugene Harden was born at Homer, Illinois, in 1858. 
He spent most of his life at Covington, Indiana, and for 
a number of years served as superintendent of the Coving- 
ton Power & Light Company. He met with an accidental 
death in 1915, and is buried at Covington. His widow 
lives at Covington, where she was born. Mr. and Mrs. 
Harden were the parents of four sons: 0. C, lives at 
Tulona, Illinois; F. R., lives at Covington, Indiana; Edwin 
G., the subject of this sketch; and 0. J., lives at Long 
View, Illinois. It is interesting to note that these four 
sons have the agency for the Ford automobile in their 
respective communities. 

Edwin G. Harden received his education in the public 
schools of Covington and following his graduation from 
high school in 1911 entered a garage at Covington as an 
apprentice mechanic. He came to Fithian in 1913 as a 
salesman for C. B. DeLong, Ford agent, and served in 
that capacity for ten years. In December, 1924, he pur- 
chased the interests of Mr. DeLong and assumed entire 
control of the business. The territory embraces Vance, 
Ogden, Pilot, and Oakwood townships. Approximately 
four hundred cars are sold by the company annually and 
Mr. Harden employs six men besides his office force. In 
1927 he purchased a half interest in the Ford agency at 
Villa Grove, and he is now establishing a new Ford agency 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 899 

at Homer, Illinois, in partnership with his brother, 0. C. 
Harden. 

In 1912 Mr. Harden was united in marriage with Miss 
Ruth M. Wuthrick, of Covington, Indiana, the daughter 
of Leo and Cora (Russell) Wuthrick. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Harden have been born ten children, as follows: Marjorie 
May, Nadine, Freida, Halma Marie, Edwin G., Jr., Gene, 
Mary Jane, Virginia, Martha Anne, and Vera Louise, all at 
home. 

Mr. Harden is a Republican and is serving as a member 
of the Village Board. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church, and belongs to the Masonic Lodge. 



Jesse Stone. — One of the outstanding citizens of Poto- 
mac, well known through all the surrounding country, is 
Jesse Stone, proprietor of the Jesse Stone Store. He was 
born at Dewitt, Illinois, September 17, 1871, the son of 
W. E. and Caroline (Day) Stone. 

W. E. Stone was born at Harrodsburg, Kentucky. He 
was reared on a plantation in Kentucky and was seventeen 
years old when he came to Illinois and settled at Dewitt. 
He made the trip from Kentucky on horseback and after 
his arrival here he became interested in farming and cattle 
feeding. When twenty-one years of age, however, he en- 
gaged in the general mercantile business at Dewitt. He 
met with financial reverses and in 1879 went to Seymour, 
Illinois, but in 1882 purchased eighty acres of the John 
Hanson farm near Armstrong, Illinois, at thirty dollars 
per acre. He remained there for nine years and in 1891 
settled at Potomac, where he conducted a livery business. 
He also became interested in the lumber and coal business 
and was thus engaged at the time of his retirement in Jan- 
uary, 1899. He then turned over his business to his sons, 
Charles M. and Jesse Stone. Mr. Stone died September 17, 



900 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

1924, and his wife, a native of Dewitt, Illinois, died Decem- 
ber 14, 1908. Both are buried at Potomac. Mr. Stone was 
a Democrat and served as a member of the village board 
for twenty-six years and as supervisor for one term. He 
was also a member of the school board. He held member- 
ship in the Methodist Church, and was a very popular, 
energetic, and well liked man. To W. E. and Caroline 
(Day) Stone were born five children: Jesse, the subject of 
this sketch; E. C, lives at Montgomery, Alabama, where 
he is interested in hog raising; Charles M., former partner 
of Jesse, now connected with the International Harvester 
Company, Danville ; William G., lives at Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia; and Cecil, married Homer Wilson, lives at Saint 
Joseph, Illinois. 

Jesse Stone lived at Dewitt, Illinois, until he was eight 
years old. He then went to Seymour, Illinois, with his par- 
ents and in 1892, after completing his early schooling, 
entered Illinois State Normal School. He taught for six 
years in the district schools at seventy-five dollars per 
month, and in June, 1898, entered into business with his 
father. After a year the business was taken over by the 
two sons and they also added a lumber and coal business 
at Armstrong, Illinois, which was managed by Charles 
Stone until January 1, 1909, at which time the partnership 
was dissolved and Charles Stone took over the Armstrong 
business. Jesse Stone remained in charge and as owner of 
the Potomac business house. In 1911 he erected a new 
brick and concrete store and warehouse, which is probably 
among the largest stores of its kind in Vermilion County, 
outside of the city of Danville. He handles a complete line 
of hardware, builders' supplies, lumber, coal, farm machin- 
ery, tile, sewer pipe, sand, and gravel, and also contracts 
for building. 

On December 25, 1894, Mr. Stone was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Josie Smith, of Henning, Illinois, the 
daughter of George G. and Eliza (Fairchild) Smith. Mr. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 901 

Smith was born south of Henning, Illinois, and died in 1911. 
His wife, born on the Fairchild homestead near Fairchild 
Chapel, died in 1913. Both are buried at Potomac. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stone have two children, George W. and Helen A., 
mention of whom is made below. 

George W. Stone was born March 21, 1896. He is a 
graduate of Urbana High School and the University of 
Illinois. He enlisted for service in the World War, April 
3, 1917, as a member of the United States Naval Aviation 
Corps, being the first boy from Potomac to enlist. He was 
sent to Pensacola, Florida, where he was among the first 
one hundred men to enlist in that school of aviation. He 
served throughout the entire war period and was dis- 
charged with the rank of lieutenant in August, 1919, with 
one thousand hours in the air to his credit. He married 
Miss Nellie Duval, of Urbana, Illinois, and they have three 
children. Mr. Stone is associated with the Milford Can- 
ning Company, at Milford, Illinois, as an expert produc- 
tion man. This is the largest sweet corn canning company 
in the world. 

Helen A. Stone is a graduate of Potomac High School, 
Ward-Belmont College, Nashville, Tennessee, and the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. She was a teacher in Colorado for four 
years before her marriage. She is the wife of Norval 
Burke, and they have a son. They live at Potomac. 

Mr. Stone is a member of the Methodist Church and his 
wife is president of the Ladies' Aid Society and secretary 
of the Foreign Missionary Society. He is affiliated with 
Potomac Lodge, No. 782, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Danville Consistory; and Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

In 1916 Mr. Stone helped organize the Potomac 
Township High School and has served on the old Potomac 
School Board for a number of years. He was president 
of the old School Board and secretary of the High School. 



902 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

J. F. Friend, who is station agent for the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois Railroad at Jamesburg, is one of the sub- 
stantial men of Vermilion County. He was born at Xenia, 
Illinois, February 16, 1882, the son of Albert and Sarah 
(Rheor) Friend. 

Albert Friend, who died in 1913, was a native of West 
Virginia. His widow, born in West Virginia, lives at 
Xenia, Illinois. Mr. Friend was a farmer in early life but 
later conducted and owned a barber shop at Xenia. He 
died at the age of sixty-one years. He was a Democrat. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Friend were born five children: Bertha, 
married Christ Henderson, lives at Xenia, Illinois; Gus, 
lives at Flora, Illinois; J. F., the subject of this sketch; 
A. W., lives at Springfield, Missouri; and Ollie, married 
Earl Amerine, lives at Detroit, Michigan. 

J. F. Friend was educated in the public schools of 
Xenia, Illinois, and when a very young man entered the 
employ of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Xenia, Illi- 
nois, where he learned telegraphy. He became an operator 
at the age of twenty years and after two years was trans- 
ferred from Xenia to Missouri as an operator for the Rock 
Island Railroad. After several years he returned to Illi- 
nois and entered the service of the Chicago & Eastern Illi- 
nois Railroad at Salem, Illinois. In January, 1916, he came 
to Jamesburg, where he has since been in charge of the 
local station. Mr. Friend also operates a fine farm of four 
hundred and fifty acres just east of Jamesburg. He is 
recognized as a highly successful farmer and specializes 
in the raising of wheat, oats and corn. He employs two 
men on his farm. Mr. Friend maintains his home in Dan- 
ville, located on North Grant Street. He also owns busi- 
ness property in Danville and for a number of years owned 
two barber shops there, one of which was sold by him 
in 1928. 

Mr. Friend was married first on November 4, 1903, to 
Miss Ethel Wooldridge, who died March 25, 1923. She is 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 903 

buried at Potomac. She was the daughter of W. M. and 
Alice (Edgington) Wooldridge, natives of Virginia. He 
died in 1911 and she died in 1929. Both are buried at 
Xenia, Illinois. To J. F. and Ethel (Wooldridge) Friend 
were born four children: William L., a graduate of Hen- 
ning High School, lives at Detroit, Michigan; Kenneth A., 
a graduate of Potomac High School, lives at Detroit, Mich- 
igan; Roselle, a graduate of Xenia High School, lives at 
Xenia; and LaVonne, attends school at Xenia. The two 
daughters make their home with their grandmother, Mrs. 
Albert Friend, of Xenia. Mr. Friend was married the sec- 
ond time to Leora Watson, of Danville, Illinois, in April, 
1927. She is the daughter of Gus and Jennie (Daniels) 
Watson, natives of Illinois. He died in 1919 and his widow 
lives at Danville. 

Mr. Friend has served as justice of the peace at James- 
burg for the past twelve years. He is a Republican in 
politics, a member of the Methodist Church, and Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows. He is serving his third term as 
a member of the local school board and is recognized as 
one of the popular members of the community. 



William Walter, retired, is known in Henning as one of 
the substantial pioneer citizens of Vermilion County. He 
was born at Ripley, West Virginia, March 3, 1851, the son 
of Simon and Lydia A. (Hornbeck) Walter. 

Simon Walter was born near Evansville, West Virginia. 
He was reared on a farm and attended the district school. 
In 1852 he came to Illinois with his family and settled on 
a farm near Armstrong, where he remained until he 
retired and moved to Potomac a few years before his 
death. He died in April, 1902, at the age of seventy-nine 
years. His wife is also deceased. They were the parents 
of the following children: Perry, deceased; Henry, lives 



904 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

retired at Murray, Iowa; William, the subject of this 
sketch; Mary E., married Joseph Cook, who died in 1928, 
and she lives at Armstrong, Illinois; Nancy J., married 
Joseph Hobbs, lives at Clarks Hill, Indiana; and Joseph, 
who died in infancy. 

The boyhood of William Walter was spent on a farm 
near Armstrong, Illinois. He attended the district schools 
and for eight years was a teacher in the schools of Ver- 
milion County. In 1884 he purchased a farm of eighty 
acres near Henning, where he lived for seventeen years. 
He then traded this farm for one hundred and sixty acres 
near Rankin, Illinois, which he operated for a period of 
twenty years. He has since lived retired at Henning, hav- 
ing moved here in 1921. He is the owner of two hundred 
and forty-one acres of land in Butler Township. 

On March 2, 1880, Mr. Walter married Miss Emma 
Layton, of Potomac, Illinois, the daughter of Aaron and 
Charlotte (Balcom) Layton, the former a native of Broome 
County, New York, and the latter of Pennsylvania. He died 
September 7, 1873, and his wife died January 9, 1915. Both 
are buried at Potomac. Mr. and Mrs. Layton were the 
parents of the following children: Warren A., born June 
10, 1846, died April 28, 1851; Caroline B., who died Sep- 
tember 5, 1875, was the wife of Charles LaGrange, a Civil 
War veteran; Silas B., born May 20, 1853, died January 27, 
1873; Emma Layton Walter, born August 5, 1857; John, 
born November 27, 1859, died July 10, 1926; and Laura 
Judy, born May 27, 1863, the widow of Charles Judy, who 
died in 1915. She lives at Goodwine, Illinois. To William 
and Emma (Layton) Walter were born five children, as 
follows: Cecil Earl, born October 22, 1881, married Feb- 
ruary 4, 1920, to Fay Blanche Matthew, is a veteran of the 
World War, lives at Danville, Illinois; Carrie Belle, born 
October 13, 1883, married Dr. A. O. Sistler, lives at Wel- 
lington, Illinois; Dean Harold, born September 8, 1891, 
married September 4, 1927, to Edna Wallen, of Henning, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 90b 

lives at Danville, and he is a veteran of the World War; 
Aaron Layton, born September 5, 1893, married Emma 
Edith Thompson, of Collision, Illinois, lives at Royal, Illi- 
nois; and Aubrey S., born March 13, 1895, married in 1921, 
to Gertrude Little of Rankin, Illinois. He is a farmer and 
lives near Bosville, Indiana. 

Mr. Walter has always been a Republican and cast his 
first vote for President Ulysses S. Grant. He is a member 
of the Methodist Church. Both he and his wife are high- 
ly esteemed members of the community in which they have 
spent so many years. They will have the honor of cele- 
brating their golden wedding anniversary in 1930. 



Frank Golliday is among the esteemed citizens of Poto- 
mac, where he has spent practically his entire life. He 
was born at Columbus, Ohio, July 11, 1864, the son of 
Jackson and Jane (O'Hale) Golliday. 

Jackson Golliday was one of the earliest settlers of 
Potomac. He was born in Columbus, Ohio, as was also 
his wife. When he was ten years of age his parents 
brought him to Potomac, at that time known as Marysville. 
He became a farmer, but after several years returned to 
Columbus, Ohio. Five years later, however, he removed 
again to Potomac, and from 1865 until his death two years 
later was a resident of this place. His wife died in 1894. 
Both are buried at Potomac. To Mr. and Mrs. Golliday 
were born four children : Thomas, who died at the age of 
sixteen years; Nellie, married Douglas Alexander, retired, 
lives at Potomac; Martin, died in infancy; and Frank, the 
subject of this sketch. 

Frank Golliday has lived at Potomac for many years. 
He received his education in the schools here and has lived 
in the same house for almost sixty years. Since 1899 he 
has served as sexton of the Potomac Cemetery. He is well 



906 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

known and well liked in the community. Mr. Golliday 
has a fine library in his home and has always spent much 
of his spare time in reading. He is also interested in the 
gathering of Indian relics and has quite an unusual collec- 
tion. 

In 1887 Mr. Golliday was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Weiser, of Potomac, the daughter of George and 
Nancy (Offord) Weiser, the former a native of Ohio and 
the latter of Virginia. Mr. Weiser died in 1924 and his 
wife died in 1905. They are buried at Potomac. Mrs. 
Frank Golliday died in 1917 and is buried in Potomac 
Cemetery. She had the following children: Blanche, who 
died in April, 1928, was the wife of Alfred Talbott; Lloyd 
F., lives at Bloomington, Illinois; and Ida, unmarried, lives 
at home. 

Mr. Golliday is a Republican, and has held membership 
in the Methodist Church of Potomac since 1884. He has 
been affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America for 
the past thirty years. 



J. Smith Mason. — Among the prominent business men 
of Oakwood is J. Smith Mason, who is identified with the 
Mason & Trent Brothers Lumber and Hardware Com- 
pany. He was born in Licking County, Ohio, October 19, 
1863, the son of Jacob W. and Elizabeth A. (Smith) Mason. 

Jacob W. Mason's sketch appears elsewhere in this 
history in the biography of his son, Dr. Frank M. Mason. 

J. Smith Mason was educated in the district schools of 
Licking County, Ohio. He came to Oakwood in 1881 and 
spent several years in the teaching profession, being 
located at Hope, Pleasant Grove, and Welcome. He also 
engaged in general farming and during the summer 
months attended the Teachers' Institute. He later became 
interested in business at Glenburn, Illinois, as manager of 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 907 

the Glenburn Coal Company. In 1898 he returned to the 
old homestead and continued farming until 1913, at which 
time he removed to Oakwood and purchased an interest 
in the Trent Brothers & Elliott Lumber and Hardware 
Company. The business was thereafter known as the 
Mason & Trent Brothers Lumber Company. They are 
general hardware merchants and are also extensive dealers 
in lumber, their yards and warehouses being located on the 
Big Four Railroad. The company also deals in builders' 
supplies, plumbing fixtures, roofing, brick, and gravel. 

Mr. Mason was married in 1886 to Miss Emma A. Mak- 
emson, the daughter of Darius and Nancy (Watson) 
Makemson, natives of Oakwood, both now deceased. He 
died in 1884 and his wife died in 1915. They are buried in 
Pleasant Grove Cemetery. Four children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Mason: Laura, a graduate of Oakwood 
Township High School, married A. I. Duke, lives at Oak- 
wood, and they have three children, Clyde Duke, Martha 
Duke, and Glenn Duke ; Vivian E., a graduate of Oakwood 
Township High School, married Ross Hill, who died in 
1914, and they had three children, Dorothy, attends 
Charleston College, Esther, attends Oakwood Township 
High School, and Marion, who died in 1928; Gracia, at- 
tended Danville High School, married Walter Smoot, who 
died in 1914, and they had a daughter, LaVerne, who was 
graduated from Danville High School in 1929. Gracia 
Smoot later married Verne Jennings, of Danville; and 
Harold S., a graduate of Oakwood Township High School 
in 1928, attends the University of Illinois. 

Mr. Mason has always been a Democrat. He has served 
as highway commissioner and postmaster, as well as mayor 
of Oakwood. He is a charter member of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Free Will Lodge No. 872, and belongs 
to the Council and Commandery. He is president of the 
Oakwood Building & Loan Association and takes an active 
part in the business and civic life of the community. 



908 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Russell B. Rodgers. — Among the progressive and wide- 
ly known young business men of Vermilion County may be 
mentioned Russell B. Rodgers, who is proprietor of the 
Rodgers Grain Company at Oakwood. He was born near 
Veedersburg, Indiana, December 11, 1901, the son of Wil- 
liam and Marian (Durham) Rodgers. 

William Rodgers was born at Wallace, Indiana. 
Throughout his life he has been interested in general farm- 
ing and stock raising and is the owner of a fine farm of 
one hundred and seventy-eight acres near Veedersburg, 
Indiana. He is a Democrat and a member of the Christian 
Church. Mr. and Mrs. Rodgers are the parents of the 
following children: Minnie, the widow of Emerson 
Grenard, who was killed in an automobile accident, Jan- 
uary 22, 1929, and she lives at Wingate, Indiana ; Gertrude, 
married Alfred Humphrey, lives at Waynetown, Indiana; 
Lulu, married Raymond Mitchell, lives at Wingate, Indi- 
ana; Verna, married Charles Daisy, lives at Waynetown, 
Indiana ; Fred, lives at Frankfort, Indiana ; Frank, lives at 
Hoopeston, Illinois; Harry, lives at Newton, Indiana; Rus- 
sell B., the subject of this sketch; and Bernice, married 
Earl Alward, lives at Wallace, Indiana. 

Russell B. Rodgers obtained his education in the public 
schools of Veedersburg, Indiana, and remained on his 
father's farm until 1923, at which time he became identi- 
fied with the grain business of Freeman Knowles. Three 
years later he came to Oakwood, where he purchased the 
grain elevator from J. W. Johnston. His business has ex- 
panded greatly in the last few years and Mr. Rodgers now 
owns and operates elevators at Muncie, Brothers, and 
Bronson, Illinois. These four elevators handle the large 
volume of business which is operated under the name of 
the Rodgers Grain Company. While one of the youngest 
business men in the community, Mr. Rodgers ranks among 
the most independent and influential citizens of Oakwood. 
He lives at Oakwood. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 909 

On June 28, 1923, Mr. Rodgers married Miss Dora 
Rhodes, of Covington, Indiana, the daughter of Sylvester 
and Delia May (Jones) Rhodes. He was born in Ohio and 
died in 1909. His wife, a native of Indiana, died in 1918. 
Both are buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Covington, In- 
diana. To Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes five children were born: 
Alma, married Merle Haynes, lives at Dayton, Ohio ; Dora, 
Rodgers; Clarence, lives at Wingate, Indiana; Henry, lives 
at Detroit, Michigan; and Estelle, who lives at Oakwood. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rodgers have no children. 

Politically, Mr. Rodgers is a Democrat. He is a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church and his wife is identified with 
the United Brethren Church. He is affiliated with the 
Modern Woodmen of America. 



J. W. Johnston. — One of the most progressive business 
men of Oakwood is found in J. W. Johnston, who is presi- 
dent of the State Bank of Oakwood, and a member of one 
of the most prominent pioneer families of Vermilion Coun- 
ty. He was born on a farm just north of Oakwood, Jan- 
uary 23, 1856, the son of David and Mary A. E. (Britting- 
ham) Johnston. 

David Johnston was born in Kentucky. When a boy 
his parents removed to Ohio, where he was educated. In 
1844 he came to Illinois and broke prairie with ox teams 
in the western part of Oakwood Township, Vermilion 
County. From 1857 until the time of his death in 1905 he 
was a farmer in Oakwood Township. He was one of the 
pioneers and became a prominent farmer of this com- 
munity. He is buried in Pleasant Grove Cemetery. His 
wife died April 11, 1910. Mr. Johnston was a Republican 
and served as a member of the school board for many 
years. He held membership in the Methodist Church, To 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnston two children were born: Matilda 



910 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Jane, died August 6, 1880, was the wife of David M. Young, 
who died in 1925; and J. W., the subject of this sketch. 

J. W. Johnston obtained his education in the district 
schools of Vermilion County and spent his boyhood on 
his father's farm. He became a partner in his father's 
farm and its management in 1878 and developed into one 
of the leading stockmen of this section of the county. This 
partnership between father and son. continued for sixteen 
years, after which the elder Mr. Johnston retired. J. W. 
Johnston continued as active manager of the farm until 
1917, at which time he leased the land for several years. 
It is now operated by his own children. Mr. Johnston is 
the owner of five hundred and twenty acres of well im- 
proved land, but has been a resident of Oakwood since 
1926, at that time having built a new home there. He has 
served as president of the State Bank of Oakwood since 
1924. 

On December 19, 1900, Mr. Johnston was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Estelle Oakwood, the daughter of Henry 
J. and Priscilla (Sailor) Oakwood, both deceased. They 
have three children: Mary Oletha, born December 11, 
1901, a graduate of Oakwood Township High School, mar- 
ried Albert Seyf ert, lives near Oakwood ; Martha Frances, 
born July 15, 1904, a graduate of Oakwood Township High 
School, married Orville Albert, lives near Oakwood; and 
Henry David, born April 19, 1908, a graduate of Oakwood 
Township High School in 1926, lives at home. 

Mr. Johnston has always been a Republican. He has 
held the office of supervisor of Oakwood Township for 
two terms and since 1901 has been a member of the local 
school board and treasurer. He has been identified with 
the Masonic Lodge since 1878, being a member of Oak- 
wood Lodge No. 872, Danville Consistory, Vermilion Chap- 
ter No. 82, Athelstan Commandery No. 45, Knights Tem- 
plar. While Mr. Johnston is actively identified with the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 911 

business life of Oakwood, he derives his greatest pleasure 
and happiness from his farm, which is among the finest 
to be found in Vermilion County. 



Gordon Bridgman, popular garage owner of Oakwood, 
was born here, October 17, 1897, the son of W. H. and 
Elizabeth (Pate) Bridgman. 

W. H. Bridgeman, a farmer of Vermilion County, was 
born at Summerfield, Ohio. He came to Illinois early in 
life and for a number of years was employed by the Butler 
Coal Company, Oakwood. He later went to Arkansas and 
spent seven years on a farm there before his return to 
Oakwood, where he was employed in the coal mines. Mr. 
Bridgman is now interested in farming near Oakwood. 
He is a member of the Christian Church. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Bridgman the following children were born: Glenn, a 
World War veteran, lives at Oakwood; Gordon, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Ula V., married Virgil Rossnell, lives 
at Fairmount, Illinois; Anna, married Elmer Balback, 
lives at Oakwood; Josephine, lives at home; W. H., Jr., 
lives at home ; Hardy and Paul, both at home ; Robert, who 
died in 1919; and Ballard, at home. 

Gordon Bridgman spent the early years of his life on a 
farm in Arkansas. He attended the public schools and 
later enrolled in an automotive school at Kansas City, 
Missouri, where he learned the automobile mechanic's 
trade. He has been the proprietor of a garage at Oakwood 
since 1925. It is located on Route No. 10, just east of the 
city. Mr. Bridgman does expert repair work and handles 
a complete line of automobile accessories. He also is a 
battery specialist. 

On April 12, 1921, Mr. Bridgman was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Crystal Van Allen, of Oakwood, the 
daughter of 0. M. and Rebecca (Hill) Van Allen, the for- 



912 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

mer a native of Ohio and the latter of Vermilion County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Van Allen are residents of Oakwood. There 
are two children in the Bridgman family: Thelma May, 
born December 5, 1921; and Wilma Regene, born April 5, 
1924. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bridgman are members of the United 
Brethren Church. 



O. P. Clark. — Among the important business men of 
Vermilion County, and of Georgetown in particular, few 
represent more substantial interests than 0. P. Clark, who 
is president of the First National Bank. He was born near 
Crawfordsville, Indiana, February 17, 1867, the son of 
John G. and Mary (Holladay) Clark. 

John G. Clark was for many years one of the leading 
business men of Georgetown. He was born at Guilford, 
North Carolina, and spent his early life there. He later 
lived in Indiana, and in 1872 came to Illinois and pur- 
chased a farm near Ridge Farm, where he remained until 
1886. He was a dentist by profession and engaged in prac- 
tice at Covington and Crawfordsville, Indiana. Mr. Clark 
came to Vermilion County about 1870 and purchased a 
farm in Elwood Township. He became president of the 
First National Bank of Georgetown with which he was 
identified until the time of his death in 1917. He is buried 
at Georgetown. Mr. Clark was a prominent member of 
the Friends Church of Vermilion Grove and was one of the 
founders of Friends Academy at that place. Mary (Hol- 
laday) Clark, a native of Vermilion County, died in 1919. 
Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Clark: 0. P., the 
subject of this sketch; S. M., judge, lives at Danville; and 
Emma, married Elbert C. Cosand, who is head of the Eng- 
lish department at Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana. 

0. P. Clark spent his boyhood on a farm near Ridge 
Farm. He attended Vermilion Academy and in 1889 was 



O. P. CLAIMC 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 913 

graduated from Earlham College with the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science. He then taught school for three years and 
in 1892 became interested in the banking business as 
cashier of Dwiggins & Starbuck, at Georgetown. The fol- 
lowing year this institution was taken over by John G. 
Clark, father of the subject of this sketch, and P. H. Smith. 
It was operated as a private bank until 1900, at which 
time it became a national bank, with John G. Clark as 
president, and 0. P. Clark as cashier. After the death of 
his father in 1917, Mr. Clark succeeded to the presidency. 
He has been associated with the Georgetown Building & 
Loan Association since 1896, having served as secretary- 
treasurer, and is now president. 

In August, 1892, Mr. Clark was united in marriage 
with Ada Elliott, of Vermilion Grove, the daughter of 
John M. and Sarah (Mendenhall) Elliott, natives of North 
Carolina and Illinois, respectively. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Elliott are deceased and are buried at Vermilion Grove. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clark are the parents of seven children, as 
follows: 1. Ruth, born in 1893, a graduate of George- 
town High School, Earlham College, and the University of 
Illinois, having received her Master's degree at the latter 
institution. She was married June 1, 1928, to Ward N. 
Black, who is superintendent of schools at Georgetown. 
2. Elma, born in 1895, a graduate of Georgetown High 
School, Earlham College, and Columbia University, having 
received her Master's degree at the latter institution. She 
is now dean of the girls Westtown School at Westtown, 
Pennsylvania. 3. Zola, born in 1897, a graduate of 
Georgetown High School and Earlham College. She mar- 
ried Clyde Little, attorney, and lives at Cleveland, Ohio. 

4. John E., born July 4, 1900, a graduate of Georgetown 
High School and the Law School of the University of Illi- 
nois. He is a member of the firm of Hutton & Clark, Dan- 
ville. He married Gladys Castle, of Ridge Farm, Illinois. 

5. Mary, born in 1903, a graduate of Georgetown High 

24^-Vol. 2 



914 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

School and Earlham College. She is a teacher in the Scotts- 
dale (Pennsylvania) High School. 6. Oren P., assistant 
cashier of the First National Bank, Georgetown, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this history. 7. Iola, born 
in 1908, a graduate of Georgetown High School, Earlham 
College, and the University of Illinois, having received her 
degree from the latter institution in 1929. She is a teacher 
of physical culture in the high school at Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Mr. Clark has always been a Republican. He has held 
the office of mayor of Georgetown, and has been a member 
of the local school board for the past twenty-eight years. 
He has also been a member of the board of trustees of Earl- 
ham College for eighteen years and a member of the board 
of trustees of Vermilion Academy for fifteen years. He is 
a member of the Masonic Lodge, Knights of Pythias and 
Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Clark is the owner of a fine dairy farm of two hun- 
dred and twenty acres south of Georgetown, on which he 
now has fifty head of pure bred cattle. 

Mr. Clark has always taken a keen interest in the 
affairs of Vermilion County. 



Oren P. Clark is one of the prominent young bankers 
of Vermilion County, being identified with the First Na- 
tional Bank of Georgetown as assistant cashier. He was 
born in this city, November 7, 1906, the son of 0. P. and 
Ada (Elliott) Clark. 

A complete sketch of 0. P. Clark appears elsewhere in 
this history. 

Oren P. Clark acquired a city school education and after 
his graduation from Georgetown High School entered the 
University of Illinois from which he received his degree in 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 915 

1928. He has since been connected with the First National 
Bank of Georgetown as assistant cashier. 

Mr. Clark is a Republican and is a member of Phi Pi 
Phi fraternity. 



J. D. Cromwell. — A leading business man of Vermilion 
County is found in J. D. Cromwell, who is interested in 
the general mercantile business at Fithian. He was born 
here, December 28, 1858, the son of Jackson and Mary Jane 
(Meade) Cromwell. 

Jackson Cromwell was born at Marion, Indiana, and 
his wife was a native of Conkeytown, Illinois. He fol- 
lowed farming throughout his life. He died March 31, 
1920, and his wife died March 27, 1923. Both are buried 
in McFarland Cemetery. Their children were: Jackson 
and Maria, both deceased; J. D., the subject of this sketch; 
J. S., lives at Fairmount; Cora Reams, lives at Fairmount; 
Rosetta and Nellie, both deceased. 

J. D. Cromwell attended the schools of Fithian. He 
has always lived here and for a number of years was inter- 
ested in general farming and stock raising. He is now 
recognized as one of the dependable merchants of Fithian, 
where he has a well established business. 

On October 3, 1878, Mr. Cromwell married Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Long, of Perrysville, Indiana, the daughter of 
William J. and Nancy E. (Gritton) Long, the former a 
native of Ohio and the latter of Kentucky. Mr. Long died 
February 17, 1915, and his wife died October 20, 1892. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Cromwell the following children were born: 
Charles Elmer, died January 20, 1882; Hallie Jackson, died 
December 21, 1884; John Winfield, died November 26, 1920; 
Arthur Earl, garage owner, lives at Fairmount, Illinois; 
Everett Ortha, died May 30, 1890; Lena E. Richard, lives 
at Fithian; Leona W. Hopper, lives at Fairmount; and 
Wilma E. Anderson, lives in Chicago. 



916 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mr. Cromwell is a Republican, a member of the Meth- 
odist Church, and is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America, and Royal 
Neighbors. 

At the time the court house in Danville was being built 
in 1877, Mr. Cromwell hauled one-eighth of the brick used 
in the construction of the building. 

In 1876 he hauled one-fourth of the brick used in build- 
ing the Centennial Hotel at Danville. He also worked six 
months during that time in a general store for Mr. 
Webster. 



Frank G. Doney, capable postmaster of Fithian, is a 
member of one of the oldest and best known families of 
Vermilion County. He was born at Fithian, November 2, 
1880, the son of Barton T. and Belle (Owens) Doney. 

A complete sketch of Barton T. Doney appears else- 
where in this history. 

Frank G. Doney attended the public schools of Fithian, 
and throughout his early business career was identified 
with his father's store at Fithian, being in the latter's 
employ for twenty-seven years. He became a partner in 
the business, which was disposed of in March, 1925. Mr. 
Doney was then employed for a year in the shops of the 
Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad at Danville. He 
assumed the office of postmaster at Fithian, May 5, 1926. 

On July 29, 1903, Mr. Doney was united in marriage 
with Miss Anna J. Fisher, of Fithian, the daughter of 
Joseph and Martha (Board) Fisher. Mr. Fisher was born 
at Richmond, Indiana, and died May 1, 1916. His widow 
has spent her entire life at Fithian. Their children were : 
Sina, married Everett Underwood, lives at Georgetown, 
Illinois; Maude, died in April, 1923, was the wife of Joseph 
Williams; Anna J. Doney; R. L., who died April 24, 1929; 
John, lives at Fithian; Fremont, who died June 6, 1910; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 917 

Hazel, married Clarence Payne, lives at Fithian ; Fay, lives 
at Danville; and Doris Lucille, lives at Fithian. Mr. and 
Mrs. Doney have no children. 

Politically Mr. Doney is a Republican. He and his wife 
hold membership in the Methodist Church, and he belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Modern Wood- 
men of America, and Royal Neighbors. 



Barton Taylor Doney, deceased, was identified with the 
business life of Fithian for a number of years, and was 
among its most honored citizens. He was born at Spencer, 
Indiana, in 1849, and died at Fithian, January 17, 1928. 

Mr. Doney was reared and educated in Indiana. He 
came to Illinois about 1873 and settled at Newton, where 
he conducted a blacksmith shop for two years. He then 
removed to Fithian, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. He became one of the most successful merchants of 
this section and owned and operated a general mercantile 
business here for almost half a century. He also served 
as postmaster at Fithian for a period of eighteen years. 
Mr. Doney retired in March, 1925, and died three years 
later. He is buried in Stearns Cemetery, near Fithian. 

Mr. Doney married Miss Belle Owens, of Owensburg, 
Indiana. She lives at Fithian. Four sons were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Doney: John, lives at Danville; Frank G., 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this history ; Clyde 
B., lives at Villa Grove, Illinois; and Benjamin, who died 
February 6, 1908. 

Mr. Doney was a life long Republican. He served as 
assessor of Oakwood Township continuously for twelve 
years, and was also a member of the local school board. 
He was a member of the Christian Church and Modern 
Woodmen of America, being a charter member of the local 
lodge. 



918 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

John Urbas. — One of the leading citizens and most 
prominent business men of Westville is John Urbas, who 
has been the proprietor of a funeral home there for almost 
a quarter of a century. He was born in Lithuania, June 
6, 1882, the son of Michael and Antanna (Darzinika) 
Urbas. 

Michael Urbas and his wife were born in Lithuania, 
where they spent their early lives. He followed farming 
until he came to the United States, and then was employed 
as a cabinet maker in Chicago. He came to Westville in 
1904 and the following year went to Spring Valley, where 
he remained for two years. He then returned to West- 
ville, where he now lives retired. He is eighty-eight years 
of age. His wife died in 1908 and is buried at Spring Val- 
ley. To Mr. and Mrs. Urbas the following children were 
born : Elizabeth, deceased ; Joseph, lives in Chicago ; John, 
the subject of this sketch; and Eva, married Peter Gelt- 
kovisky, lives at Westville. 

John Urbas was reared and educated in his native land 
and was fifteen years old when he came to this country 
with his parents. He was employed in a grocery store in 
Chicago for several years and during that time attended 
night school. He also attended Barnes School of Anatomy 
and Embalming, from which he was graduated in 1905. 
In February, 1906, he established a business at Spring Val- 
ley, where he was associated in partnership with Antonio 
Carp. After two years Mr. Urbas sold his interest in the 
business and came to Westville in 1907, where he conducted 
a funeral home on State Street until 1909. He then re- 
moved to his present location on West Street. A new 
mortuary is in the process of construction on this site and 
promises to be the finest type of funeral home in Ver- 
milion County. A chapel will be erected in connection with 
the mortuary and the latest type of funeral equipment will 
be installed by Mr. Urbas. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 919 

In 1914 Mr. Urbas was united in marriage with Miss 
Margaret Lugousky, of Westville, the daughter of Charles 
and Anna Lugousky, natives of Lithuania. The former 
died in 1926. Mrs. Lugousky lives at Westville. Mr. and 
Mrs. Urbas are the parents of two sons: John, born in 

1915, attends Westville High School; and Cyril, born in 

1916, student. 

Mr. Urbas is identified with the Republican party in 
politics and served as postmaster of Westville, as well as 
alderman. He is a member of Saint Peter's and Saint 
Paul's Catholic Church, and is affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias, Redmen's Lodge, and Citizens Club. 

As a pastime, Mr. Urbas finds much pleasure in hunt- 
ing and is the owner of several fine hunting dogs. 



J. Frank Haworth. — Prominent in business and finan- 
cial circles in Westville, J. Frank Haworth has played an 
important part in the growth of his city, where he is presi- 
dent of the First National Bank. He was born at Bloom- 
ingdale, Indiana, March 12, 1880, the son of Beriah and 
Sarah (Trimble) Haworth. 

Beriah Haworth was born in Georgetown Township, 
Vermilion County, and his wife was a native of Ridge 
Farm, Illinois. He grew up in that section of the county 
and received his education in the district schools. He 
engaged in farming until 1880, at which time he and his 
brothers purchased a pottery. He met with an accidental 
death in 1884, at the age of forty-four years. His widow 
later remarried and lived in Kansas until the time of her 
death in January, 1929. To Beriah and Sarah (Trimble) 
Haworth were born the following children: Charles E., 
lives at Argonia, Kansas; William W., lives at Argonia, 
Kansas; Nellie, married Robert Weller, lives at Wichita, 
Kansas; J. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Donna, mar- 



920 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ried R. S. Hammond, lives at Argonia, Kansas; and Bessie 
E., married L. W. Englehardt, lives at Fort Myers, Florida. 

J. Frank Haworth was four years old when his father 
died. He then went West with his mother and lived at 
Argonia, Kansas, until 1898, at which time Mr. Haworth 
returned to Illinois and settled at Vermilion Grove. He 
entered Vermilion Grove Academy in 1898 and four years 
later accepted a position as bookkeeper in the First Na- 
tional Bank, of Georgetown. At that time 0. P. Clark 
was president of the institution and three years later Mr. 
Clark purchased a controlling interest in the First Na- 
tional Bank of Westville. At that time Mr. Haworth was 
transferred to Westville as vice president of the local bank. 
In 1915 he purchased Mr. Clark's interest in the bank, in 
partnership with A. L. Summers, and the latter became 
president with Mr. Haworth as vice president and cashier. 
In March, 1923, Mr. Summers died and at that time Mr. 
Haworth became president of the bank. 

The First National Bank of Westville was organized 
in December, 1904. It has a capital stock of $25,000, sur- 
plus of $25,000, and deposits amounting to $700,000. It 
is recognized as one of the leading financial institutions 
of the county and succeeds in rendering first class banking 
service to its large clientele. 

In 1913 Mr. Haworth was united in marriage with Miss 
Laura B. Smith, of Hoopeston, the daughter of Samuel D. 
and Anna (Wolf) Smith, the former a native of Penn- 
sylvania and the latter of Ohio. Mr. Smith died in 1919 
and his wife died in 1920. Both are buried at Hoopeston, 
Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Haworth are the parents of five 
children: John Franklin, born in 1915, attends George- 
town High School; William B., born in 1916, attends 
Georgetown High School; Catherine Anne, born in 1918; 
Ruth Eleanor, born in 1920, died in 1928; and Charles 
Richard, born December 31, 1923. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 921 

Mr. Haworth has always been a Republican. He is a 
member of the Friends Church, and is affiliated with the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Georgetown Lodge 
No. 154, Danville Consistory, Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, and Redmen Lodge. The Haworth home is at George- 
town, where Mr. Haworth has served as a member of the 
school board and as treasurer of the board for the past 
twenty years. He also owns a farm of eighty acres in 
Grant Township, where he enjoys spending his leisure 
time. 



J. F. Quartier. — One of the outstanding business men 
of Westville is J. F. Quartier, proprietor of the Quartier 
Company. He was born in Belgium, June 8, 1884, the son 
of Eugene and Virginia (Blary) Quartier. 

Eugene Quartier was a native of Belgium and his wife 
was born in France. They came to the United States in 
about 1884 and settled in Danville, where Mr. Quartier 
was employed in the mines. In 1894 he became interested 
in the grocery business in South Danville, and in 1900 
established a branch store at Westville. The Danville store 
was destroyed by fire in 1912 but Mr. Quartier continued 
as proprietor of the Westville store until 1920, when he 
sold the business to his son and retired. He died Decem- 
ber 30, 1926, and his wife died in 1925. Both are buried 
in Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville. Mr. Quartier was a 
Republican. The following children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Quartier: Victoria, died in infancy; Eugene, died 
in 1913, had served as mayor of Westville and as tax col- 
lector of Georgetown Township; Marie, died in 1916, was 
the wife of John Montgerard; John, died in 1918; Celia, 
died at the age of ten years; and J. F., the subject of this 
sketch. 

J. F. Quartier was educated in the schools of Danville, 
afterwards going into the store with his father. He also 



922 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

became interested in the insurance business, which he has 
continued to the present time in connection with his other 
enterprises. When he became proprietor of the Quartier 
Company in 1920 he established a furniture business in 
connection with the former, which has been numbered for 
many years among the leading grocery stores of Ver- 
milion County. A branch furniture store was established 
at Georgetown in 1924. The local stores have an exten- 
sive trade within a radius of thirty miles of Westville. 

In 1907 Mr. Quartier married Miss Mildred Copeland, 
of Danville, the daughter of W. G. and DeBora (Hoover) 
Copeland. Mr. and Mrs. Copeland were natives of Ver- 
milion County. There are three children in the Quartier 
family: Julien, associated in business with his father; 
Mildred, and Ernest John, students. 

The family residence is located at 24 North Main Street, 
Danville. 



Arthur L. Stewart is a successful business man of Dan- 
ville, where he is identified with the Stewart Rug Service, 
1203 Oak Street. He was born at Liberty, Indiana, March 
7, 1882, the son of Benjamin and Virginia (Bunting) 
Stewart. 

Benjamin Stewart was born at College Corner, Ohio. 
He was employed in his father's sawmill until he was 
twenty-five years of age and then removed to Oxford, 
Ohio, where he owned and operated a farm for several 
years. He later lived at Liberty and Everton, Indiana, 
and also was a resident of Anderson, Indiana. About 1910 
he located at Peru, Indiana, where he resided until the 
time of his death in 1918. He is buried at Anderson, 
Indiana. His widow, born at Liberty, Indiana, lives at 
Danville and is eighty-four years of age. Eight children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Stewart, as follows : Dallas E., 
farmer, lives near Indianapolis, Indiana; Minnie Myrtle, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 923 

died in infancy; Cortland Clifford, lives at Alton, Illinois; 
Leah I., married John Moore, lives at Anderson, Indiana; 
Laura Oma, married Earl Spargur, lives at Indianapolis, 
Indiana; Martin, died in infancy; Arthur L., the subject 
of this sketch; and Margaret Louise Baker, married 
George Reynolds, lives at Huntington, West Virginia. 

Arthur L. Stewart attended the public schools of An- 
derson, Indiana. As a boy he was employed in a glass 
factory and was identified with the glass industry as a 
blower until 1911. He was employed at Simms, Indiana, 
and later was located at Chicago Heights, Illinois, Marion, 
Indiana, Muncie, Indiana, and Danville. He came to Dan- 
ville in 1906. In November, 1911, he purchased a portable 
vacuum cleaning rug machine and this was the beginning 
of his well established business of today. He organized 
a sweeping club and made contracts for the cleaning of 
homes, offices, stores, etc. In 1917 another department 
was added to the business, that of cleaning and repairing 
Oriental rugs. The business has increased to such an 
extent that the service building on Oak Street has been 
enlarged on numerous occasions. The Stewart Rug Serv- 
ice renders high grade service not only to his local cus- 
tomers but also many cleaning plants throughout the Uni- 
ted States, making a specialty of servicing Oriental rugs. 
It maintains service throughout the United States and has 
an unusually large volume of business. Mr. Stewart has 
made numerous inventions which pertain to the cleaning 
process and these are also shipped to various points 
throughout the United States and Canada. 

In 1901 Mr. Stewart was united in marriage with Miss 
Carrie John of Swayzee, Indiana, the daughter of H. C. 
and Sarah (Collins) John, natives of Indiana. Mr. John 
died in 1925 and his wife died in 1929. Carrie (John) 
Stewart died February 25, 1904, and is buried at Swayzee, 
Indiana. She was the mother of two children: Ethel 
Vera, born June 3, 1902, a graduate of Danville High 



924 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

School and for seven years a teacher at Garfield 
School, married on June 8, 1929, to Otha Mitchell, of 
Swayzee, Indiana. They live at Danville. (2) Lowell 
Reece, born September 4, 1903, a graduate of Garfield 
School. He is now an engineer on the New York Central 
Railroad. He was married March 24, 1922, to Ruby Rife, 
of Danville, and they have two children, Marion and Gene 
Stewart. Mr. Stewart was married the second time in 
1907 to Ella Menier, of Danville. She was reared and edu- 
cated by Rev. S. S. Jones, of Danville. 

Mr. Stewart is a Democrat. He and his wife hold mem- 
bership in the Christian Church, and he belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America. 



P. L. Testa, popular garage owner of Georgetown, is 
among the reliable and substantial business men of Ver- 
milion County. He was born at Braidwood, Illinois, May 
29, 1885, the son of John and Mary (Testa) Testa. 

John Testa, a native of Italy, is a well known resident 
of Cardiff, Illinois. He was about twenty years of age 
when he came to the United States and settled at Braid- 
wood, Illinois, where he engaged in the general mercantile 
business. He has lived retired since 1919. His wife is 
also a native of Italy. To Mr. and Mrs. Testa the fol- 
lowing children were born: Angela, married William 
McLean, and she died in 1919; Mary, married Caesar 
Antonina, lives at Wilmett, Illinois; Minnie, twin sister 
of Mary, married Thomas Tyrell, lives at Cardiff, Illinois; 
P. L., the subject of this sketch; Anton, lives at Hillsboro, 
Illinois; Lucy, married William Monahan, lives at Hills- 
boro, Illinois; and Phillip, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this history. 

P. L. Testa attended the public schools of Braidwood, 
Illinois, and Carbon Hill. He was employed in his father's 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 925 

store for several years and in 1894 engaged in the mer- 
cantile business for himself at Cardiff, Illinois. After a 
year he sold the store and removed to a farm near Cardiff, 
where he spent two years. He then went to Bensenville, 
Illinois, where he owned and operated a general store for 
seven years. Mr. Testa later worked in the coal mines, and 
in December, 1927, came to Georgetown, where in partner- 
ship with his brother, Phillip Testa, he purchased the 
garage business of J. R. Dillon. Later, they became local 
agents for the Ford automobile, trucks and tractors. They 
are recognized as leading automobile men of this section 
of Vermilion County and operate one of the most up-to- 
date garages and service stations. 

In 1909 Mr. Testa was united in marriage with Miss 
Laura Tyrell, of Cardiff, Illinois, the daughter of Thomas 
and Elizabeth (Sinnett) Tyrell, natives of Ireland. Mr. 
Tyrell died at Campus, Illinois, in 1900 and his wife died 
there, March 6, 1927. To Mr. and Mrs. Testa the following 
children have been born: Alvin, born in January, 1912, 
attends Georgetown High School; John, born in May, 1913, 
attends Georgetown High School; Loretta, born in 1917, 
student; Harvey, born in July, 1919, student; and Phillip, 
born in April, 1928. 

Mr. Testa is a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church. 



Phillip Testa, who is identified with Testa Brothers 
Motor Company, Georgetown, is a veteran of the World 
War and is recognized as one of the enterprising and suc- 
cessful young men of Vermilion County. He was born at 
Carbon Hill, Illinois, May 8, 1893, the son of John and 
Mary (Testa) Testa. 

A complete sketch of John Testa appears in the biog- 
raphy of P. L. Testa, to be found elsewhere in this history. 



926 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Phillip Testa received his education in the public 
schools of Carbon Hill and Cardiff, Illinois. He studied 
automobile mechanics at Grier College, Chicago, and began 
his career as a mechanic in the employ of the Simmons 
Motor Company, Chicago. After eighteen months in that 
company's employ Mr. Testa returned to Cardiff and was 
connected with a garage there until 1917, at which time 
he enlisted for service in the World War. He was sent 
to Fort Wright, Long Island, New York, and attached to 
the Coast Artillery. He sailed for overseas duty in Octo- 
ber, 1917, and saw active service in France throughout the 
war period. After his discharge in March, 1919, Mr. Testa 
located at Georgetown, where he was employed in the 
garage of J. R. Dillon. He and his brother, P. L. Testa, 
have been the owners of this popular garage since Decem- 
ber, 1927, and are local Ford dealers. 

Mr. Testa is a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church, 
Georgetown, and belongs to the American Legion. He is 
unmarried. 



G. E. Blayney, proprietor of Georgetown's leading drug 
store, is a representative and widely known citizen of Ver- 
milion County. He was born at Grant, Nebraska, Sep- 
tember 24, 1889, the son of C. F. and Clara (Hepker) 
Blayney. 

C. F. Blayney is a native of Pennsylvania. He spent 
his early life there and later lived in Nebraska. He sub- 
sequently engaged in the grain business at Montpelier, 
Ohio, and also owned elevators at Eden, Ohio. He later 
lived at Angola, Indiana, and for several years was the 
owner of a hotel at Fremont, Indiana. Mr. Blayney owned 
and operated a fruit farm near Paw Paw, Michigan, and 
for a number of years was the proprietor of a drug store 
at Elkhart, Indiana. Since 1915 he has lived at Fairfield, 
Illinois, where he is the owner of several large farms. He 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 927 

and his wife are members of the Methodist Church. She 
was born at Bryan, Ohio. To Mr. and Mrs. Blayney were 
born two children: G. E., the subject of this sketch; and 
Clela, married Dale Black, lives at Fairfield, Illinois. 

G. E. Blayney obtained his education in the public 
schools of Angola, Indiana, where he also attended Tri- 
State College. He spent three years as a clerk in Why- 
song's Drug Store, Angola, after which he entered Val- 
paraiso University, being graduated as a pharmacist in 
1911. He spent the following six months as a pharmacist 
in the O'Malley Drug Company, at Dwight, Illinois, and 
then purchased a drug store at Elkhart, Indiana, which 
he successfully conducted for three years. He later owned 
a store at Fairfield, Illinois, and for a time was connected 
with Vanetta's Drug Store, Chicago Heights. He came 
to Danville in 1916 and purchased the Philpott Drug Com- 
pany, which he successfully managed until November, 
1919, at which time he came to Georgetown and purchased 
the F. E. Kesper Drug Company, which was operated 
under the name of Blayney & McGee until June, 1920, 
when Mr. Blayney became sole proprietor. The store was 
completely remodeled in 1925 and is among the attractive 
stores of the city. 

On August 5, 1913, Mr. Blayney was united in marriage 
with Miss Glycie Krouse, of Elkhart, Indiana, the daugh- 
ter of P. G. and Rebecca (Benfer) Krouse, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, now residents of South Bend, Indiana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Blayney have a daughter, Mary Jane, born August 
21, 1916. 

Mr. Blayney is a Republican and is serving his third 
term as assistant supervisor. He is a member of the Meth- 
odist Church, and is affiliated with the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Russell Lodge No. 154, Danville Con- 
sistory, Ansar Shrine, Springfield, Illinois, and Gao Grotto, 
Danville. He is secretary of the Home Building Loan 
Association of Georgetown. 



928 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

M. S. Fletcher, M. D. — During the twenty-five years 
that he has been established in a general practice at 
Georgetown, Doctor M. S. Fletcher, a veteran of the World 
War, has proven his skill as a physician and his worth as a 
citizen, and today stands out as one of the county's fore- 
most men. He was born at Ridge Farm, February 17, 
1869, the son of Henry and Mahala (Haworth) Fletcher. 

Henry Fletcher, a native of Vermilion Grove, spent his 
entire life in Vermilion County and was numbered among 
its most successful farmers. He died in 1909 and is buried 
at Pilot Grove. His wife, born at Georgetown, spent her 
entire life in Vermilion County and died in 1926. Mr. 
Fletcher was a Republican, a member of Friends Church 
at Pilot Grove, and a charter member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. He served as supervisor of Elwood 
Township for several terms. To Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher 
were born eight children: Oliver, born in 1861, died in 
1865; John, born in 1864, lives at Ridge Farm; Albert, 
born in 1867, died in 1899 ; M. S., the subject of this sketch ; 
Cassius, born in 1872, died in 1876 ; William, born in 1876, 
postmaster at Joliet, 111.; Lydia, married John Wasson, 
lives at Chrisman, Illinois, and Ola, married Joseph Pierce, 
lives at Ridge Farm. 

M. S. Fletcher attended the district school, Ridgefarm 
High School, and in 1889 he taught school in the Busby 
district at thirty dollars a month. In 1900 he entered the 
University of Illinois. By hard work he was able to sup- 
port himself throughout his college career and in 1894 he 
entered the Medical School of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, where he spent two years. He received his degree 
as Doctor of Medicine from the University of Illinois, at 
Chicago, in 1898, and in 1899 received his Bachelor of 
Science degree from this University at Champaign, Illinois. 

In the spring of 1898 he began the practice of medi- 
cine at Jamaica, Illinois, where he remained almost a year. 
He then was located at Ridge Farm for a period of three 



ij.^£cui^^/.,yyi.%, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 929 

years, after which he served as county physician at Dan- 
ville for three years. He came to Georgetown in 1905, 
where he has since remained, and where he has established 
an excellent practice. 

Doctor Fletcher enlisted for service during the World 
War, July 26, 1917, and received the commission of first 
lieutenant. He was stationed at Fort Benjamin Harrison, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, and later was transferred to Camp 
Buell, Kentucky, being discharged from the service on 
January 6, 1919. 

In 1897 Doctor Fletcher was united in marriage with 
Miss Jessie Baum, of Ridge Farm, the daughter of Joseph 
and Sarah (Beal) Baum. Mr. Baum is deceased and his 
widow lives at Ridgefarm. Mrs. Fletcher was educated in 
the Ridgefarm High School, and for ten years taught in 
the same high school. Doctor and Mrs. Fletcher have a 
daughter, Mildred, born in 1900. She is a graduate of 
Georgetown High School and Penn College in Iowa, and 
also has a degree from the University of Illinois. She is 
the wife of Kenneth Schecter, of Georgetown. They have 
a daughter, Sally Sue, born August 31, 1928. 

Doctor Fletcher is a Republican, a member of the 
Friends Church, Georgetown, and belongs to the American 
Legion. He served as president of the Georgetown School 
Board for fourteen years and has always taken an active 
part in the social and civic life of the community. 

The maternal great-grandfather of Doctor Fletcher, 
James Haworth, was the founder of the city of George- 
town, having filed a plat of the town, March 30, 1827. The 
paternal great-grandfather, Henry Fletcher, was teaching 
school at Vermilion Grove at that time and it is claimed 
that he was the third school teacher in Vermilion County. 
This data gives the date of residence in Vermilion County 
of these ancestors of Doctor Fletcher as one hundred and 
two years ago. 

25— Vol. 2 



930 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Charles Brooks, who is the efficient and well known 
cashier of the First National Bank of Westville, is a native 
of this place. He was born December 11, 1885. 

Mr. Brooks was educated in the public schools of West- 
ville and began his business career in Chicago. Upon his 
return to this city in November, 1918, he became assistant 
cashier of the First National Bank. In June, 1921, he 
resigned to become assistant national bank examiner. 
However, in May, 1923, Mr. Brooks returned to the First 
National Bank of Westville as cashier, in which capacity 
he now serves. 

Mr. Brooks married Miss Nell Murphy, of Westville. 
They have no children. 

Politically, Mr. Brooks is a Republican. He and his 
wife are active in the social life of Westville, and have a 
wide circle of friends. 



Ernest Paxton. — Numbered among the prominent citi- 
zens and successful business men of Georgetown is Ernest 
Paxton, who is vice president and secretary of the "Grab 
It Here Stores." He was born at Owensville, Kentucky, 
March 31, 1901, the son of C. S. and L. V. (Warner) Pax- 
ton, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. 

Ernest Paxton was reared and educated at George- 
town and after his graduation from high school in 1920 
he became interested in the management of the "Grab It 
Here Store," the original store being located at George- 
town. Stores were subsequently opened throughout Illi- 
nois and Indiana until the company now owns and operates 
thirty branch stores. The business was incorporated in 
1924 with C. S. Paxton as president, and Ernest Paxton 
as vice president and secretary. Mrs. James Rice is also 
a member of the firm. The Illinois stores are located in 
the following cities: Georgetown, Westville, Sidell, Fair- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 931 

mount, Newman, Danville, Indianola, Hume, Potomac, 
Broadlands, Hoopeston, Kansas, Paris, Tuscola. There 
are two stores at Georgetown and five located in the city 
of Danville. The Indiana stores are located as follows: 
Dana, Cayuga, Kingman, Covington, Veedersburg, Attica, 
Hillsboro, and Williamsport. The company operates its 
own bakeries at Danville, where the headquarters of the 
business are located. Approximately one hundred people 
are employed. The well known slogan of the company, 
"Where Ma Saves Pa's Dough," accurately describes the 
shopping powers afforded the customers of this large 
establishment. 

In 1921 Mr. Paxton was united in marriage with Miss 
Grace Shipps, of Bakersfield, California, the daughter of 
John and Cora (Frazier) Shipps, natives of Catlin, Illinois, 
and now residents of Bakersfield, California. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Paxton have been born two sons: Joseph Sherman, 
born in 1923 ; and Norman Frazier, born in 1925. 

Mr. Paxton is a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, Masonic Lodge, and Knights of Pythias, and is a 
director in the Georgetown Building and Loan Association. 



W. C. Dukes. — A substantial citizen and enterprising 
and dependable business man of Georgetown is found in 
W. C. Dukes, building contractor. He was born at West- 
ville, Illinois, February 8, 1864, the son of Ellis and Nancy 
(Bowen) Dukes. 

Ellis Dukes was born near Westville, Illinois, where he 
engaged in general farming until 1875. He then went to 
Montgomery County, Kansas, where he spent the remain- 
der of his life. He died in 1879 and his wife, a native of 
Vermilion County, died in 1877. Both are buried in 
Kansas. They were the parents of the following children: 
R. N., lives in Ohio; J. H., who served as road commis- 



932 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

sioner of Georgetown Township for twenty-five years, died 
at Westville in 1928; Mary, who died in 1878, was the wife 
of Henry Robertson; George W., who died in 1877; W. C, 
the subject of this sketch; and Rachel F., married U. C. 
Graham, lives at Pierceton, Indiana. 

W. C. Dukes spent his early youth on a farm near 
Westville and later lived in Montgomery, Kansas, where 
he completed his schooling. He then returned east to 
Ohio and in 1884 located in Vermilion County. Four years 
later he became interested in the meat business at West- 
ville, which he successfully conducted until 1900. He then 
removed to Georgetown, where he entered the building 
business as a contractor. In 1910 he went to Greene 
County, Indiana, where he farmed until 1916. He then 
returned to Georgetown where he resumed his building 
activities. 

In 1886 Mr. Dukes married Miss Catherine Ellsworth, 
of Westville, the daughter of S. T. and Zerelda (Graves) 
Ellsworth, natives of Ohio and Kentucky, respectively. 
Mr. Ellsworth died in 1901 and his wife died in 1886. Both 
are buried at Westville. Six children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Dukes, as follows: (1) Maude, born in 1886, a 
graduate of Georgetown High School, married in 1905 to 
Dr. J. H. Myers, dentist, lives at Georgetown, and they 
have a daughter, Kathryn Myers. (2) Fan M., born in 
1888, married Roy Bennett, lives at Georgetown. (3) Fred 
M., twin brother of Fan M., a graduate of Georgetown 
High School, now a well known physician at Dugger, 
Indiana, married Cecilia Weaver, of Urbana, Illinois, and 
they have four children: William, Richard, Joseph, and 
Marcella Dukes. (4) Bert E., born in 1890, a graduate 
of Georgetown High School, lives at Georgetown, married 
Nellie Price. (5) R. F., a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this history. (6) Clarence E., born in 1894, lives 
at Georgetown. He is a veteran of the World War. He 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 933 

married Eva Bell, and they have a son, Don Ellsworth 
Dukes. 

Mr. Dukes has always been a Republican. He has 
served seven continuous terms as supervisor of George- 
town Township and was overseer of the poor for two 
years. He holds membership in the Christian Church, and 
is a member of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Catlin 
Lodge No. 285. Mr. and Mrs. Dukes have a wide circle 
of friends in Vermilion County and are highly esteemed 
members of their community. 



R. F. Dukes, who is cashier of the First National Bank, 
of Georgetown, is a veteran of the World War and one 
of the most prominent young business men of the city. 
He was born at Westville, in 1892, the son of W. C. and 
Catherine (Ellsworth) Dukes. 

A sketch of W. C. Dukes appears elsewhere in this 
history. 

R. F. Dukes obtained his education in the public schools 
of Westville and attended the Georgetown High School. 
He was employed as a clerk in Henderson Brothers gro- 
cery store and later was connected with C. E. Pritchard's 
lumber business. In 1912 he became a mail carrier in the 
local post office but after six months resigned to accept 
the position as a clerk in the First National Bank. He 
was later promoted to assistant cashier but in June, 1918, 
enlisted for service in the World War, and was sent to 
Camp Jackson, South Carolina, where he remained 
throughout the war period. Upon his return to George- 
town, Mr. Dukes became cashier of the First National 
Bank, in which capacity he has since served. 

Mr. Dukes was married in July, 1920, to Miss Florence 
Taylor, of Janesville, Illinois, the daughter of Stephen and 



934 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mary Taylor. They have a son, William, born March 29, 
1923. 

Mr. Dukes is a member of the American Legion and 
has numerous other lodge and club affiliations. 



John A. Frazier, of Georgetown, represents one of the 
prominent and respected families of Vermilion County. 
He was born at Georgetown, October 15, 1873, the son of 
William and Jennie (Alexander) Frazier. 

Abram Frazier came from New Market, Tennessee, to 
Georgetown in 1826. Soon after he returned to Tennessee 
and in 1828 again made the trip to Georgetown, bringing 
with him his brother, Abner. They engaged in the general 
mercantile business on the site of the present Frazier store 
in Georgetown. In 1859 Abram Frazier retired from busi- 
ness, and disposed of his interests to Captain Kyger, who 
later served in the Civil War as a member of the Seventy- 
third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The business continued 
as Frazier & Kyger until 1867, and from 1867 until 1873 
was known as Frazier & Moore, the members of the firm 
being Abner Frazier and William Moore. In 1873 it 
became Abner Frazier & Son. William Frazier, father of 
the subject of this sketch, enlisted in the Civil War in 
1862 and served as a member of the One Hundred Twenty- 
fifth Volunteer Infantry. He was with General Sherman 
on his March to the Sea, and also participated in the 
Grand Review at Washington, D. C. From 1875 until 
1880 his store was known as Abner Frazier & Sons, the 
third member of the firm being John Frazier. It carried 
on business from 1880 until 1885 as Frazier Brothers; 
from 1885 until 1892 was conducted by William Frazier; 
from 1892 until 1900 it was known as William Frazier & 
Son, John A. Frazier, the subject of this sketch, being the 
junior member. Since 1900 J. A. Frazier has continued 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 935 

proprietor of the business, which has been successfully 
carried on for exactly one hundred and one years. 

William Frazier, father of the subject of this sketch, 
was born at Georgetown, Illinois, December 4, 1842, and 
died at Georgetown in November, 1916. He married 
Jennie Alexander, who was born at Eugene, Indiana, Octo- 
ber 25, 1846. She died in November, 1927, at the age of 
eighty-one years and is buried at Georgetown. William 
Frazier was the son of Abner and Mary (Millikan) 
Frazier. To Mr. and Mrs. Frazier were born four chil- 
dren: Birdie, died at the age of nine months; John A., 
the subject of this sketch; a daughter died in infancy; 
and Mayme, born in 1880, deputy county circuit clerk, lives 
at Danville. She married Roy Seymour, who died in 1918. 

John A. Frazier attended the public schools of George- 
town and throughout his business career has been identi- 
fied with the business which was founded at Georgetown 
by his grandfather in 1828. It is among the largest stores 
in this section of the county and handles a complete line 
of men's furnishings and shoes. 

On April 4, 1895, Mr. Frazier was united in marriage 
with Miss Stella Fowler, of Georgetown, the daughter of 
William and Elizabeth Jane (Calvert) Fowler. Mrs. 
Frazier is a graduate of Georgetown High School in the 
class of 1893, and served for twenty-eight years as a mem- 
ber of the local board of education, having resigned from 
that office in 1928. She is also a member of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution. Mr. and Mrs. Frazier have 
two children: Mary Elizabeth, born January 9, 1897, a 
graduate of Georgetown High School, and Illinois Women's 
College, and has taken graduate work at Columbia Uni- 
versity, now a teacher in the Danville High School; and 
William Fowler, born December 12, 1898, a graduate of 
Georgetown High School and Wabash College. He has 
also taken graduate work at Columbia University and is 
now director of athletics in East Saint Louis High School. 



936 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

He is a veteran of the World War, having served in France 
with the United States Marines. He was married August 
10, 1927, to Gladys Elizabeth Tucker, of Hume, Illinois, and 
they have a son, William Tucker Frazier. 

Mr. Frazier has always been a Republican, and has 
held the office of mayor of Georgetown for two terms. 



C. S. Paxton. — An almost meteoric business success 
has been achieved by C. S. Paxton, president and founder 
of the "Grab It Here Stores," and one of the most prom- 
inent citizens of Georgetown. He was born at Charleston, 
West Virginia, July 26, 1879, the son of C. F. and Mar- 
garet (Zirkle) Paxton. 

C. F. Paxton was born in Roanoke County, Virginia, 
spent part of his life in Kentucky, and in 1901 came to 
Georgetown, where he was living retired at the time of 
his death in 1915. He was a Democrat and a member of 
the Christian Church. His widow, born in Virginia, lives 
at Georgetown. The following children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. C. F. Paxton: C. S., the subject of this sketch; 
Ira, lives in New Mexico; T. C, lives at Georgetown; Atha, 
lives at Georgetown; Nina, deceased; Frank, lives in Chi- 
cago; Sarah, married George Gardner, lives at George- 
town; and Collins, lives at Other, Illinois. 

C. S. Paxton was six years old when his family went 
to Kentucky from Virginia. He attended the University 
of Kentucky and Hamilton University at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. In 1901 Mr. Paxton settled at Georgetown where 
he was employed in the coal mines for three years. He 
became a clerk in the Miner's Cooperative Store at George- 
town in 1905, and the following year purchased a small 
store with a capital of $185. Today Mr. Paxton is the 
owner of the largest individually owned chain of grocery 
stores in this section of the country, having transacted a 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 937 

million dollars worth of business in 1928. The company 
owns and operates thirty stores in Illinois and Indiana, 
with headquarters at Danville, where a large warehouse 
handles a stock of groceries valued at $200,000. 

In 1900 Mr. Paxton married Miss Lucy V. Warner, of 
Owingsville, Kentucky, the daughter of Reuben and Louise 
Warner. Mr. Warner died in 1895 and his wife died in 
1922. Mr. and Mrs. Paxton are the parents of two chil- 
dren: Ernest, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in 
this history; and Margaret, born in 1905, married James 
Rice, lives at Georgetown. 

Mr. Paxton is a member of the Methodist Church and 
is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. He 
is a Republican in politics and has served as mayor of 
Georgetown. 



Charles Muirhead, chief of the fire department at Dan- 
ville, is among the well known men of the city, where he 
h^s spent his entire life. He was born here, September 23, 
1884, the son of David and Marion (Fisher) Muirhead. 

David Muirhead and his wife were born in Scotland. 
He came to this country in 1883 and settled at Danville, 
where he was employed in the coal mines for many years. 
He died in this city in 1917 and is buried in Danville. His 
widow lives at 603 Chandler Street. Seven children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Muirhead, as follows: Robert; 
David; Charles, the subject of this sketch; William; James; 
John M.; and Thomas T., who died in 1926, was a World 
War veteran. All are residents of Danville. 

Charles Muirhead received his education in the public 
schools of Danville and as a boy was employed in the coal 
mines. In 1911 he entered the employ of the local fire 
department, where he spent six years. He then returned 
to the mines and in 1922 was appointed deputy sheriff of 
Vermilion County under Sheriff Timm. He served in that 



938 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

capacity until May 1, 1923, at which time he again became 
identified with the fire department as assistant chief. In 
1925 he became custodian of the Masonic Temple Build- 
ing, but in May, 1927, assumed his present duties as chief 
of the fire department. 

In 1915 Mr. Muirhead married Miss Anna M. Brown, 
of Danville, the daughter of Charles and Minnie Brown, 
natives of Germany, now residents of Danville. Mr. and 
Mrs. Muirhead have no children. 

Mr. Muirhead has always been a Republican. He 
attends the Methodist Church, and belongs to the Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, Anchor Lodge No. 980, Past 
Master; Danville Consistory, Past Thrice Potent Master; 
Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 82; Danville 
Eastern Star, No. 854, Past Patron; White Shrine of Jeru- 
salem, No. 65; and Grotto. 



George S. Hoff. — Numbered among the highly success- 
ful business men and representative citizens of Danville is 
George S. Hoff, realtor and specialist in farm loans and 
insurance, with offices in the Daniel Building. He was 
born in Butler Township, Vermilion County, February 7, 
1859, the son of Amos and Harriet A. (Blackford) Hoff. 

Amos Hoff was born in Montgomery County, Indiana, 
and was among the earliest settlers of Butler Township, 
Vermilion County, where he successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming until 1905. He then retired and removed to 
Rossville, Illinois, where he resided until 1917. He then 
came to Danville and lived there until the time of his 
death in 1920. He is buried at Potomac, Illinois. His 
wife was born in Fountain County, Indiana and died in 
1921. Mr. Hoff was active in church work throughout his 
life and was one of the organizers of the Baptist Church 
at Point Pleasant, which is now abandoned. The following 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 939 

children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hoff: George S., the 
subject of this sketch; Jerusha A., the widow of John 0. 
Jenkins, later married B. E. Lane, and they live at Hen- 
ning, Illinois; Minnie C, died in 1925, was the wife of 
Samuel H. Crandall; and Margaret M., married Henry 
Howell, lives near Henning, Illinois. 

George S. Hoff attended the rural schools of Butler 
Township and completed his schooling at Danville. He 
began his teaching career in a district school known as 
Hedge Corner, near Rossville and in 1884 entered Normal 
University at Normal, Illinois, where he spent two years. 
He then resumed teaching and in 1889 taught at the Oak- 
wood School. He purchased a farm four miles north of 
Muncie, Illinois, and two years later became principal of 
schools at Catlin, Illinois, and from there to Indianola, 
Illinois. In 1895 he re-entered Normal University and 
subsequently became principal of the Ottawa schools. 
However, due to ill health, he was obliged to retire from 
the teaching profession, and in 1897 Mr. Hoff came to 
Danville, where he became interested in the real estate 
business. He has always made a specialty of handling- 
farm loans and was one of the organizers and secretary 
and treasurer of the Farm Loan Association of Danville. 
He has now associated with him in business his daughter, 
Miss Reva Clair Hoff, the firm being known as George S. 
Hoff & Daughter. The Danville National Farm Loan 
Association is among the largest loan associations in the 
State, having loans outstanding in Vermilion County 
amounting to more than one million seven hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

In 1888 Mr. Hoff was united in marriage with Miss 
Carrie B. Vinson, the daughter of John E. and Elizabeth 
E. (Trimmel) Vinson. Mr. Hoff gives to his wife much 
credit for whatever success he has made in life. The for- 
mer, Mr. Vinson, was born in Kentucky, died in 1893. He 
was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church and 



940 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

rode the circuit of Vermilion County for many years. His 
wife, born in Vermilion County, died in 1913. Mr. and 
Mrs. HofFs only child is Reva Clair. She was educated in 
the public schools of Danville and following her graduation 
from Danville High School in 1909 she entered Northwest- 
ern University, where she specialized in the study of music. 
She was graduated in 1913 and was identified with Chau- 
tauqua and lyceum work for five years, after which she 
became associated with her father's business in Danville. 
She became a member of the firm in 1923. Miss Hoff is 
secretary and treasurer of the Danville National Farm 
Loan Association, which is the local representative of the 
Federal Land Bank of Saint Louis, Missouri. She is also 
Past President of the Danville Business and Professional 
Women's Club. Her experience in chautauqua and lyceum 
work have served her greatly in making her rank among 
the most able speakers at civic and business meetings. 
She is frequently called upon to make speeches and 
addresses throughout the county and state. Miss Hoff 
lives at home with her parents in Danville. 

Politically, Mr. Hoff is a Republican. He is a member 
of the Methodist Church and has been secretary of the 
official board of formerly Kimber and now what is known 
as the Saint James Methodist Episcopal Church for twen- 
ty-seven years. He is president of the Board of Trustees 
of Lake View Hospital, Danville, and was one of the 
organizers of the Hospital Association of Illinois. He was 
active in the founding of the Vermilion County Farm 
Bureau and was one of the organizers of the Danville Real 
Estate Board and the Illinois Association of Real Estate 
Boards. Mr. Hoff is affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge 
No. 38, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and Danville 
Consistory, thirty-second degree. He is one of the most 
public spirited citizens of Danville and is recognized as an 
able business man and excellent citizen. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 941 

George Sedlmayr, well known as one of the leading and 
representative citizens of Danville, was born at Munich, 
Bavaria, September 15, 1868, and is of German origin. 
His parents, George and Anna (Stulberger) Sedlmayr, 
spent their entire lives in Germany. The father occupied 
an important position in the government employ, being 
in charge of the mails for a great many years, having 
succeeded his father in that business. He was born in 
1840 and died in Munich May 23, 1889. His wife, who 
was born in 1845, died November 4, 1888. 

Like most boys of German birth, George Sedlmayr was 
given good educational advantages and was graduated 
from the high school of Munich, August 8, 1885. It was 
on May 12, 1893, that he began his voyage to America to 
become a resident of the new world. He located at first 
in Chicago, where he spent five years as a brewer in the 
employ of the Peter Schoenhofen Brewing Company. On 
September 7, 1898, he was promoted to brewmaster, which 
position he filled until December 7, 1903, when he removed 
with his family to Danville, becoming financially interested 
in the Danville Brewing Company, which was later 
changed to the Fecker Brewing Company. Mr. Sedlmayr 
served as secretary and brewmaster of this company for 
a number of years and after the company was reorganized 
as the Fecker Company Mr. Sedlmayr continued as secre- 
tary, in which capacity he now serves. He is also vice 
president, and has been identified with the interests of 
this business for thirty-one years. 

On January 7, 1899, Mr. Sedlmayr was united in mar- 
riage at Chicago, Illinois, with Miss Lydia Reisenegger, 
whose parents were residents of that city. Her father, 
now deceased, was at one time in the employ of the city 
map department as manager under Mayor Harrison. Mr. 
and Mrs. Sedlmayr have three children, namely: George 
W., born March 23, 1900, died June 22, 1914, buried in 
Springhill Cemetery, Danville; Clara, born August 4, 1908, 



942 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

employed by the Palmer National Bank, lives at home; and 
Ernest Frank, born January 28, 1924, lives at home. 

Prior to his emigration to America Mr. Sedlmayr 
served one year in the German army from 1888 until 1889. 
He was not compelled to remain in the service longer due 
to the fact that he had acquired a higher education than 
most young men were given. 

On national issues Mr. Sedlmayr usually votes the 
Republican ticket, but at local elections he supports the 
man whom he believes best qualified to fill the offices. He 
and his family are members of the Catholic Church and 
he is identified with the Moose Lodge, Knights of Colum- 
bus, and Danville Turner Society, of which he has been 
secretary for the past twenty years. He is also a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and Loyal 
Order of Moose. 

Mr. Sedlmayr is public spirited and progressive and 
supports every movement which he believes will prove of 
general good to the community. He has always been 
regarded as one of the leading citizens of Danville, the 
city in which he has spent so many years. 



Thomas J. Wodetzki, president of the Danville Tent and 
Awning Company, is one of the leading figures in the 
business life of Danville. He was born at Lincoln, Logan 
County, Illinois, July 25, 1865, the son of Edward L. and 
Josephine (Davis) Wodetzki. 

Edward L. Wodetzki was born in Germany and was 
sixteen years of age when he came to the United States 
and settled in Baltimore, Maryland. He was a carpenter 
by trade and also was a member of the first fire depart- 
ment in the City of Baltimore. Following his marriage in 
1847 he came to Illinois and settled on a farm near Lincoln. 
He retired in 1884 and died in 1911 at the age of ninety- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 943 

two years. His wife, born in Baltimore, died in 1923, age 
ninety-five years. Both are buried at Lincoln, Illinois. 
They had the following children: Edward, lives at Dan- 
ville ; Mary, married William McCoy, lives at Decatur, Illi- 
nois; Julia, died in 1929, was the wife of George Larison; 
John, who died in 1882; Katheryne, married Alex Steward, 
lives at Peoria, Illinois; Thomas J., the subject of this 
sketch; L. L., lives at Peoria; and C. C, lives at Lincoln, 
Illinois. 

Thomas J. Wodetzki received his education in the 
schools of Lincoln, Illinois. When twenty years of age he 
went to Rawlins County, Kansas, where he took up a claim 
of one hundred and sixty acres and where he remained 
for three years. From there he went to Forth Smith, 
Arkansas, where he farmed and raised cotton for two 
years, after which he located at Saint Joe, Missouri. 
While in that city he was employed by the Seick Manufac- 
turing Company, makers of awnings and tents. After 
two years he returned to Lincoln, Illinois, where he 
engaged in business for himself as a manufacturer of 
awnings and tents. In five years he sold his business inter- 
ests and located at Peoria, Illinois. In 1902 he came to 
Danville, where he established his present business. It 
was formerly located on College Street and in 1906 was 
moved to 423 East Main Street. In 1911 the business was 
again moved to 202 West Main Street, and in 1916 to its 
present location, 248-50 West Main Street. The Danville 
Tent and Awning Company are specialists in canvas, the 
slogan of the company being, "If it is made of Canvas, we 
make it." Branch stores are maintained at Kankakee and 
Mount Vernon. 

On December 29, 1896, Mr. Wodetzki was united in 
marriage with Miss Kathryne Crain, of Lincoln, Illinois, 
the daughter of William H. and Amanda (Stevens) Crain. 
The former, born at Dayton, Ohio, died in 1921. The latter 
died in 1924. Mr. and Mrs. Wodetzki are the parents of 



944 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

six children: Glen A., associated in business with his 
father, married Catherine Werner; Thelma J., graduate 
nurse, lives at Shelby, Montana; Kathryne, married 
Volanid Vaught, lives in Chicago; Lewis, lives at Tilton; 
Henry, and Ethel May, both at home. 

In politics Mr. Wodetzki is identified with the Demo- 
cratic party and at the present time is serving his first 
term as mayor of Tilton. He and his family hold mem- 
bership in the Second Presbyterian Church and he is 
affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. 



Benjamin B. Taylor. — One of the outstanding citizens 
of Vermilion County is Benjamin B. Taylor, who is presi- 
dent of the Taylor-English Coal Company, of Catlin. He 
was born at Catlin, January 4, 1878, the son of Thomas A. 
and Mary C. (Acre) Taylor. 

Thomas A. Taylor was born at Romney, Ind. He was a 
graduate of Millikin University, and for a number of 
years taught school. He became the owner of one thousand 
two hundred acres of land in Vermilion County, which he 
operated for many years. He was a director of the First 
National Bank of Catlin, a director of the First National 
Bank of Oakwood, and president for ten years of Lakeview 
Hospital, Danville. Mr. Taylor was widely known for his 
numerous deeds of charity and was a valuable citizen of 
the community in which he lived. He was a Republican, 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, Catlin Lodge, No. 
285, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Danville Con- 
sistory, thirty-second degree, Royal Arch Mason, and 
Knights Templar. Mr. Taylor died May 27, 1924, and his 
wife died October 28, 1927. Both are buried at Catlin. 
They had the following children : Clemmer, married C. C. 
Andrews, who is president of the First National Bank, 
Oakwood, Illinois; Gail H., farmer, lives at Catlin; Elvessa, 




BENJAMIN B. TAYLOR 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 945 

lives at Catlin; Joseph, retired, lives at Catlin; Benja- 
min B., the subject of this sketch; Robert, lives at Catlin; 
Margaret, deceased, was the wife of C. W. Wherry, Catlin ; 
Catherine, married H. E. Douglas, a sketch of whom ap- 
pears elsewhere in this history; Lois, married Lawrence 
Church, lives at Catlin; Thomas W., lives at Catlin; and 
Harriet, married Conrad Howard, lives at Wilmington, 
Illinois. 

Benjamin B. Taylor obtained his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Catlin and after his graduation from Catlin 
Township High School in 1898 he entered the store of G. W. 
Tilton as a clerk, in which capacity he served for five years. 
In 1903, in partnership with his brother, Joseph, he en- 
gaged in the general merchandise business. Mr. Taylor or- 
ganized the Danville Collier Company in 1907, with mines 
at Catlin, and he became president of the company. He 
organized the Indiana Semi-Block Coal Company in 1911 
and operated mines at Cates, Indiana, also becoming presi- 
dent of that company. Mr. Taylor organized the Taylor- 
English Coal Company in 1918 and the company purchased 
the interests of the Catlin Coal Company, as well as other 
coal lands in this section. He became president of the Chi- 
cago Colliers Company, which was organized in 1920, and 
this corporation owned 2,000 acres of land, known as the 
Keisler Hill, near Catlin. It became a $600,000.00 corpora- 
tion and was sold in 1925 to the United Electric Coal Com- 
pany. Mr. Taylor was also one of the organizers of the 
Shipps-Timber Company in 1921, of which he became 
president. 

September 19, 1900, Mr. Taylor married Miss Cora 
Partlow, the daughter of George and Irene (English) Part- 
low, the former a native of Joliet, Illinois, and the latter 
of Perrysville, Indiana. He is deceased and his widow lives 
at Catlin. Mrs. Taylor is the granddaughter of J. G. Eng- 
lish, who was the founder and president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Danville. Mrs. Cora Taylor was born in 

2&— Vol. 2 



946 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Danville, where she graduated from the high school and 
taught school in Danville until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. 
Taylor have one daughter, Josephine. She is a graduate of 
Catlin Township High School, Ward-Belmont College, 
Nashville, Tennessee, and the University of Illinois. She is 
now employed in her father's office. 

Mr. Taylor is a Republican. He is a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the Presbyterian Church, and belongs 
to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332, 
and Danville Country Club. The Taylor residence at Cat- 
lin, situated on twelve acres of land, is among the most 
beautiful homes in the county. Mr. Taylor also is the owner 
of a fine farm of 260 acres. 



John F. Shimkus. — As postmaster of Westville, Mr. 
Shimkus, a veteran of the World War, is numbered among 
the representative young men of Vermilion County. He 
was born in Lithuania, October 23, 1896, the son of Frank 
and Ursula (Warnagis) Shimkus. 

Frank Shimkus, who died January 31, 1925, was a 
native of Lithuania. His wife, also born there, died in 
1927. Both are buried at Westville. Mr. Shimkus was a 
farmer in early life and after his arrival in this country 
he worked in the coal mines of Pennsylvania and Illinois. 
He met with an accidental death in the mines. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Shimkus eight children were born, two of whom 
survive: Lean, married Michael Ranktis, lives at West- 
ville; and John F., the subject of this sketch. 

John F. Shimkus received his education in the public 
schools of Chicago and Westville, and after his gradua- 
tion from Westville High School he attended Brown's 
Business College, Danville. Mr. Shimkus was employed 
in the coal mines near Danville and later entered the offices 
of the Bunsen Coal Company, Westville, as assistant pay- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 947 

roll clerk. After three years he became assistant cashier 
of the First National Bank, Westville, and two years later 
was engaged as payroll clerk for the United States Fuel 
Company, formerly the Bunsen Coal Company, at Benton, 
Illinois. In June, 1918, he volunteered for service in the 
World War and enlisted in the United States Navy at 
Great Lakes Station, Chicago. He was discharged Decem- 
ber 22, 1918, and upon his return to Westville became 
interested in business. He was appointed postmaster of 
Westville in January, 1920, and has since held that office. 

On September 25, 1917, Mr. Shimkus was united in 
marriage with Miss Bertha Possolt, of Westville, the 
daughter of John and Emma (Stark) Possolt, the former 
a native of Germany and the latter of Georgetown, Illi- 
nois. He died November 1, 1925, and his widow lives at 
Westville. To Mr. and Mrs. Shimkus have been born two 
daughters: Emma Lou, born December 8, 1921; and 
Phyllis Jane, born December 1, 1925. 

Politically, Mr. Shimkus is a Republican. He holds 
membership in Saint Peter's and Saint Paul's Catholic 
Church, Knights of Columbus, Loyal Order of Moose, and 
American Business Club, Danville. He was active in the 
organization of the Martin F. Vutrick Post No. 51, West- 
ville, of the American Legion, and served as its first 
Commander. 



L. H. Mennel is prominent in business circles in Dan- 
ville, where he is superintendent of the Illinois Power & 
Light Corporation. He was born at Quincy, Illinois, 
November 12, 1898, the son of Adam and Emma (Timpe) 
Mennel. 

Adam Mennel, who died in 1914, was a native of Illi- 
nois. He was born at Burton and when ten years of age 
went to Quincy with his family, where he was educated. 



948 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

He became a well known building contractor and was 
engaged in that work until his death. He met with an 
accidental death during the building of a bank in Quincy. 
His widow lives in that city. Their children were: L. H., 
the subject of this sketch; Clarence and Adelia, who live 
at Quincy. 

L. H. Mennel attended the public schools of Quincy 
and Gem City Business College. He began his business 
career with the S. M. Willmer Company, chain store oper- 
ators. The business was subsequently sold to L. R. Steele 
Corporation of Buffalo, New York, and Mr. Mennel re- 
mained in the employ of the new concern. He became 
store manager in Danville and in 1924 accepted a posi- 
tion with the Illinois Power & Light Company as assistant 
to F. A. Tucker. In August, 1928, he became superin- 
tendent. 

Politically Mr. Mennel is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church and Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, Lodge No. 535. 



Henry Bireline, of Henry Bireline Company, Inc., sheet 
metal and roofing specialists, is recognized as one of the 
substantial business men of Danville, and is a member of 
one of the oldest families of Vermilion County. He was 
born in this city, June 8, 1864, the son of John Adam and 
Catherine (Stickler) Bireline. 

Both John Adam Bireline and his wife were natives of 
Germany. He was a butcher by trade and in 1858 emi- 
grated to the United States and settled at Circleville, Ohio. 
He later removed to Williamsport, Indiana, and in 1860 
came to Danville, where he entered the mercantile business. 
About 1876 Mr. Bireline sold his interests in this city and 
went to Dewitt, Arkansas, where he purchased a large 
farm. He died October 1, 1877, at the age of fifty years. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 949 

His wife, born in 1830, died in 1917, and is buried in Spring- 
Hill Cemetery, Danville. They were the parents of four 
children: Andrew, lives in Florida; Henry, the subject 
of this sketch; Anna, who died in 1917, was the wife of 
Charles Brady; and John, who died in 1917. 

Henry Bireline grew up in Danville and attended the 
public schools. He was twelve years old when he went to 
Arkansas with his parents. He returned to Danville, how- 
ever, after several years, and as a boy was employed in a 
local restaurant, where he received wages of one dollar 
and fifty cents per week and board. He later was employed 
as an errand boy by J. G. English, banker. At an early 
age he became interested in roofing and tinning and was 
employed by Haven, VanSickel & Barker for about ten 
years. In 1892, in partnership with John W. Orr, Mr. 
Bireline engaged in business for himself on the present 
site of the Adams Building on North Vermilion Street. 
After three years the company purchased property at 121- 
23 North Walnut Street where they erected a building. 
Mr. Bireline became sole owner of the business in 1915 
and remained at the former location until 1924, at which 
time he purchased property at 615 North Hazel Street, 
where he erected his sheet metal and roofing plant. The 
business was incorporated in 1916 and since that time his 
sons, Robert and Leo, have been identified with the 
business. 

Mr. Bireline was married September 6, 1886, to Miss 
Emma Diehl, of Danville, the daughter of Frank and Fred- 
ericka Diehl, natives of Germany, both now deceased. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Bireline were born five children: 1. Kate 
Ellen, born July 13, 1887, married on June 10, 1912, to 
Walter Meek. She died in 1918. 2. Robert Franklin, born 
March 6, 1890, lives at Danville. He was married April 5, 
1916, to Nell Porter, of Danville, and they have a son, 
Henry Porter Bireline. 3. Leo Henry, born June 19, 1894, 
lives at Danville. He was married April 4, 1916, to Ruby 



950 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Dot Bodine, and they have two children, Margaret Emma, 
and Robert Allen. 4. Florence Charlotte, born November 
29, 1897. She was married in 1919 to Harry Bennett, of 
Danville, and they have two children, Billie and Barbara. 
5. Emily Louise, born September 23, 1908, lives at home. 

Mr. Bireline has always been a Republican. He is an 
active member of Saint James Methodist Church and is 
affiliated with the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Olive Branch Lodge, No. 38; Danville Consistory, thirty- 
second degree; Athelstan Commandery; Medinah Shrine, 
Chicago; Gao Grotto, Danville; Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Red 
Men; and Ben Hur. 

Mr. Bireline is the owner of large tracts of land in 
Florida and has four hundred acres planted in pecans near 
Gainesville, where he and his family spend the winter 
months. A beautiful home was built on the plantation 
there by Mr. Bireline several years ago. 



Fritz Schriever. — One of the well known young busi- 
ness men of Rossville is Fritz Schriever, who is identified 
with the Shell Petroleum Company as manager of the Shell 
Service Station at Rossville. He was born in Hamm in 
Westf alien, Germany, March 29, 1883, the son of Theodore 
and Elizabeth T. Schriever. 

Theodore Schriever was born in Germany, where he 
spent his entire life. He died in 1900 and his wife died 
in 1917. Mr. Schriever served in the German Army and 
was identified with the railroad service for a number of 
years as a conductor. He later was employed as superin- 
tendent of a wire manufacturing company. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Schriever were born four children: Henry, lives in 
Germany; Elizabeth, died at the age of sixteen years; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 951 

Fritz, the subject of this sketch; and Walter, who lives in 
Germany. 

Fritz Schriever was reared and educated in Germany 
and shortly after his marriage went to Brazil, South 
America, where he took up a tract of three hundred and 
fifty acres of government land. After a year he accepted 
a railway position and engaged in construction work 
throughout the mountain regions of that section of South 
America. He served in this capacity for two years and 
endured continual hardship in that primitive country, 
being in contact with Indians, and wild animals. On 
numerous occasions the men found it necessary to build 
bonfires around their camps to keep away the hostile 
Indians. After his return to Brazil, Mr. Schriever became 
interested in the lithograph business and in 1912 went to 
Germany. He came to the United States in July, 1913, 
and located at Collison, Illinois, where he operated a black- 
smith shop for two years. He then entered the employ 
of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad and in 1921 
came to Rossville, where he was employed in the com- 
pany's shops until 1924. He has since been identified with 
the Shell Petroleum Company in Rossville, and manages 
one of the largest stations in this section of the State. 

In August, 1902, Mr. Schriever was united in marriage 
with Miss Wilhelmina Weidili, of Germany, the daughter 
of John and Walburga Weidili, both deceased. They have 
two children: Elizabeth, a graduate of Rossville High 
School, now studying piano and voice at Danville; and 
Walter, born in 1913, attends Rossville High School. 

Mr. Schriever is a Republican, a member of the Meth- 
odist Church, and is affiliated with Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Lodge No. 714; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Danville Shrine; and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is serving his second term as 
a member of the Rossville School Board and is especially 



952 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

interested in education. It was largely through his efforts 
that the commercial department was introduced into the 
Rossville school system. 



Samuel C. Crispin, M. D., is one of the young and 
capable professional men of Danville, where he is engaged 
in the practice of medicine with offices at 916 East Fair- 
child Street. 

Doctor Crispin is a graduate of the School of Medicine, 
Loyola University, Chicago, class of 1922. He served his 
interneship in Saint Anthony's Hospital, Terre Haute, 
Indiana, and came to Danville in 1923. He has since 
engaged in general practice in this city. 

Doctor Crispin was united in marriage to Ethel Ann 
Lenning, of Coal City, Indiana, after completing his 
interneship in 1923 and has two sons, Samuel Byron and 
Robert Stanton Crispin. Their residence is located at 
1902 North Gilbert Street, Danville, Illinois. 

Doctor Crispin is identified with the Vermilion County 
Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, and Amer- 
ican Medical Association. He is also a member of the 
Aesculapian Society of Wabash Valley, and the Association 
for the Study of Internal Secretions. 



J. M. James, M. D., is one of the representative physi- 
cians and surgeons of Vermilion County, successfully 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Henning. He 
was born in Champaign County, Illinois, August 24, 1877, 
the son of John A. and Mary (Beauchamp) James. 

John A. James was born in Vigo County, Indiana, as 
was also his wife. He was a farmer. He died in 1919 and 
his wife died in 1914. Both are buried in Mayview Ceme- 
tery, Mayview, Illinois. They were the parents of five chil- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 953 

dren: Frank M., lives at Conway, Arkansas; Albert R., 
lives at Henning; Rosa Winchester, lives at Urbana, Illi- 
nois; Chester A., lives at Indianapolis, Indiana; and J. M., 
the subject of this sketch. 

J. M. James was educated in the public schools of 
Champaign County and then entered the Medical Depart- 
ment of Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. In the same year he established his resi- 
dence in Henning, and here he has built up a most sub- 
stantial general practice. 

On March 6, 1907, Doctor James was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Aural C. Lane, of Henning, the daughter 
of Alonzo W. and Mary (Lewis) Lane, natives of Illinois 
and Wales, respectively. He died in 1925 and his wife 
died in 1927. Doctor and Mrs. James have no children. 

Doctor James is a Republican and is affiliated with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Scottish Rite, Danville, and Moham- 
med Temple, Peoria, Illinois. 



Judge David C. Ade is among the most substantial and 
representative citizens of Rossville, where he is serving 
as police magistrate and justice of the peace. He was 
born at Dayton, Ohio, January 10, 1859, the son of Chris- 
tian and Mary (Funk) Ade. 

Christian Ade was born in Stuttgard, Germany, where 
he was reared and educated. At the age of twenty-two 
years he came to the United States and settled at Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, where he was married. He went to Day- 
ton, Ohio, in 1858 and subsequently moved to Danville, 
Illinois, just before the Civil War. About 1866 he became 
an intinerant minister of the German United Brethren 
Church. After the death of his wife in 1873 he retired 



954 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

from the ministry and settled on a farm of forty acres 
north of Denmark, Illinois, on the site of the present Ver- 
milion Lake. In 1883 he removed to Cherryville, Kansas, 
where he purchased a farm and where he lived until his 
death in 1892. He is buried at Cherryville, Kansas. To 
Christian and Mary (Funk) Ade were born seven chil- 
dren, as follows: David C, the subject of this sketch; 
Amanda, who died at the age of thirteen years; Ella, who 
died at the age of fifteen years; Emma, married J. W. 
Tremble, lives at Oakwood, Illinois; Edward, lives at 
Cherryville, Kansas; Mary, the widow of Samuel Sanford, 
lives at Indianapolis, Indiana; and Lilly, married Fremont 
Beady, lives at Cherryville, Kansas. 

David C. Ade received his education in the public 
schools of Dayton, Ohio, and later spent four years at the 
Theological Seminary at Dayton, Ohio. He served for a 
period of twenty-five years as a member of the United 
Brethren ministry throughout Illinois and Indiana, and in 
March, 1917, came to Rossville, where he purchased a home 
at 303 East Green Avenue, where he now lives. In April, 
1920, he was elected justice of the peace and on April 6, 
1929, became police magistrate. 

On December 28, 1882, Mr. Ade married Miss Susan 
Tucker, of Danville, the daughter of Henry and Hulda 
(Brown) Tucker, natives of Kentucky and Indiana, re- 
spectively. Mr. Tucker died in 1901 and his wife died in 
1902. Both are buried at Rossville. Mr. and Mrs. Ade 
have nine children, as follows: Irvin H., lives at Lafay- 
ette, Indiana; Ida May, married Claude Stevenson, lives 
at Rossville; William Harrison, who died in 1894; Charles 
Edward, lives in Chicago, Illinois, is a veteran of the World 
War; David C, lives on a farm near Champaign, Illinois, 
is a veteran of the World War; N. W., lives at Hoopeston, 
married Estella Babson, and she died March 22, 1929; 
Dorothy, married 0. W. Murphy, lives at Danville; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 955 

Everett, who died at the age of eight years; and Ruth, 
married Lloyd Robertson, lives at Chicago, Illinois. 

In politics Mr. Ade is identified with the Republican 
party. He is a member of the United Brethren Church 
and takes an active part in church work. He has been 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for 
thirty-two years and has been State Representative to the 
Grand Lodge. He has also been a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America for the same number of years. 



Charles Mires Woodbury. — One of the prominent fig- 
ures in business circles in Vermilion County is Charles 
Mires Woodbury, who is vice president of the Woodbury 
Drug Company, Danville, and a member of one of the 
earliest and best known families of Vermilion County. He 
was born in Danville, on the site of the Fisher Grand 
Opera House, January 15, 1868, the son of Dr. William 
W. R. and Maria Louisa (Williams) Woodbury. 

Dr. William W. R. Woodbury was born in Ripley 
County, Indiana, in 1824, and died February 16, 1901. He 
is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. His third wife, 
Maria Louisa (Williams) Woodbury, was the first white 
child born in Vermilion County, born at Catlin, February 
22, 1827. She died September 9, 1903, and is buried in 
Springhill Cemetery. William W. R. Woodbury was 
reared in Ripley County, Indiana, and was seven years of 
age when his parents came to Danville in 1833. His father 
was a general merchant and fur trader and made numer- 
ous trips to New Orleans, Louisiana, by flat boat, the 
return trip being made by foot or horseback. At the age 
of fifteen years William W. R. Woodbury studied medicine 
with Dr. William E. Fithian, and at the same time attended 
a private school. He was graduated from Rush Medical 
College, Chicago, in 1850 and upon his return to Danville 



956 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

was associated with the drug business of Dr. James A. D. 
Sconce. He later purchased the store and in connection 
with the business he carried on a general practice in medi- 
cine at 79-81 West Main Street. Doctor Woodbury was 
also the founder of the Woodbury Book Company in 1881, 
which was managed by him until 1885, at which time his 
son, Amos Gardner Woodbury, purchased the two stores. 
He operated them successfully until 1901, at which time 
a stock company was formed and the business known as 
the Woodbury Book Company, with Herman B. Wheeler 
as president. In 1903 the Woodbury Drug Company was 
incorporated with A. G. Woodbury as president; Charles 
M. Woodbury as vice president; Charles F. Ehlers, as man- 
ager; and Flora M. Woodbury, as secretary. Doctor Wood- 
bury carried on his private medical practice until his death 
in 1901. As highway commissioner he built the first stone 
and gravel Georgetown Road. He was engaged in many 
business enterprises. He was mayor and laid out Spring- 
hill Cemetery as commissioner. He was numbered among 
the leading citizens of the community and was beloved by 
all who knew him. 

To Dr. William W. R. and Maria Louisa (Williams) 
Woodbury were born the following children : Ernest, who 
died in infancy; Amos Gardner, who died in 1920; Mary, 
who has been blind since the age of four years, is a gradu- 
ate of the Jacksonville Institute for the Blind, and is 
exceedingly talented in music, lives at Danville; Lucy W., 
unmarried, now president of the Woodbury Book Com- 
pany, with which she has been identified for the past forty- 
six years; Charles Mires, the subject of this sketch; Flora 
Maria, unmarried, now secretary of the Woodbury Drug 
Company. All live in the old family homestead at 515 
North Vermilion Street, Danville. 

Charles Mires Woodbury obtained his education in the 
public schools of Danville and is a graduate of the North- 
western College of Pharmacy, Chicago. He became identi- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 957 

fied with his father's drug and book business early in life 
and served as vice president of the Woodbury Drug Com- 
pany from 1903 until 1920, and was succeeded by Charles 
F. Ehlers as president. Mr. Woodbury is now vice presi- 
dent. He was also associated with his brother, the late 
Amos Gardner Woodbury, in the breeding of Jersey cattle 
and Poland China hogs on the Woodbury Hill Farm from 
1895 until 1918, during which time Amos Woodbury served 
as president of the Vermilion County Farmers Institute. 
He increased meetings from one to twelve a year. A. G. 
Woodbury was the father of hard roads movement and 
as supervisor helped first to put it over. A. G. Woodbury 
deserves highest award of merit for extensive work done 
for this modern hard road movement, and was elected 
chief of supervisors for this. Charles Mires Woodbury 
has also had extensive real estate holdings in Danville and 
in 1904 was identified with his brother, Amos G. Wood- 
bury, and his sister, Flora M. Woodbury, in the building 
of the Maria-Louise and Nelsonia, large fifteen apartment 
building in Danville. The Danville Motor Car Company 
building was built and owned by A. G. Woodbury. The 
Chesterfield additions were owned and laid out by A. G. 
and Charles M. Woodbury. 

Mr. Woodbury is affiliated with the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, Ansar Shrine, 
Springfield, Illinois, Knights of Pythias, Loyal Order of 
Moose, Isaac Walton League, and Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He is a member of Saint James 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and belongs to the Sons of 
the American Revolution, and Half Century Club. He is 
unmarried and lives with his sisters at 515 North Ver- 
milion Street. 

Mr. Woodbury has always been interested in the early 
history of Danville and has a fine collection of early photo- 
graphs of the city, part of which were taken by him and 
pioneer photographers. These and pioneer relics shown 



958 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

by him and his sister, Flora M. Woodbury were shown at 
the Vermilion County Centenary and won the silver 
trophy, a huge silver loving cup, and awarded by the Dan- 
ville Chamber of Commerce. 

Gardner Woodbury, paternal grandfather of Mr. Wood- 
bury, was born in Montgomery County, New Hampshire, 
1801, and died at Danville in 1841. The paternal grand- 
mother, Elizabeth (Songer) Woodbury, was born in Rock- 
ingham County, Virginia, about 1800 and died at Dan- 
ville in 1876. The maternal grandfather, Amos Williams, 
was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, in 1797 and 
died at Danville in 1857. He traveled as far west as Little 
Rock, Arkansas, in 1821 and his father, Benjamin Wil- 
liams, and his grandfather, Enoch Williams, fought from 
Bedford County, Pennsylvania, during the Revolutionary 
War. 

Martha Shaw Williams, wife of Amos Williams, was 
born in Christian County, Kentucky, and lived at Paris, 
Illinois, when she married Amos Williams in 1826. Grand- 
mother (maternal) of C. M. Woodbury. 



J. S. Purnell, mayor of Fithian, is a substantial and 
well known citizen of Vermilion County. He was born in 
Fountain County, Indiana, May 26, 1858, the son of George 
W. and Nancy (Henry) Purnell. 

George W. Purnell was born in Fountain County, Indi- 
ana, February 13, 1834. He followed general farming and 
stock raising throughout his life and after his retirement 
lived at Danville. He died there, December 13, 1908, and 
his wife, born in Brighton County, Kentucky, December 
16, 1832, died October 18, 1893. Both are buried in Stearns 
Cemetery, Fithian. The Purnell family came to Indiana 
about 1830. To Mr. and Mrs. George W. Purnell six chil- 
dren were born : Emma, born August 30, 1855, died Feb- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 959 

ruary 11, 1860; J. S., the subject of this sketch; Ella, born 
October 24, 1862, died in infancy; Arthur, born August 
24, 1864, died in 1912; J. E., born in 1869, lives at Danville; 
and Dr. W. F., dentist, born June 22, 1872, lives at Veeders- 
burg, Indiana. Mr. Purnell was a Republican and a mem- 
ber of the old Christian Church, which was organized in 
1808. 

J. S. Purnell lived in Indiana until 1871 and was edu- 
cated in the district schools of Fountain County. He 
became a farmer and at one time owned several large 
farms in Vermilion County. He lived at Oakwood for 
several years and has been a resident of Fithian since 
1923. Mr. Purnell is still the owner of a fine farm of two 
hundred and sixty acres, which is located north of Bron- 
son, Illinois. 

Mr. Purnell was elected supervisor of Oakwood Town- 
ship in 1893 and has served as a member of the board for 
twenty-two years with the exception of three terms. He 
became mayor of Fithian in 1927 and has proven himself 
to be a most efficient and trustworthy administrator. 

Mr. Purnell was married, October 8, 1879, to Miss 
Fannie M. Lucas, of Fountain County, Indiana, the daugh- 
ter of J. G. and Jane (Sanford) Lucas, natives of Indiana 
and Kentucky, respectively. Both are deceased. Mrs. 
Purnell's grandfather Lucas was born in London, Eng- 
land, and was fifteen years old when he came to this coun- 
try. He became a prosperous merchant of Chambersburg, 
Indiana, where he engaged in business for more than forty 
years. He died at the age of seventy-five years. To J. S. 
and Fannie M. (Lucas) Purnell three children were born: 
Earl, born March 19, 1883, died December 23, 1885; Goldie, 
born February 5, 1888, married in 1906 to Dr. R. E. John- 
son, and she died in 1917, buried in Stearns Cemetery, 
Fithian ;W. Frank, born in 1895, a graduate of Danville 
High School and the University of Illinois, married Hazel 



960 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Shepperd, and they have three children. He operates his 
father's farm near Bronson. 

Mr. Purnell has always been a Republican. He is a 
member of the Christian Church and is affiliated with the 
Masonic Lodge and Consistory. Both he and his wife are 
active in the social and civic life of the community. 



Charles Virgil Tilton. — One of the prominent business 
men of Fairmount is Charles V. Tilton, who is a member 
of one of the oldest and best known families of Vermilion 
County. He was born at Catlin, Illinois, March 21, 1863, 
the son of George W. and Lizzie A. (Albright) Tilton. 

George W. Tilton was born in Beaver County, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 8, 1836. When a boy he came with his par- 
ents to Ripley County, Indiana, where he grew to man- 
hood. He attended Moores Hill College for two years and 
then became a surveyor of Ripley County. He later taught 
school in the same county and after his arrival at Catlin, 
Illinois, also engaged in the teaching profession. In 1868 
he became interested in the mercantile business at Catlin, 
and for almost half a century was numbered among the 
progressive merchants of Vermilion County. He also 
served as postmaster. Mr. Tilton was a Democrat, an ac- 
tive member of the Methodist Church, and belonged to Cat- 
lin Lodge No. 590, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was also identified 
with his brother in stores at Pilot and Palermo, Illinois, 
about 1883. On August 14, 1862, George W. Tilton was 
united in marriage with Miss Lizzie Albright, who was 
born in Clermont County, Ohio, January 30, 1837, the 
daughter of George and Paulina (Ammon) Albright. 
George Albright was born at Nuremberg, Bavaria, Ger- 
many, November 10, 1813, and his wife was born in Baden, 
Germany, April 12, 1817. He died January 5, 1892, and 




CHARLES VIRGIL TILTON 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 961 

his wife died July 10, 1897. Both are buried in Ripley 
County, Ind. Mr. Albright came to the United States in 
1833 and became a successful farmer. George W. Tilton 
died November 27, 1910, and his wife died October 18, 
1925. Both are buried in Oakridge Cemetery, Catlin, 111. 
Their children were: Charles Virgil, the subject of this 
sketch; Elsie Venus, born April 4, 1866, married Albert R. 
McGregor, lives at Danville ; and Bertie, married George R. 
Catlett, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this his- 
tory. 

The Tilton family traces its ancestry to England. Three 
brothers came from near Carlysle, Cumberland County, 
England, to the United States before the Revolutionary 
War, and settled in New Jersey. James Tilton removed to 
Fayette County, Pennsylvania, where he married Lizzie 
Pedan, and upon her death he later married Sarah Moore. 
They had two children, Enoch and John. Enoch Tilton was 
born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, December 25, 1780. 
He was married in 1802 to Betsey Wheatley, who was born 
March 11, 1784. They later removed to Beaver County, 
Pennsylvania, where Enoch Tilton became a farmer and 
preacher. They had thirteen children, as follows: James, 
born August 2, 1803; Mary Whittum, born September 21, 
1806; Sarah Tate, born June 6, 1808; Matthias, born Octo- 
ber 17, 1809; Rev. Enoch, born July 22, 1811, grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch; Joseph, born December 25, 
1812; John, born February 20, 1814; Rev. Charles, born 
November 21, 1815; Anna Van Camp, born July 19, 1817; 
Rev. Morgan, born May 28, 1819; Dr. Samuel, born April 
6, 1821 ; Elizabeth, born April 11, 1822; and Rev. Job, born 
July 16, 1825. 

Rev. Enoch Tilton, grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was born July 22, 1811. He was married on Sep- 
tember 12, 1832, to Elizabeth Wilson, who was born Jan- 
uary 12, 1811. They removed to Ripley County, Indiana, 
in 1844, and he became prominent as a Baptist minister 

27— Vol. 2 



962 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and farmer. He died November 12, 1883, and his wife died 
June 20, 1887. Both are buried in Ripley County, Indiana. 
Reverend and Mrs. Tilton were the parents of nine sons, as 
follows: John W., born August 15, 1834, died September 
11, 1834; George W., born January 8, 1836, died Novem- 
ber 27, 1910; William W., born October 10, 1837, died De- 
cember 23, 1888; Samuel R., born August 21, 1840, died 
January 28, 1911; Enoch B., born January 16, 1843; Rob- 
ert L., born April 12, 1845, died October 18, 1866; Andrew 
B., born February 25, 1847, died January 26, 1919; Joseph 
M., born May 8, 1849, died August 8, 1861 ; and James R., 
born July 8, 1853, died March 18, 1924. 

Charles Virgil Tilton grew up at Catlin and received 
his education in the public schools there. Throughout his 
business career he has been interested in the general mer- 
cantile business and for a time was employed in his father's 
store. In 1883 they purchased a bankrupt stock at Fair- 
mount, and assumed charge of its management. At the 
death of his father, Mr. Tilton assumed complete owner- 
ship of the business and has continued until the present 
time as one of the leading merchants of this section. 

On January 21, 1886, Mr. Tilton was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Jeannette L. Reese, born September 7, 
1864. She died September 22, 1928, and is buried in Green- 
view Cemetery, Fairmount. She was the daughter of 
Joseph and Virginia (Lawrence) Reese. Joseph Reese was 
born May 2, 1833, and died January 1, 1871. His wife was 
born May 16, 1835, and died September 22, 1925. To 
Charles Virgil and Jeannette L. (Reese) Tilton were born 
five children, as follows: Claude E., born November 16, 
1887, a graduate of the University of Illinois, was mar- 
ried October 21, 1922, to Eleanor Mabelle Breach, lives at 
Olney, Illinois, and they have a son, Timothy; Nina Vir- 
ginia, born June 11, 1890, married March 5, 1917, to Floyd 
E. Reese, assistant cashier of the Second National Bank, 
Danville, and they have a daughter, Virginia Jane; Julia 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 963 

Elizabeth, born September 2, 1897, married Ernest E. 
Cast, of Danville, and they have a daughter, Phyllis Jean- 
nette; Edith Ruth, born November 27, 1902, dietitian at 
the Oklahoma State Hospital, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; 
and Walter Joseph, born June 23, 1894, died October 23, 
1918. He was a graduate of the University of Illinois and 
was employed as a chemist by the Hercules Powder Com- 
pany. 

Charles V. Tilton is independent in politics. He is a 
member of the Baptist Church, and belongs to Fairmount 
Lodge No. 285, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 



Earl Gritten. — The Fithian Hardware Company, of 
which Mr. Gritten is president and treasurer, has long 
been recognized as one of the substantial business houses 
of Vermilion County. Mr. Gritten has ranked among the 
highly successful business men of Fithian for a number 
of years and is a member of one of the oldest families of 
this section. He was born in Pilot Township, May 4, 1884, 
the son of Thomas L. and Martha (Shank) Gritten. 

Thomas L. Gritten was born on a farm in Pilot Town- 
ship, the son of Labon E. Gritten, who came to Vermilion 
County during the early days and settled on a farm south- 
east of Penfield. The Gritten homestead was government 
land and was purchased at twenty-five cents per acre. 
Thomas L. Gritten became a substantial citizen of Bixby, 
where he owned and operated a blacksmith shop for many 
years. In 1890 he began the operation of a sawmill and 
thresher at Collison, Illinois, which he owned until 1904. 
He then rented a farm near Hope, Illinois, where he re- 
mained until the time of his death in 1906. His widow 
later married John Watson, and now lives near Danville, 
Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Gritten the following children 
were born: Earl, the subject of this sketch; Maude, mar- 



964 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ried Henry Baatz, lives at Bennington, Indiana; Ollie mar- 
ried William Pate, lives at Catlin, Illinois; Samuel, lives 
at Bismark, Illinois; Thomas A., lives at Danville; Myrtle, 
married Fay Wilson, lives in Chicago, Illinois ; and Orville, 
lives at Fithian. 

Earl Gritten received his education in the public schools 
of Bixby and Collison. He worked in his father's saw- 
mill and early in life became an expert in threshing work. 
He owned and operated threshers at Hope, Illinois, until 
1922, at which time he removed to Fithian. He had served 
as justice of the peace at Hope from 1912 until 1922 and 
as highway commissioner of Pilot Township for one term. 
On January 10, 1924, Mr. Gritten became associated with 
the Price-Plotner Hardware Company, Fithian, as man- 
ager. The business was later incorporated as the Fithian 
Hardware Company and Mr. Gritten became president and 
treasurer. His daughter, H. Lorraine Plotner, is vice 
president and bookkeeper. 

The Fithian Hardware Company are dealers in hard- 
ware, furniture, radios, plumbing and heating fixtures, 
and are also widely known dealers in farm implements. 
Duing the season of 1929, the firm sold twenty-one Mc- 
Cormick-Deering threshers, which represented a total of 
eleven carloads. Mr. Gritten was secretary and treasurer 
of the Illinois Brotherhood of Threshermen for five years. 
One of his responsibilities was the publication of "The Illi- 
nois Thresherman," a fine monthly paper devoted to their 
interests. The son of a thresherman, Mr. Gritten has 
operated engines and threshers for years; consequently 
his trade appreciates the sound, practical help, advice and 
service he is able to render through the Fithian Hardware 
Company, under which name he conducts a constantly 
growing business. 

In 1904 Mr. Gritten was united in marriage with Miss 
Minnie Vinson, of Newtown, Illinois, the daughter of 
William and Hulda (McHenry) Vinson. Mr. Vinson died 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 965 

May 27, 1925, and his wife died July 7, 1909. Both are 
buried at Emberry, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Gritten 
three children were born: (1) H. Lorraine, a graduate of 
Joliet Township High School, married in 1926 to Cleo Keith 
Plotner, lives at Fithian; (2) Vinson, a graduate of Oak- 
wood Township High School, married to Wintress Doug- 
las September 21, 1929, associated in business with his 
father; and (3) Mervin, a student at Oakwood Township 
High School. 

Mr. Gritten is a Republican and held the office of mayor 
of Fithian during 1925 and 1926. He is a member of the 
Methodist Church and is affiliated with Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Collison Lodge No. 713, Danville Con- 
sistory, and Modern Woodmen of America. 

"Gritten's Grit," a monthly publication, sponsored by 
Mr. Gritten, is a further example of his unceasing interest 
in the local merchant and farmer. 



William T. Snider, M. D. — Among the most prominent 
physicians and surgeons of Vermilion County is Doctor 
Snider, who is successfully engaged in practice at Oak- 
wood. He was born at Snider, Illinois, July 18, 1888, the 
son of G. B. and Martha Anne (Dodson) Snider. 

G. B. Snider, retired, is a well known resident of Oak- 
wood. He was born at Collison and for many years was 
one of the most successful farmers of Vermilion County. 
The town of Snider was named in honor of the Snider 
family and Mr. Snider served there as postmaster, as well 
as assessor of Blount Township. Since his retirement he 
has lived at Oakwood and is assessor of Oakwood Town- 
ship. Martha Anne (Dodson) Snider was born at Snider, 
Illinois, and died February 22, 1927. She is buried in 
Pleasant Grove Cemetery, near Oakwood. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Snider were born eight children, as follows: Ollie, 



966 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

married Ross Cork, lives near Danville; Vora E., lives 
near Oakwood; Stella, married Fred Oakwood, lives at 
Oakwood; Nell, married Verne Juvinal, lives near Col- 
lison; William T., the subject of this sketch; Glenn, lives 
near Collison; Lulu, married Stephen L. Ludwig, lives near 
Collison; and Tempa, married Lloyd D. Coake, lives at 
Danville. 

William T. Snider spent his boyhood on his father's 
farm near Oakwood. He attended Shellbark School and 
Brown's Business College, Danville. He spent several 
months in the office of the McArthur Brothers Construc- 
tion Company, at Indiana Harbor, Indiana, also, academic 
course in University of Louisville, and in September, 1906, 
entered the University of Louisville, from which he was 
graduated in 1910 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
He spent a year in practice at Potomac and came to Oak- 
wood September 1, 1911. He established offices on the site 
of the present State Bank Building, where he remained 
until 1918. He has since conducted his practice in a suite 
of offices connected with his home. Doctor Snider is 
surgeon for the United Electric Coal Company and Illinois 
Power and Light Corporation. He is identified with the 
Vermilion County Medical Society, Illinois State Medical 
Society, and American Medical Association. 

Doctor Snider was married December 30, 1906, at Dan- 
ville, to Miss Alice Fullington, of Collison, the daughter 
of Elijah and Addie May (Jones) Fullington, natives of 
Ohio and Illinois, respectively. They live at Oakwood. 
To Doctor and Mrs. Snider have been born three children: 
Wilma Bernice, born July 6, 1908, a graduate of Oakwood 
Township High School, attends the University of Illinois; 
Margaret May, born February 17, 1914, attends Oakwood 
Township High School; and William Fullington, born 
January 21, 1918, attends Oakwood school. 

In politics Doctor Snider is identified with the Repub- 
lican party. He is a member of the Methodist Church; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 967 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Oakwood Lodge, No. 
872; Danville Consistory; Peoria Shrine; Modern Wood- 
men of America; Walnut Hill Boat Club; and Rose Lawn 
Golf Club. 



James B. Payne, who is engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness at Potomac, Illinois, is a member of one of the earliest 
and best known families of Vermilion County. He was 
born in Danville, March 11, 1857, the son of John Payne, 
Jr., and Priscilla (Beasley) Payne. 

John Payne, Jr., was born in the State of New York 
and his wife was a native of Indiana. He was a small boy 
when his parents, John Payne, Sr., and wife, came to Illi- 
nois and settled on what is now the Vermilion County 
farm, which was later purchased by John Payne, Jr. 

John Payne, Jr., was twice married, his first wife being 
Verletta O'Neal. To them was born Wm. 0., Alonzo G., 
Permelia A., Abel W. (commonly known as "Wad") and 
Adderson C. Payne. After the death of his first wife he 
was married to Mrs. Priscilla Beasley, mother of Mary A. 
Beasley, and to this union was born James B., the subject 
of this sketch, and Carrie Harriet Payne. 

John Payne, Jr., died in 1863 and was buried in the 
cemetery which is located on the Vermilion County farm. 
His wife died in 1865 and was buried in Danville, leaving 
James B. and Carrie H. orphans at the age of eight and 
six years, respectively. About this time Alonzo G. Payne 
was honorably discharged from the Army and he and his 
good wife, Rhoda, took James B. and Carrie H. into their 
home and kept them until they established homes of their 
own. 

When President Lincoln issued a call for volunteers, 
at the beginning of the Civil War, Wm. 0., Alonzo G. and 
Abel W. Payne responded. During service in this war, 
illonzo G. was promoted to the rank of captain. Abel W., 



968 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

for sixteen months endured the hardships of prison life in 
Andersonville and Libby prisons. 

Carrie H., the full sister of James B., died in 1887; Wm. 
0. in 1888; Alonzo G. in 1907; Adderson C. in 1908 and 
Abel W. in 1927. Permelia A., widow of Joseph Malcom, 
lives in Iowa and Mary Beasley Smith, widow of William 
Smith, lives in Chandler, Oklahoma. 

James B. attended school for two terms at the Old Red 
Seminary in Danville, then attended the school in Catlin, 
Illinois, and later the school at Newtown, Illinois. 

In 1877 he was united in marriage to Miss Hettie 0. 
Warner, of Newtown, Illinois. Her father, John P. War- 
ner, was a native of Maryland and her mother, Sarah 
Ellen (Truax) Warner, a native of Ohio. To this union 
was born Lena V. Payne and a son (the son died in 
infancy). Lena V. was married to John Curtis Smith of 
Potomac, and to them one child was born, Louise Payne 
Smith, who was graduated from Potomac Grade and High 
Schools and from the Illinois Womans College of Jackson- 
ville, Illinois, and for the past three years has been super- 
visor of music in the Oblong, Illinois, High School. 

James B. Payne and wife commenced housekeeping in 
Catlin, where he operated the old Goins coal shaft until 
1884, when they moved to Potomac, where they still reside. 
When they first came to Potomac, he engaged in the gro- 
cery and restaurant business. In 1866 he was appointed 
postmaster under President Grover Cleveland and held 
that office for nearly four years. He then took up the 
insurance business and in 1903 Elmer Moreland, of Poto- 
mac, entered into partnership with him, under the firm 
name of Payne and Moreland, which firm still exists. Mr. 
Payne was for several years agent for the New York Life 
Insurance Company, but in 1906 changed to the Franklin 
Life Insurance Company, of Spring-field, Illinois, the firm 
of Payne and Moreland at that time taking a general 
agency with this company, and still holds that agency. The 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 969 

firm also holds the district agency for the farm depart- 
ment of the Fidelity-Phenix Insurance Company of New 
York and write for the Hartford Fire, the Fire Associa- 
tion of Philadelphia, the Home of New York and the Cen- 
tral Surety and Insurance Corporation of Kansas City, 
Missouri. 

Mr. Payne was a charter member of the Potomac Build- 
ing and Loan Association and was secretary of that cor- 
poration for nineteen years. He is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Odd Fellows 
Encampment. 

Mrs. Payne has been identified with the Womans Chris- 
tian Temperance Union for about forty years and is one of 
the leading workers in Vermilion County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Payne are active members of the Meth- 
odist Church of Potomac and are ardent supporters of all 
movements that are for the betterment of the community. 



Carl S. Williamson, M. D. — Standing high among the 
skilled professional men of Vermilion County, Doctor 
Williamson, of Fairmount, has honorably earned the posi- 
tion he occupies in his profession and community. He was 
born at Calhoun, Illinois, June 8, 1885, the son of Stephen 
A. and Martha (Walton) Williamson. 

Stephen A. Williamson was born in Ohio in 1840. For 
a number of years he operated brick plants at Mt. Carmel, 
Illinois. He served throughout the Civil War with an 
Indiana outfit and after his discharge from the service 
returned to the brick business. In 1874 he became inter- 
ested in farming. He died in May, 1919, and is buried at 
Calhoun, Illinois. His widow, a native of Illinois, lives at 
Calhoun. They had the following children : Charles, lives 
at Saint Louis, Missouri; Roland Ross, lives in Chicago; 
Minnie, married Obediah Barton, lives in Chicago; Mamie, 



970 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

married Calvin Reaser, lives at Calhoun, Illinois; Carl S., 
the subject of this sketch; and Clarence P., retired navy- 
officer, lives in Chicago, Illinois. 

Carl S. Williamson attended the public schools of Cal- 
houn. After completing his preliminary education he went 
to Chicago and finished his high school work, where he 
became an apprentice tool maker and die maker. He later 
studied mechanical engineering, but gave up this profes- 
sion to study medicine. He entered Valparaiso Univer- 
sity, from which he received the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1910. He served as interne at Frances E. Willard 
Hospital and Cook County Hospital. He spent two years 
in practice in Chicago as assistant instructor under Doctor 
Rubenwitz and Dr. Henry Schmitz. Doctor Williamson's 
next location was at Pipe City, Illinois, where he prac- 
ticed for almost two years. He then came to Fairmount 
in 1914, where he has since established an excellent prac- 
tice. He is a specialist in the treatment of chronic dis- 
eases and is recognized as an authority on Physico- 
Therapy. He is identified with the Vermilion County 
Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, and American College of Physico- 
Therapy. 

In 1908 Doctor Williamson married Miss Mary Elliot 
Thomson, of Ottawa, Canada, the daughter of William and 
Mary Thomson. He was born in England and for many 
years served as Postmaster General of Canada. He died 
in 1898 and his wife died in 1914. Several years after the 
death of his first wife Doctor Williamson was married to 
Miss Marie Tate of Chicago, the daughter of Allen and 
Mary (Williams) Tate, the former a native of Kentucky 
and the latter of Illinois. Mr. Tate lives at Villa Grove, 
Illinois. His wife died in 1921. To Doctor and Mrs. Wil- 
liamson a son was born, James Hunter, born January 16, 
1913. He attends Fairmount High School and has a pro- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 971 

spective appointment to attend the United States Naval 
Academy. 

Mrs. Williamson has the following brothers and sis- 
ters: Maude Lee, married Roland Ross Williamson, a 
brother of Doctor Williamson; Jeanette, married Daniel 
Jenson, lives at Billings, Montana; Daniel 0., lives at Bain- 
bridge, Indiana; Luella, married Otis Norman, lives at 
Danville; Elza Franklin, physician and surgeon, served 
throughout the World War, lives at Plainfield, Illinois; and 
Marie Williamson. 

Politically, Doctor Williamson is a Republican. He is 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, and belongs to 
Fairmount Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

During the World War Doctor Williamson enlisted for 
service and received the commission of first lieutenant, 
Medical Corps, under which commission he served. 

Doctor Williamson is interested in the raising of 
flowers and has one of the finest and most beautiful gar- 
dens in the city. He also enjoys fishing and hunting and 
spends much of his leisure time in the pursuit of those 
sports. 



R. O. Vinson. — One of the most successful farmers of 
Vermilion County is found in R. 0. Vinson, who is also 
president of the Peoples State Bank, of Collison. He was 
born in Pilot Township, Vermilion County, October 29, 
1889, the son of C. W. and Josephine (Davis) Vinson. 

C. W. Vinson, who lives retired at Oakwood, Illinois, 
is a native of Pilot Township, Vermilion County. He grew 
up on a farm near Collison and received his education in 
the district schools. He has always been extensively inter- 
ested in farming and stock raising. About 1913 he re- 
moved to Danville but eight years later located at Oak- 
wood, where he now lives. He is still numbered among 
the large land owners of this section. Mr. Vinson is a 



972 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Republican and a member of the Christian Church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Vinson are the parents of the following chil- 
dren: R. 0., the subject of this sketch; and Clarence H., 
farmer, lives on the old homestead. 

R. 0. Vinson attended the district schools of Pilot 
Township and also studied at Brown's Business College, 
Danville. He returned to his father's farm at the age of 
seventeen years and was given a quarter of a section of 
land to work. He carried on that project until three years 
later, at which time the elder Mr. Vinson removed to Dan- 
ville and at that time R. 0. Vinson took up his residence 
on the homestead. He managed four hundred acres of 
land and in addition purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres. In 1913 Mr. Vinson removed to Collison, where he 
now resides. He has maintained his interest in farming, 
however, and now is the owner of more than four hun- 
dred and fifty acres of the finest farm land in Vermilion 
County. He is widely known as a feeder of cattle and 
hogs and is an extensive shipper. Mr. Vinson was elected 
president of the Peoples State Bank, of Collison, in 1921. 

On November 19, 1913, Mr. Vinson was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Julia Osborn, of Collison, the daughter 
of J. T. and Nellie (Exton) Osborn. Mr. Osborn, who 
died in 1917, was a native of Collison and one of the most 
prominent men in this section. His wife died in 1914. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Vinson have been born three children: 
Charles Osborn, born October 27, 1914; Nellie Josephine, 
born March 13, 1917; and Theodore Kelley, born Novem- 
ber 11, 1918. All are students in the Collison public 
schools. 

Mr. Vinson is a member of the Christian Church and 
his wife holds membership in the Methodist Church. He 
is identified with Collison Lodge No. 714, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory; and Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is president of the Collison 
Masonic Association, president of the Emberry Cemetery 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 973 

Association, and has been a member of the Collison School 
Board for six years. He is now serving in his second year 
as superintendent of the Collison Methodist Episcopal Sun- 
day School. 

Mr. Vinson was the first young man in Collison to be 
called in the draft in 1917, but due to physical disability 
was honorably discharged. 



E. Dean Huber. — As junior member of the firm of J. W. 
Huber & Son, real estate brokers, E. Dean Huber is a well 
known figure in the business life of Danville, and he stands 
deservedly high in popular esteem. He was born at Cob- 
den, Union County, Illinois, June 28, 1896, the son of J. W. 
and Mabel M. (Dean) Huber. 

J. W. Huber was born at Belleville, Illinois, October 19, 
1872. He was an orphan at nine years of age and in early 
youth went to Anna, Illinois, to start life on his own 
resources. He identified himself with the shoe business 
until 1895 and then went to Belleville, where he conducted 
a retail store until 1903. After a year's residence at 
Champaign, Illinois, Mr. Huber came to Danville in 1904, 
where he has since successfully engaged in the real estate 
business, being one of the pioneer operators of Vermilion 
County. The offices of J. W. Huber & Son are located in 
the First National Bank Building. 

In 1895 J. W. Huber married Mabel M. Dean, who was 
born at Simco, Ontario, Canada, May 2, 1875. They have 
three children: E. Dean, the subject of this sketch; 
Beatrice R., lives at home; and Elizabeth M., married 
Charles Baum, lives in New York City. Mr. Huber is a 
Democrat, a member of the Presbyterian Church and Elks 
Club. 

E. Dean Huber was eight years of age when his parents 
located at Danville. He attended the public schools and 



974 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

following his graduation from Danville High School in 
1914 became associated with his father in the real estate 
business. He has been a member of the firm since 1916. 

On April 11, 1917, Mr. Huber was united in marriage 
with Miss Elsye M. Ernst, the daughter of Anton and 
Linna Ernst, natives of Germany, and early settlers of 
Danville. Mr. Ernst, who died in 1915, had lived in Dan- 
ville since 1879, where he engaged in the wholesale and 
retail meat business. 

Mr. Huber is a Republican, a member of the Presby- 
terian Church, and has the following club affiliations: 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332, Past 
Exalted Ruler 1925-26; Kiwanis Club, vice president 1922- 
1925-1928; Danville Rifle Club, president 1926-27-28; and 
Danville Chamber of Commerce, president in 1929. He 
served as president of the Danville Real Estate Board in 
1923-24, and president of the Danville Country Club in 
1928. He is also identified with the Illinois Real Estate 
Association and National Association of Real Estate 
Boards. 



Walter V. Dysert. — The professional career of Walter 
V. Dysert has extended over a period of twenty-eight 
years, during which he has brought to his calling splendid 
legal abilities and a regard for professional ethics that 
has served to gain him general confidence. From the out- 
set he has been numbered among the reliable and energetic 
lawyers of Danville, and on several occasions has been 
called upon by his fellow citizens to represent them in 
offices of trust and responsibility. 

Mr. Dysert was born in Oakwood Township, Vermilion 
County, May 31, 1881, the son of Joseph and Abigail (Vin- 
son) Dysert. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 975 

Joseph Dysert served throughout the Civil War as a 
member of Company C, One Hundred Twenty-fifth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry. He was born in Vermilion 
County and spent his entire life there. He became a suc- 
cessful raiser of pure bred stock. He died in 1926 at the 
age of ninety-four years. His wife is also deceased. They 
are buried in Pleasant Grove Cemetery, Oakwood Town- 
ship. Their children were: Naomi, married John W. 
Fowler, lives at Otterbein, Indiana; Samuel, deceased; 
John E., lives in Oakwood Township; Estella, married H. 
P. Kiger, lives on the old homestead in Oakwood Town- 
ship ; and Walter V., the subject of this sketch. Mr. Dysert 
was a Republican, a member of the Methodist Church, 
Masonic Lodge, and Grand Army of the Republic. 

Joseph Dysert was the son of Joseph Dysert, who was 
born in Ohio. Abigail (Vinson) Dysert was the daughter 
of Leven T. and Abigail Vinson, natives of Irving County, 
Kentucky. They were among the earliest settlers of Oak- 
wood Township. Mrs. Vinson lived to the age of one hun- 
dred and four years. 

Walter V. Dysert attended the public school of Oak- 
wood Township and following his graduation from Oak- 
wood High School in 1900, he studied law at Illinois Wes- 
leyan University, and was admitted to the bar in 1901, and 
was a member of the law firm of Buckingham & Dysert, 
at Danville, for a period of five years. He then practiced 
alone until 1910, at which time he removed to Los Angeles, 
California, where he remained until 1917. Upon his return 
to Danville he became a member of the firm of Graham & 
Dysert. Judge Graham died in 1925, but Mr. Dysert con- 
tinues the practice under the firm name of Graham & 
Dysert. He served as a member of the Illinois State Leg- 
islature in the Forty-fifth General Assembly. He holds 
the office of Master in Chancery of the Circuit Court of 
Vermilion County. 



976 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

In 1905 Mr. Dysert married Miss Mabelle Fox, the 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Fox, both deceased. 

Mr. Dysert is a Republican and a member of the Elks 
Lodge, Chamber of Commerce, and Danville Country Club. 
He is identified with the Vermilion County Bar Associa- 
tion, Illinois State Bar Association, and American Bar 
Association. 



John Szilagyi is one of the younger men who have 
achieved success in the business life of Westville as the pro- 
prietor of a large mercantile business. He was born in 
Hernad Csany, Austria-Hungary, January 11, 1897, the 
son of George and Mary (Wargo Gyurcso) Szilagyi. 

George Szilagyi was born in Austria-Hungary, where 
he was reared and educated. He came to the United States 
at the age of twenty-five years and settled at Westville, 
where he was employed in the coal mines for several years. 
He then became interested in the mercantile business at 
Westville and was thus engaged at the time of his death, 
April 23, 1913. His wife died in 1921. Both are buried at 
Georgetown, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Szilagyi were the par- 
ents of the following children : George, who died in infancy ; 
John, the subject of this sketch; Mary, married John Ko- 
vacs, lives at Westville; Kate, married Joseph Sebastian, 
lives in Chicago; Elizabeth, unmarried, lives in Chicago; 
George, lives at Westville ; Henry, lives at Westville ; Julia, 
who died at the age of five years ; Helen, attends Westville 
High School; and Stephan, died in infancy. 

John Szilagyi was six years of age when he came to this 
country with his parents. He was educated in the public 
schools of Westville and at an early age became identified 
with his father's grocery business. After the latter's death, 
Mr. Szilagyi made a trip to Europe with his mother, and 
upon his return to Westville in 1913 was employed by 
Austin Ellsworth. On May 1, 1916, Mr. Szilagyi estab- 




JOHN SZILAGYI 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 977 

lished his present business. He carries a complete line of 
groceries and meats, and also handles general merchan- 
dise. The company also deals in radios, electric washers, 
electric refrigerators, stoves, etc. A branch store is main- 
tained at Indionola, Illinois. 

On June 15, 1924, Mr. Szilagyi was married to Miss 
Catherine Takacs, of Westville. They have no children. 

. Mr. Szilagyi is a Republican, a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Danville. He is also a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Loyal 
Order of Moose. 



Benjamin Canady Richie is one of the active and most 
successful business men of Georgetown, where he is inter- 
ested in the real estate business. He was born at George- 
town, December 5, 1860, the son of James King and Sophia 
R. (Canady) Richie. 

James King Richie was born in Tennessee, October 24, 
1826. He became one of the leading merchants of George- 
town and met with great financial success in all his busi- 
ness undertakings. He was married May 31, 1854, to 
Sophia R. Canady, who was born at Georgetown, March 
7, 1834, the daughter of Benjamin and Ann (Haworth) 
Canady, who were among the first settlers of Georgetown, 
having come here when it was little more than a wilder- 
ness. James King Richie died December 10, 1891, and his 
wife died February 1, 1881. Both are buried at George- 
town. Their children were: John F., who died August 
28, 1856; Morris Edward, lives at Georgetown; Anna Cora, 
who died February 17, 1880; Benjamin Canady, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Mary Augusta, who died December 22, 
1891; Charles K., who died March 3, 1868; and Willie B., 
who died August 4, 1874. 

Benjamin Canady Richie grew up in Georgetown and 
attended the public schools. He later attended Earlham 

28— Vol. 2 



978 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

College and the University of Illinois. He began his busi- 
ness career in his father's store, but after his marriage 
went to Springfield, Illinois, where he established a grocery- 
business. In 1891 he returned to Georgetown, and he has 
since devoted his time to his real estate interests in this 
city. He lives with his family on the old Richie home- 
stead, which is among the historic landmarks of this sec- 
tion. Many interesting heirlooms of the Richie and Leav- 
erton families are to be found in this lovely old home, 
which carries on its tradition of hospitality. 

On October 27, 1886, Mr. Richie was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary Caroline Leaverton, of Chatham, 
Sangamon County, Illinois, born at Pocahontas, Bond 
County, Illinois, September 22, 1864, the daughter of Wil- 
son and Jeanette T. (Johnson) Leaverton. Wilson Leaver- 
ton was born at Indianapolis, Indiana, March 16, 1825. He 
moved with his father's family to Pocahontas, Bond 
County, Illinois. In 1849 he crossed the plains to Cali- 
fornia when only twenty-four years of age, with only a 
yoke of oxen and very little money and he as well as the 
entire party came near perishing for want of water. He 
remained in California for two years, and came back with 
three thousand dollars in gold nuggets in a belt strapped 
around him. He invested this gold in a farm at Pocahon- 
tas, Bond County, Illinois. In 1871 he moved with his fam- 
ily to Chatham, Illinois, where he purchased a farm of one 
thousand acres. He died September 16, 1895, and is buried 
in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Illinois. His wife, 
who died November 24, 1903, was a native of Pocahontas, 
Illinois, the daughter of Benjamin and Rebecca (Plant) 
Johnson. Her father was twice elected to the Illinois 
Legislature, once to the lower house, 1838 to 1840, and 
once to the Senate, from 1842 to 1846. To Benjamin Canady 
and Mary Caroline (Leaverton) Richie were born four 
children: (1) James King, born September 20, 1887, a 
graduate of the University of Illinois, now superintendent 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 979 

of the electrical department of George A. Spang & Com- 
pany Oil Well Supplies, Butler, Pennsylvania. He is a 
member of the Phi Delta Theta and Eta Kappa Nu fra- 
ternities, also a Mason and a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. He married Miss Lillian Brandon Spang, of But- 
ler, Pennsylvania, daughter of George A. and Laura Bran- 
don Spang. She died November 17, 1918. (2) Wilson 
Leaverton, born January 13, 1889, attended the University 
of Illinois and the University of Boulder, Colorado, now 
engaged in the electrical business, Georgetown. He is a 
member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, a Mason, and 
a member of the Methodist Church. He married Miss 
Emma Adelia Keenan, of Bloomington, Illinois, the daugh- 
ter of Rev. and Mrs. Wilbur E. Keenan. They have a 
son, Wilbur Benjamin Richie, born February 19, 1927. 
(3) Sadie May, born March 28, 1895, died November 27, 
1901. (4) Harold Benjamin, born December 11, 1902, a 
graduate of the University of Illinois in 1925 and the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, having received the degree of Mas- 
ter of Science from the latter institution, and taught school 
for one year at the University of Minnesota. He is now 
doing research work in Dairy Bacteriology and Butter 
Culture in the chemical laboratories for Swift & Com- 
pany, Chicago, Illinois. He married Miss Lucilla M. Mad- 
son, June 30, 1929, at Lanesboro, Minnesota. She is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Madson, and was gradu- 
ated from the University of Minnesota in 1929. They live 
in Chicago. He is a member of the Masonic order and the 
Methodist Church. 

Politically, Mr. Richie is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church, and belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias and Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mrs. Benjamin C. Richie takes an active interest in 
local club work. She was president of the Woman's For- 
eign Missionary Society for seventeen years, is a life and 
memorial member, and a member of the Eastern Star, 



980 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Women's Christian Temperance Union, and Home Mis- 
sionary Society, and was president of Danville District W. 
F. M. S. for three years. Her great great grandfather, 
Samuel Johnson, came from Scotland in 1750 and settled 
in North Carolina, where he became an extensive land 
owner. Through this ancestry, Mrs. Richie holds mem- 
bership in the Daughters of the Colonists. She also had 
four ancestors who served in the Revolutionary War, 
namely: Charles Johnson and Williamson Plant, who are 
buried at Pocahontas, Illinois; John Foster Leaverton, 
born in London, England, buried near Leesburg, Ohio; 
and William Buntain. Mrs. Richie is a member of Gov- 
ernor Bradford Chapter, Daughters of the American 
Revolution, of Danville, Illinois. Her father served in the 
Civil War as a member of Company F, One Hundred 
Thirty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and she holds 
membership in the Daughters of Veterans, Danville, Illi- 
nois, and Auxiliary Legion at Georgetown. 

Wilson Leaverton Richie served during the World War, 
having enlisted September 6, 1917, as a member of Com- 
pany D, Three hundred Thirteenth Engineers, Eighty- 
eighth Division, United States Army. He was sent to 
France August 13, 1918, and was discharged from the 
service on June 13, 1919. 



George A. Potter, M. D. — One of the representative citi- 
zens and substantial men of Danville is Doctor Potter, 
physician and surgeon, with offices in the Temple Build- 
ing. He was born on a farm near Danville, February 2, 
1876, the son of Elijah and Sarah E. (Hoskins) Potter. 

Elijah Potter was born on the old Potter homestead 
near Danville, September 28, 1848. He spent his entire 
life there and became one of the most successful farmers 
of Vermilion County. He died September 26, 1915, and 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 981 

his wife, born near Henning, Illinois, February 13, 1855, 
died December 18, 1893. Both are buried in Johnson 
Cemetery, near Danville. Mr. Potter was a Republican, 
and held the offices of tax collector and school treasurer. 
He held membership in the Christian Church and was a 
prominent citizen of the community in which he spent his 
entire life. To Mr. and Mrs. Potter were born three chil- 
dren: George A., the subject of this sketch; Daisy J., 
married Ulysses Grant Fairchild, lives at Urbana, Illinois ; 
and Jewell, farmer, lives on the old homestead near Dan- 
ville. 

George A. Potter spent his boyhood on his father's 
farm in Blount Township and attended the district schools 
He became a teacher in the local schools and in 1899 
entered what is now known as Washington University, 
Saint Louis, Missouri, where he took up the study of medi- 
cine. He received his degree as Doctor of Medicine in 
1903 and engaged in practice at Hope, Illinois, and later 
was located at Royal, Illinois. He came to Danville in 
November, 1919, where he has since built up an excellent 
practice. 

On April 6, 1904, Doctor Potter was united in mar- 
riage with Miss May B. McCoy, the daughter of John F. 
and Martha Jane (Gibbons) McCoy, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. McCoy, who lives retired at Danville, was a 
leading architect in the city for many years. His wife 
died in 1918 and is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Dan- 
ville. To Doctor and Mrs. Potter were born seven chil- 
dren, as follows : Rosalyn, born June 23, 1905, a graduate 
of Danville High School and Illinois State Normal Univer- 
sity, now a teacher in the high school at Melvin, Illinois; 
Janet, born December 31, 1906, a graduate of Danville 
High School, attends Illinois State Normal University; 
Theodore B., born February 26, 1909, attends Danville 
High School; George Fisher, born January 15, 1911, 
attends Danville High School ; Sarah May, born December 



982 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

8, 1912, attends Danville High School; Martha Ellen, born 
September 16, 1915, won the township scholarship in 1929; 
and Carolyn C, born May 2, 1923, attends the grade 
schools of Liberty District. 

Doctor Potter is identified with the Vermilion County 
Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, and Aesculapian Society. He is a 
member of the Christian Church, and is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of 
America, and Woodmen of the World. 

Doctor Potter is the owner of a fine farm of one hun- 
dred and eighty acres, which is located ten miles northwest 
of Danville. His home on North Vermilion Street is among 
the most attractive residences in the city and is located on 
a beautiful estate of five acres. 

Elijah Potter, great grandfather of Doctor Potter, was 
born in 1788. He fought throughout the War of 1812 and 
is buried in Johnson's Cemetery, northwest of Danville. 
His son, William Potter, helped in the building of the log 
cabin used as Republican headquarters during the cam- 
paign of President Benjamin Harrison. It was located on 
the present site of the Danville Chamber of Commerce. 



Herbert Ernest Hutton has been established in the 
general practice of law at Danville, Vermilion County, 
since 1904. He has offices in the First National Bank 
Building, and has built up a law business of such scope 
and importance as to denote him one of the representative 
members of the bar of Vermilion County. 

Mr. Hutton was born at Kentland, Indiana, May 9, 
1880, the son of Dr. J. H. and Phoebe Jane (Rawlings) 
Hutton. 

Dr. J. H. Hutton was born in Ohio. He spent a num- 
ber of years in Indiana and later lived at Hoopeston, Illi- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 983 

nois, where he engaged in the practice of his profession 
as a dentist from 1885 until 1903. He died in August, 1925, 
and is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Hoopeston. His 
widow, born in Johnson County, Indiana, lives at Hoopes- 
ton. Doctor and Mrs. Hutton had two sons: Herbert 
Ernest, the subject of this sketch; and Harry C, born 
October 6, 1882, lives at Danville. 

In the public schools of Hoopeston, including the high 
school, Herbert Hutton acquired his early education. He 
received his Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws de- 
grees at the University of Indiana, and in 1904 began the 
practice of law as assistant state's attorney under John 
M. Keeslar, state's attorney. In 1905 he was appointed 
by the Governor of Illinois as public administrator and 
public guardian of Vermilion County, which offices were 
held by him for six years. In 1910 Mr. Hutton formed a 
partnership at Danville with the Hon. S. Murray Clark, 
now circuit judge. The name of the firm was Clark & 
Hutton. This partnership continued until the election of 
Mr. Clark as circuit judge in June, 1927. On July 1, 1927, 
Mr. Hutton formed a partnership under the name of Hut- 
ton & Clark, with John E. Clark, of Georgetown, Illinois. 
This copartnership is still engaged in the general practice 
of law at Danville. 

August 21, 1909, Mr. Hutton married Myrtle A. Jack- 
son, of Danville, Illinois, the daughter of James Benjamin 
and Mary (Harris) Jackson, the former a native of Mar- 
tinsville, Indiana, and the latter of Springfield, Ohio. They 
are residents of Danville. To Mr. and Mrs. Hutton were 
born three children : Mary Jane, born February 16, 1911 ; 
Jackson Rawlings, born October 2, 1914; and Ernest, Jr., 
born November 8, 1918. 

Politically Mr. Hutton is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the First Presbyterian Church, Elks Club, Phi 
Delta Theta fraternity, Knights of Pythias, Kiwanis Club, 



984 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Sons of the Revolution of Illinois, Isaac Walton League, 
Danville Rifle Club, and Danville Country Club. 

Mr. Hutton is the president of the Danville Chamber 
of Commerce. In college he was president of his senior 
class. He has filled offices in various organizations in 
Danville, as follows: President of the Isaac Walton 
League; president of the Danville Rifle Club; president 
of the Danville Country Club; president of the Danville 
Kiwanis Club; chancellor Commander of the Damascus 
Knights of Pythias. 



Jesse Otis Faris, jeweler and optometrist, is promi- 
nently identified with the business life of Danville. He 
was born at Carrollton, Missouri, October 24, 1870, the 
son of Cary Campbell and Eliza (King) Faris. 

Cary Campbell Faris, deceased, was a veteran of the 
Civil War. He was born in Hillsboro County, Ohio, in 
1831. Throughout his life he engaged in general farming, 
and spent several years in Kansas, having gone there in 
1870. Upon his return to Ohio he engaged in farming 
until the time of his retirement. He died in 1909 and his 
wife, who was born in Ohio in 1837, died in 1926. Both 
are buried at Pricetown, Ohio. Mr. Faris served during 
the Civil War as a member of the Thirty-first Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry. He was a Republican, a member of the 
First Christian Church, and the Grand Army of the 
Republic. The following children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Faris: Benjamin Franklin, retired, lives at Spring- 
field, Ohio; Carey Clifton, jeweler and optometrist, lives 
at Marion, Indiana; Robert Lincoln, retired army officer, 
lives at Greenfield, Ohio; Jesse Otis, the subject of this 
sketch; Charles Foster, postmaster, lives at Hillsboro, 
Ohio; Addie, married Edward Sonner, lives at Walla 
Walla, Washington; Belle, deceased, was the wife of Ben- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 985 

jamin Knight; and Tessie, deceased, was the wife of 
Thomas Smith. 

Jesse Otis Faris attended the public schools of Price- 
town, Ohio, and The Hillsboro Academy. He later attended 
the Chicago School of Opthamology and in 1894 estab- 
lished an optical business in Wabash, Indiana. He dis- 
posed of this business there in 1900 and removed to 
Danville, Illinois, when he opened a jewelry and optical 
business at 51 North Vermilion Street. In 1912 Mr. Faris 
retired but four years later re-entered the business at the 
location which bears his name now at 131 East Main 
Street. In February, 1929, this business was reorganized 
and now operates under the name of Faris Company. 
Besides his extensive reputation in the jewelry business, 
he is widely known as an expert in his profession as an 
optometrist. 

In 1893 Mr. Faris married Miss Jennie Harreld, the 
daughter of William and Josephine Harreld. They have 
four children, as follows: (1) Carl V., born October 23, 
1894, a graduate of Bridgewater College and a registered 
optometrist. He married Bernice Hume and they have 
one son, J. 0. Faris, Jr., born March 28, 1916. (2) Beulah, 
born December 5, 1896, married L. P. Livengood, lives at 
Danville, Illinois. They have two children, Hilda Mae, 
born August 6, 1918, and Byron Nelson, born December 8, 
1922. (3) Nina, born May 30, 1902, married Joseph C. 
Payne. They have three children: Joseph Jr., born 
November 20, 1925; Patrica Louise, born August 11, 1928; 
and Rachel Ann, born December 25, 1929. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Payne are graduates of the University of Wisconsin. 
(4) Ralph Gordon, born February 19, 1906, a graduate of 
Missouri Military Academy. He married Lois Terry and 
lives in Danville, Illinois. Mr. Faris and his wife and all 
the family are associated in the various branches of 
Masonic orders. Mr. Faris, Carl V., and Ralph Gordon 
are affiliated with Olive Branch Ancient Free and Accepted 



986 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Masons, No. 38; Vermilion Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
No. 82; Danville Council, No. 37; Athlestan Comandery, 
Knights Templar, No. 45; Danville Consistory, thirty- 
second degree; Gao Grotto; Carl V. is a member of Ansar 
Temple; Elks Club; and Rotary Club. Mr. Payne and 
Mr. Livengood are both members of Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree. 

In politics Mr. Faris is identified with the Republican 
party. He holds membership in the Third Church of 
Christ, and is affiliated with the following Masonic bodies: 
Olive Branch Lodge No. 38; Vermilion Chapter No. 82, 
Royal Arch Masons; Danville Council No. 37; Athlestan 
Commandery, Knight Templar, No. 45; and Danville Con- 
sistory. 



John E. Clark holds rank as one of the most success- 
ful of the younger attorneys of Danville and Vermilion 
County. He was born at Georgetown, Illinois, July 4, 
1900, the son of Oliver P. and Ada (Elliott) Clark. 

John E. Clark attended the public schools of George- 
town, Illinois, and following his graduation from high 
school in 1917 attended Earlham College. He was gradu- 
ated from the University of Illinois in 1922 and from the 
Law School of the same university in 1925. Mr. Clark was 
admitted to practice at the bar of Illinois in February, 
1926, and located in Chicago with Victor B. Scott. The 
following year he came to Danville, where he has since 
been identified in practice with H. Ernest Hutton, under 
the firm name of Hutton & Clark. They have offices in 
the First National Bank Building. 

In 1926 Mr. Clark married Miss Gladys Castle, the 
daughter of John E. and Myra (Haworth) Castle, of Ver- 
milion County. Mr. Castle died in 1927 and his widow 
lives at Ridge Farm, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Clark a 
daughter, Mary Jo, was born December 9, 1927. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 987 

Mr. Clark is a Republican, a member of the Friends 
Church, Masonic lodge, Elks, the American Legion, Amer- 
ican Business Club, Phi Pi Phi and Phi Alpha Delta fra- 
ternities. He also belongs to the Collegiate Club of Chi- 
cago and the Chicago Bar Association. 



William J. Payne, deceased, was prominent in the city 
of Danville for many years. He was born in Vigo County, 
Indiana, April 10, 1855, the son of Allen F. and Mary Ann 
(Jewell) Payne. Both Allen F. Payne and his wife were 
natives of Indiana. They are deceased and buried near 
Brazil, Indiana 

William J. Payne grew up on his father's farm near 
Brazil and attended the district schools of Clay County. 
In early life he was a farmer. After coming to Danville 
Mr. Payne was identified with the Illinois Printing Com- 
pany, the Danville Daily News, and for eight years was 
secretary of the Illinois Free Employment Bureau. He 
was also extensively interested in Florida real estate. Mr. 
Payne served as assistant postmaster of Danville for a 
period of seventeen years. He died May 12, 1928. 

On August 19, 1879, Mr. Payne was united in marriage 
at Rockville, Indiana, with Miss Rachel Anne Oliver, of 
Turner, Indiana, the daughter of William and Sarah Ann 
(Fortner) Oliver, natives of England and Indiana, respect- 
ively. Both are deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Payne were 
born seven children, as follows: William Allen, manager 
of the Palm Beach Post, West Palm Beach, Florida; Ger- 
trude, teacher, Danville; Frank, salesman, Western Brick 
Company, Danville; Harry, general superintendent, Illi- 
nois Light and Power Company, Danville; George 0., 
identified with the Mid- West Brick Company, Ottawa, Illi- 
nois; Isabel, married Eugene Smart, Mansfield, Ohio; and 



988 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Joe C, identified with the Faris Jewelry Company, Dan- 
ville. 

Politically Mr. Payne was a Republican and he was a 
member of the Republican County Central Committee. He 
was a charter member of the Modern Woodmen. Mrs. 
Payne and the children were members of the Church of 
Christ. 



Hugh J. Marlatt. — Among the leading and highly suc- 
cessful business men of Danville is Hugh J. Marlatt, who 
is president of the Marlatt Battery & Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He was born in Warren County, Indiana, April 21, 
1885, the son of Edward Hale and Wilhelmina (Meredith) 
Marlatt. 

Edward Hale Marlatt, deceased, was a native of Indi- 
ana. He was born at Westpoint, in 1853, and spent his 
boyhood on a farm. He went to Attica, Indiana, in 1898, 
where he established a wholesale and retail feed business. 
He was thus engaged until the time of his death, March 13, 
1926. His wife, born in Warren County, Indiana, in 1856, 
died August 27, 1928. Both are buried at Attica, Indiana. 
The business which was established by Mr. Marlatt is now 
operated by his sons, Charles E. and John 0. Marlatt. 
Mr. Marlatt was a Democrat and a member of the Metho- 
dist Church. There were five children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Marlatt: Etta, deceased; Charles E. and John 0., 
who live at Attica, Indiana; James I., lives at Aberdeen, 
Washington; and Hugh J., the subject of this sketch. 

Hugh J. Marlatt was educated in the public schools of 
Warren County, Indiana, and attended Attica High School. 
When a young man he entered the employ of the Chicago 
& Eastern Illinois Railroad as round house clerk. In 1906 
he went with the Marrs-Tanner Electric Company, Dan- 
ville, as an electrical apprentice. He remained in that 
company's employ continuously until 1910, at which time 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 989 

he went to Chicago with the Automatic Telephone Com- 
pany for one year. He was later identified with the United 
Electric Construction Company. In 1912 he entered the 
employ of the city department, Chicago, as an electrical 
mechanic, but the following year was made supervising 
electrical engineer on the municipal piers. In the Spring 
of 1914 he was given the position of redesigning the elec- 
trical installation on the municipal pier, holding this posi- 
tion until 1916, when the pier was completed. The follow- 
ing year Mr. Marlatt was in charge of maintenance work 
on the pier. He went to Aberdeen, Washington, in 1917 
and was located with the Grays Harbor Shipyard as an 
electrical mechanic until November, 1918. He then was 
superintendent of Grays Harbor Railway & Light Com- 
pany until June, 1919, when he returned to Chicago. He 
re-entered the city's employ for one year and in September, 
1920, came to Danville, where he became interested in the 
manufacture of batteries at 19 North Walnut Street. In 
1921 the Marlatt Battery Manufacturing Company was 
organized by Hugh J., Charles E., and John 0. Marlatt. 
The business was begun in a small way and in October, 
1925, a modern factory building was built at 1112 Indus- 
trial Avenue. An addition was erected in 1927. The com- 
pany was incorporated in January, 1928, with the follow- 
ing officers : Hugh J. Marlatt, president ; John 0. Marlatt, 
vice president; and Charles E. Marlatt, secretary-treas- 
urer. 

In 1910 Mr. Marlatt was united in marriage with Miss 
Florence E. Jeffry, the daughter of Arthur 0. and Anna 
(Puff) Jeffry, the former a native of Rockford, Illinois, and 
the latter of Saint Louis, Missouri. He died in February, 
1925, and is buried at Charleston, Illinois. His widow lives 
at Danville. 

Mr. Marlatt is independent in politics. He is a member 
of Saint James Methodist Episcopal Church; Windsor 
Lodge, No. 836, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 



990 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Rotary Club; and Chamber of Commerce. He is also a 
member of the International Manufacturers Association 
and Illinois Manufacturers Association. 



I. N. Doughty, who is general superintendent of the 
Western Brick Company, is among the highly successful 
and widely known business men of Danville. He was born 
in this city, May 29, 1884, the son of James F. and Oceana 
(Morin) Doughty. 

James F. Doughty was born at Montpelier, Vermont, 
in 1856, and died in 1918. He is buried in Springhill Ceme- 
tery, Danville. He was reared at Montpelier, his parents 
having died when he was a young boy. He came to Dan- 
ville early in life and entered the employ of the Kelly Coal 
Company, with whom he was identified for many years, 
finally becoming general superintendent of their seven 
mines. He later was associated with the Hartshorn inter- 
ests in Ohio and also operated a mine for the Western 
Brick Company. Mr. Doughty was a Republican, and a 
member of Catlin Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. His widow, born at Danville, is still a resident of 
this city. Their children were: Edith, deceased; I. N., 
the subject of this sketch; and Russell, born in 1900, died 
in 1910. 

I. N. Doughty was educated in the public schools of 
Danville, in 1902 was graduated from Danville High 
School, and in 1906 from the University of Illinois. He 
then went to San Francisco, California, for a short time 
and upon his return to Danville, became connected with 
the Illinois Power & Light Company, in the engineering 
department. In 1907 he was put in charge of the work of 
building the street railway at Paris, Illinois, and during 
1908-1909 was city engineer for the city of Harrisburg, 
Illinois. In 1910 he went as construction engineer for the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 991 

Western Brick Company, in charge of the building of the 
company's plant. During 1910-1912 he was superintendent 
of No. 2 Plant; during 1913-1916 was superintendent of 
No. 1 Plant; and in 1917 was made general superintendent 
of the company. 

In 1917 Mr. Doughty married Miss Ethel Gerard, the 
daughter of John and Loretta Gerard, deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Doughty is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the First Presbyterian Church, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, No. 332, American Concrete Insti- 
tute, and American Ceramic Society. 



Leslie P. Livengood, who is agency manager for the 
Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company at Danville, is 
a native of this city, and one of the popular young business 
men of Vermilion County. He was born May 1, 1894, the 
son of Dr. J. A. and Flora (Parker) Livengood. 

Dr. J. A. Livengood, deceased, was a leading physician 
and surgeon of Danville. He was born at Wallace, Indi- 
ana, attended Butler College, and was graduated from 
Rush Medical College with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. He practiced in Chicago and Danville and for many 
years was surgeon for the Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad. 
He was affiliated with the Masonic Lodge. Doctor Liven- 
good died in February, 1896, and is buried at Wallace, 
Indiana. His widow, born at Hillsboro, Indiana, lives at 
Danville. The subject of this sketch, Leslie P., was the 
only child born to Doctor and Mrs. Livengood. 

Leslie P. Livengood secured his early education in the 
public schools of Danville and attended the University of 
Illinois. He has always been interested in the insurance 
business, having been first associated with the Equitable 
Life Insurance Company of Iowa as field supervisor. He 
resigned in 1920 and has since held his present position 



992 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

as agency manager at Danville for the Minnesota Mutual 
Insurance Company. He is a graduate of the Life Insur- 
ance Sales Research Bureau, Hartford, Connecticut. 
Offices are in the Baum Building. 

In 1916 Mr. Livengood married Miss Beulah F. Faris, 
the daughter of J. 0. Faris, of Danville, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this history. They have two children, 
Hilda Mae and Byron Nelson. 

In politics Mr. Livengood is identified with the Repub- 
lican party. He is a member of the Central Christian 
Church, Olive Branch Lodge, No. 38, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; Danville Country Club, Roselawn Country Club, 
Exchange Club, and Chamber of Commerce. He is also 
affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 332. 

Mr. Livengood enlisted as a private in 1910 in Battery 
A, First Illinois Field Artillery, and was later commissioned 
first lieutenant of the battery. He resigned in 1916. 



Major Russel Curtis Rottger, who is district commer- 
cial manager for the Illinois Bell Telephone Company at 
Danville, is a native of Illinois. He was born at Jackson- 
ville, May 16, 1891, the son of Curtis H. and Jessie Rottger. 

After completing his early education in the public 
schools of Jacksonville, Illinois, Russel Curtis Rottger was 
graduated from Springfield High School, and 1913 received 
the Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Illi- 
nois. Since that time he has been identified with telephone 
interests. He began as clerk to the commercial superin- 
tendent of the Central Union Telephone Company, and in 
1914 was promoted to state cashier for Illinois for the 
same company. The following year he was made chief 
clerk to the general manager with headquarters at Spring- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 993 

field, Illinois, and in 1916 was elected treasurer and gen- 
eral manager of the Vermilion County Telephone Com- 
pany. In 1918 he became president of the company and 
when it was sold to the Illinois Bell Telephone Company 
in 1928 Mr. Rottger was made district commercial man- 
ager. 

In his military affiliation Mr. Rottger is major in the 
Illinois National Guard, Thirty-third Division, and holds 
the rank of Major in the United States Army Reserve 
Corps. He is former president of the Rotary Club, and 
holds membership in the Danville Country Club, Elks Club, 
Roselawn Golf Club, Hamilton Club of Chicago, Masonic 
Lodge, thirty-second degree, and Chamber of Commerce. 

On November 21, 1914, Mr. Rottger married Florence 
Mildred Smith, at Oak Park, Illinois. They have a daugh- 
ter, Rosemary Jane. 



Oscar M. Bredehoft, deceased, was for many years a 
leader in the business life of Danville, where he was 
founder and president of the Bredehoft Dairy Company, 
617 North Vermilion Street. He was born in this city, 
June 28, 1879, the son of George and Julia (Eichelman) 
Bredehoft. 

Oscar M. Bredehoft was reared in Danville and early 
in his business career became identified with the bakery 
business. Previous to that he had been employed as a 
clerk for Peter Beyer, for many years one of the best 
known shoe dealers in Danville. He later went with Henry 
Bahl, shoe dealer, and then went on the road as a shoe 
salesman. Deciding to enter business for himself, he went 
to Gainesville, Florida, where he purchased a bakery. His 
next venture was the bakery on East Fairchild Street, Dan- 
ville, of Herman Manteufel. After conducting the busi- 
ness for a number of years he sold out to the present Inter- 

29— Vol. 2 



994 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

State Baking Company, and went into the dairy business. 
This was in 1919. The business grew rapidly and only a 
few years ago a new and modern plant was erected on 
North Vermilion Street, near the Big Four Railroad Sta- 
tion. Mr. Bredehoft died August 2, 1928, and is buried in 
Springhill Cemetery, Danville. 

Mr. Bredehoft is survived by his widow and five daugh- 
ters, the latter being as follows : Mrs. Frank Abbott, lives 
in Chicago; Dorothy, employed at the Bredehoft Dairy, 
Danville, Illinois; Virginia, Barbara, and Georgia, all liv- 
ing at home. A brother, Leo Bredehoft, of Bredehoft & 
Ball, wholesale grocers, also survives Mr. Bredehoft, as 
well as a sister, Miss Mabel Bredehoft. 

On June 18, 1899, Mr. Bredehoft married Miss Helen 
F. Griffin, who was born in Washington, Indiana, the 
daughter of Rev. James L. and Verna (Charley) Griffin, 
natives of Virginia and Indiana. The Reverend Griffin was 
a minister of the First Church of Christ in Danville, hav- 
ing come here in 1893 where he remained until his death 
in 1895. His widow resides with her daughter, Mrs. Brede- 
hoft. 

Mr. Bredehoft was a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He was a staunch Republican. 



Joseph S. Belton, who is secretary-treasurer and man- 
ager of the Bredehoft Dairy Company, is well and favor- 
ably known in Danville. He is a native of this city, born 
October 12, 1877. 

The boyhood of Mr. Belton was spent in Danville, and 
following his graduation from high school in 1891 he 
accepted a position as billing clerk with Webster Grocery 
Company, with whom he was identified continuously for 
thirty-three years. He was advanced from billing clerk to 
bookkeeper, and later served as road salesman for a period 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 995 

of twenty-five years. He became sales manager in 1920 
and became vice-president in 1922, and treasurer of the 
company in 1924. Mr. Belton resigned from the company's 
employ in December, 1928, and assumed the management 
of the Bredehoft Dairy Company on February 1, 1929. 

On July 12, 1906, Mr. Belton was united in marriage 
with Miss Grace Mater, of Danville. They have two chil- 
dren: Sara Elizabeth, who attends the University of Illi- 
nois; and William R., clerk, First National Bank, Danville. 



John A. Gannon is widely known in Danville, where 
he is a court reporter. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
October 25, 1893, the son of Edward and Margaret (Tur- 
ner) Gannon. 

Edward Gannon was born near Wilmot, Wisconsin, 
March 20, 1866, and his wife is a native of Spring Grove, 
Illinois. He grew up on his father's farm and in early life 
engaged in general farming. He went to Chicago in 1891, 
where he learned the carpenter trade, which he followed 
for some time. About 1899 he became a member of the 
Chicago police force, with which he has since been identi- 
fied as a member of the Lawndale Station. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics. Margaret (Turner) Gannon is the daugh- 
ter of George and Mary (Dorsey) Turner, natives of Scot- 
land and early settlers of Spring Grove, Illinois. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Gannon were born four children: John A., the 
subject of this sketch; Lawrence P., civil engineer, identi- 
fied with the Illinois Highway Department, lives at Paris, 
Illinois, is a World War veteran; Florence, a graduate of 
the University of Chicago, married Walter Peterson, lives 
in Chicago, Illinois; and Edward, Jr., a member of the fly- 
ing squadron, Chicago Police Department, is a World War 
veteran, having served in the United States Navy. 



996 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

John A. Gannon received his education in Chicago and 
is a graduate of Crane Technical High School and Barrett 
Institute, Chicago. After leaving school he was employed 
in the city offices as a stenographer and in 1912 was 
appointed secretary to the warden of the Illinois State 
Penitentiary at Chester, Illinois. He served in that 
capacity until October 5, 1917, at which time he enlisted 
in the army for service in the World War, as a member of 
the Nineteenth Infantry, attached to Fort Logan, Colo- 
rado. He was later stationed at Fort Houston, Texas, and 
also served on the Mexican border. He attended the Offi- 
cers' Training School at Camp Pike and was commissioned 
a second lieutenant. Mr. Gannon was discharged from the 
service on December 24, 1918. He then was attached to the 
United States Attorney's office as chief clerk in East Saint 
Louis, Illinois. Mr. Gannon came to Danville as a court 
reporter in October, 1927. 

In 1921 Mr. Gannon was united in marriage with Miss 
Kathryn Carr, the daughter of Harry and Edith (Young) 
Carr, of Saint Louis, Missouri. They have a daughter, 
Shirley Ann, born February 22, 1926. 

Politically, Mr. Gannon is a Republican. He is affiliated 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332, 
and belongs to the American Legion and "40 and 8 Society." 



The Vermilion Malleable Iron Company, of Hoopeston, 
is one of the five industries which are classified in the 
major division of those operating in this city. This busi- 
ness was first organized under the name of the Hoopeston 
Malleable Foundry Company, and was financed by local 
capital in the year 1907. At that time there was built a 
foundry building and an annealing plant. These two 
buildings yet remain and form the nucleus of the present 
plant. The original company failed at the time of the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 997 

panic of 1908 and the plant lay idle for some years, until 
it was purchased by the present owners. 

In the fall of 1912 the plant came to the notice of Chi- 
cago capitalists, who shortly thereafter purchased the 
property from the receivers of the previous bankrupt 
organization. At that time the plant had been laying idle 
for two years or more and consisted only of the two orig- 
inal buildings and the brick building which is still used by 
the present company as a general office. The present com- 
pany, known as the Vermilion Malleable Iron Company, 
was then incorporated and formed with Fred A. Poor, 
of Chicago, as president. The same organization still 
operates the foundry business, although the plant has more 
than doubled in the capacity of output during the past ten 
years. 

The productive capacity of the company has been 
increased from two thousand five hundred tons to its pres- 
ent output of five thousand to six thousand tons per year. 
During the last ten years the number of employes has been 
more than double over the number of persons employed 
by the original company. The pay roll of the company 
averages more than one thousand dollars per day. Many 
improvements have been made in the factory and plant as 
a whole. While these have not been of the revolutionary 
or sensational type, they have greatly added to the value 
of the property. 

The Vermilion Malleable Iron Company produces only 
a high-class malleable iron, known as "Certified Malleable 
Iron," that is to say, the malleable castings are certified as 
to quality, strength and elongation by the American Malle- 
able Castings Association, and the entire manufacturing- 
process is conducted under the inspection of the Associa- 
tion. Certified malleable iron is around fifty per cent 
stronger than the ordinary malleable product. It 
approaches very closely to steel and has supplanted to a 



998 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

great degree many parts formerly made from steel 
castings. 

The officials of the Vermilion Malleable Iron Company 
at present are as follows: F. A. Poor, president; P. W. 
Moore, vice president; F. C. Moore, operating vice presi- 
dent; H. C. Holloway, secretary; F. A. Preston, treasurer; 
R. W. J. Harris, general manager; C. L. Collier and W. L. 
Berkey, superintendents. 



Charles Milton Bruff, Jr. — One of the representative 
young business men of Hoopeston is Charles Milton Bruff, 
Jr., a veteran of the World War, who is president and 
treasurer of the Iliff-Bruff Chemical Company. He was 
born at Brooklyn, New York, August 8, 1889, the son of 
Charles Milton and Jessie (Johns) Bruff. 

A complete sketch of Charles Milton Bruff appears else- 
where in this history. 

Charles Milton Bruff, Jr., attended the public schools of 
Chicago, his family having located there when he was a 
very small child. He was graduated from Hyde Park 
(Illinois) High School in 1907 and began his business career 
with the Morden Frog & Crossings Works, Chicago 
Heights, Illinois, of which his father was superintendent. 
In 1916 Mr. Bruff came to Hoopeston and became asso- 
ciated with the Iliff-Bruff Chemical Company as a cost 
accountant and bookkeeper. He has since been interested 
in this concern with the exception of the period of time 
spent in service during the World War. At the time of the 
death in 1928 of Ellsworth Iliff, Mr. Bruff was elected 
president and treasurer of the company. 

Mr. Bruff enlisted for service in the World War, April 
3, 1918, and was sent to Fort H. G. Wright, Long Island, 
where he was attached to the heavy artillery. Later, he 
was assigned to Battery E, Sixty-eighth Heavy Artillery, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 999 

and served in France for eight months with that outfit. He 
was discharged from the service in March, 1919, at Camp 
Grant. 

In 1919 Mr. Bruff was united in marriage with Miss 
Minnie A. McCoy, the daughter of Nelson and Mary (Fin- 
ley) McCoy. Mr. McCoy, who died in 1917, was a native 
of Hoopeston and a leading citizen of this section of Illi- 
nois. He was treasurer of the Woodmen of America and 
in business life was identified with the Hoopeston Water 
Company. His wife is also deceased. 

Mr. Bruff is a Republican in politics, and holds mem- 
bership in Chicago Heights Lodge No. 851, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree; American Legion; Commercial Club; Chamber of 
Commerce; Isaac Walton League; and Hubbard Trail 
Country Club. 



Charles Milton Bruff, deceased, was a leader in the 
business life of Hoopeston for a number of years, where 
he was identified with the Iliff-Bruff Chemical Company. 
He was born in the Carolinas, November 15, 1861, and was 
a small boy when his parents removed to Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia. 

Mr. Bruff engaged in public work as time keeper on the 
construction of the great Croton aqueduct that supplies 
New York City with water. He came to Chicago in 1892 
and was connected with the Calumet Iron & Steel Com- 
pany of South Chicago. Later, he was superintendent of 
the Morden Frog & Crossing Works, and when the plant 
was moved to Chicago Heights in 1905 he went with them. 
In 1914 he became associated with Ellsworth E. Iliff and 
came to Hoopeston, where they established the Iliff-Bruff 
Chemical Company. Mr. Bruff served as vice president 



1000 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

and secretary of the company until his death, April 13, 
1919. 

On August 24, 1887, Mr. Bruff was united in marriage 
with Miss Jessie Johns, of New York City. They had the 
following children: Arthur Stanley, deceased; Pearl B., 
married Robert E. Palmquist, lives in Chicago Heights, 
Illinois; Charles Milton, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this history; May Charlotte, married Rufus C. 
Orr, lives in Chicago Heights, Illinois; and Winifred B., 
married Edwin Rennebohm, lives at Madison, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Bruff was a member of the Masonic and Elk Lodges, 
Knights of Pythias, Industrial Club of Chicago Heights, 
and Commercial Club. He was a liberal and generous man, 
prominent and respected in his community. 



Emory Herbert Richcreek is a well known and excellent 
citizen of Hoopeston, where he is engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business at 108 North Market Street. He 
was born at Strawn, Livingston County, Illinois, Septem- 
ber 5, 1875, the son of Jerd Coon and Minnie (Wilhelm) 
Richcreek. 

Jerd Coon Richcreek was born in Coshocton, Ohio, in 
1845. He was well educated and for a number of years 
was a teacher in the schools of Ohio and Illinois. Later he 
became superintendent of the Sullivan Farm in Livingston 
County, which is now known as the Hiram Sibley Farm. 
After six years Mr. Richcreek removed to Strawn, Illinois, 
where he was the owner of a grain elevator and implement 
business. He also was a lumber dealer. In 1880 he sold 
his interests and removed to Montana, Kansas, where he 
farmed successfully until 1893. In that year he was elected 
probate judge of Labette County, Kansas, and served for 
two years. He became the owner of six hundred acres of 
land and in 1895 purchased a lumber yard at Oswego, Kan- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1001 

sas. He was appointed postmaster there and served under 
President Roosevelt's administration. He then entered the 
hardware and implement business in Oswego and was thus 
engaged at the time of his retirement in 1917. At the time 
of his death, January 1, 1929, Mr. Richcreek was the owner 
of valuable parcels of land in Oswego, Kansas, and had 
over five hundred acres of fine farm land. He was a 
Republican. Minnie (Wilhelm) Richcreek was born in 
Germany in 1856 and came to this country with her broth- 
ers and sisters in 1873. She lives at Oswego. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Richcreek were: Emory Herbert, 
the subject of this sketch; Alice, married B. W. Reed, lives 
at Wichita, Kansas; Genevieve, married Carl Belt, lives 
at Coffey ville, Kansas; Tecumseh, lives at Wichita, Kansas; 
and Orville Kenneth, World War veteran, lives in Kansas 
City, Missouri, where he is the owner of the Franklin 
Hotel. 

Emory Herbert Richcreek received his education in the 
public schools of Labette County, Kansas, having attended 
Pleasant Valley School No. 48. He was five years old when 
his family removed from Strawn, Illinois, to Kansas. In 
1893 Mr. Richcreek assumed charge of his father's farm 
of six hundred and forty acres, which he operated until 
1897, at that time removing to Oswego, Kansas. He then 
established a feed, flour and seed business, known as the 
Richcreek Flour, Feed and Seed Store. After a year Mr. 
Richcreek sold the business and was identified with his 
father's lumber interests until 1901. He came to Hoopes- 
ton in 1902 and the following year purchased a grocery 
store. After six months he entered the employ of the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad for a short time, soon 
after which he again entered the grocery business. In 1913 
he purchased the J. E. Watson Grocery Company, 202 
North Market Street, which he continued to operate suc- 
cessfully for twelve years. This store was subsequently 
traded for a farm of one hundred and sixty acres near 



1002 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Hoopeston. Since 1923 Mr. Richcreek has been interested 
in the real estate and insurance business. He purchased 
a section of the Mann Block in 1920, which he still owns. 
He also is the owner of extensive other real estate parcels 
in Hoopeston. In his insurance business he represents the 
following companies: Northwestern Fire Insurance Com- 
pany; Rhode Island Insurance Company; National Union 
Insurance Company; Great Lakes Insurance Company; 
American Automobile Association; and North River Fire 
Insurance Company. 

On September 9, 1896, Mr. Richcreek was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lulu Powell, the daughter of 0. W. and 
Elizabeth Powell, natives of Ohio, and now residents of 
Washington Court House, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Richcreek 
have a daughter, Thelma, a graduate of Hoopeston High 
School. She lives at home. 

Politically, Mr. Richcreek is a Republican and he has 
always taken an active part in local politics. He is a mem- 
ber of Independent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 496; Modern 
Woodmen of America, No. 257; Loyal Order of Moose, 
No. 1227; and Farm Bureau. His wife is a member of the 
Presbyterian Church of Hoopeston. 



D. Arthur Thomas, a veteran of the World War is num- 
bered among the progressive young business men of Catlin, 
Illinois, where he is identified with the Catlin Motor Com- 
pany. He was born here, May 13, 1896, the son of David 
and Elizabeth (Engelman) Thomas. 

David Thomas, his father, was a successful farmer and 
stockman of Catlin Township, and a native of Illinois. He 
was born at Tilton, Illinois, and died at his home near Cat- 
lin, Illinois, August 10, 1929. He owned and operated one 
hundred and eighty acres of well improved land near Cat- 
lin. Mr. Thomas was a Republican, a member of the Meth- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1003 

odist Church, and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas had the following children : Ethel, mar- 
ried J. T. Dickinson, lives at Seattle, Washington; Helen, 
at home; D. Arthur, the subject of this sketch; Herman, 
Hazel, Cedelia, and an infant, all four deceased. 

D. Arthur Thomas grew up at Catlin and following his 
schooling he entered Brown's Business College. At the 
outbreak of the World War he enlisted in the service of 
Infantry Company I, Camp Jackson, Columbia, South Car- 
olina, later transferred as sergeant to the Division Head- 
quarters, Twentieth Division, at Greenville, North Caro- 
lina. After several months he was then transferred to 
Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky, where he was dis- 
charged in February, 1919. Upon his return to Catlin, Illi- 
nois, he became interested in the automobile business and 
sold Ford cars for DeLong Motor Company, Fithian, Illi- 
nois, and Barker Motor Company, Danville, Illinois. In 
December, 1920, he went to Los Angeles, California, where 
he continued to sell Ford automobiles. Upon his return to 
Catlin, he became identified with the Catlin Motor Com- 
pany and in 1923 purchased a half interest in the business. 
He became sole owner of the concern in 1926. The Catlin 
Motor Company, dealers in this territory for the Ford 
Motor Company, have an up-to-date and well-equipped 
garage and render expert service. 

On February 2, 1923, Mr. Thomas was married to Miss 
Pauline Jones, born August 30, 1899, and the oldest child 
of William and Ona (McDonald) Jones, of Catlin, Illinois. 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Thomas have two children, Kathleen 
Jane, born May 23, 1925, and Robert William, born April 5, 
1928. 

Mr. Thomas is a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, American Legion, Catlin Lodge, No. 285, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and Danville Consistory, thir- 
ty-second degree. 



1004 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Maude Mae Palmer has for almost twenty years been 
the capable and well known postmaster of East Lynn. She 
was born on a farm in McLean County, Illinois, the daugh- 
ter of Thomas A. and Lucetta 0. (Halfhill) Palmer. 

Thomas A. Palmer was among the first settlers of 
McLean County, Illinois. He was born in Ohio, the son 
of John and Rachel (Steadman) Palmer, both of whom 
were natives of Virginia, but later removing to Ohio, from 
whence they later emigrated, in a covered wagon, to Illi- 
nois, when their son, Thomas A. was fifteen years of age; 
they settled in McLean County, removing to East Lynn, 
Vermilion County, in the early nineties. John Palmer died 
at the age of seventy-six, and his wife at the age of sev- 
enty-seven years; both are buried at East Lynn. Their 
son, Thomas A., followed farming until he moved to East 
Lynn, the same year as his parents, when he engaged in 
the transfer business. From 1910 till his death in 1916, 
Mr. Palmer was assistant postmaster at East Lynn. He 
was also greatly interested in the poultry business, and 
was building up a flock of pure bred White Rocks at the 
time of his death. In politics, Mr. Palmer was a Democrat, 
although he cast his first vote for Abe Lincoln, in 1864; 
his last vote was cast for Woodrow Wilson, in 1912. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Palmer were Maude 
Mae, the subject of this sketch, and Clarence E., who was 
married to Miss Georgia Hardy, in South Bend, Indiana, 
where they have since resided; their children are Richard 
Lynn, Delbert, Chester, Ethel Mae, and Thelma. When 
Miss Palmer was three and one-half years of age, she lost 
her mother through death, and grew up in the home of her 
grandfather Palmer. 

Maude Mae Palmer received her education in the public 
schools of East Lynn, and following her graduation, she 
was employed as a clerk in the general store owned by E. 
C. Kelley, in East Lynn. In 1910, she was appointed post- 
master, as the result of a civil service examination, in 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1005 

which she stood first in a group of four contestants. She 
has served through the Wilson, Harding, Coolidge and 
Hoover administrations. She also conducts a small shop in 
connection with her administrative work. Since 1919, she 
has served as state secretary of the Illinois Branch of the 
National League of District Postmasters of the United 
States, and has represented the Illinois Branch as a dele- 
gate to the following national conventions: Detroit, Min- 
neapolis, Washington, District of Columbia, Chattanooga, 
Chicago, Cleveland, Louisville, Omaha and Niagara Falls. 
Miss Palmer is a member of the Methodist Church and 
for more than twenty years has been the teacher of the 
Triangle Class of the East Lynn Methodist Episcopal Sun- 
day School. 



T. W. Willingham. — One of the most influential figures 
in educational circles in Illinois is T. W. Willingham, who is 
president of Olivet College. He was born at Sebree, Ken- 
tucky, January 20, 1893, the son of John A. and Ella 
(Timmons) Willingham. 

John A. Willingham was born at Louisville, Kentucky. 
His father was an officer in the Civil War and was a mem- 
ber of the Kentucky State Legislature for many years. 
John A. Willingham spent his early life as a merchant 
and in 1893 became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South. He served as pastor of the Church of the 
Nazarene from 1910 until 1917. He died May 21, 1917, 
and is buried at Vermilion Grove, Illinois. His widow lives 
at Olivet, Illinois. She was born at Hanson, Kentucky. 
Her family received a tract of land, the deed to which was 
given for services in the Revolutionary War, and which 
was signed by George Washington. To John A. and Ella 
(Timmons) Willingham the following children were born: 
Maud, died in infancy; Mrs. Mabel Flowers, lives at Har- 



1006 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

per, Kansas; Mrs. Lorine Walker, lives at Belle Plaine, 
Kansas; T. W., the subject of this sketch; Flora, lives at 
Olivet; Ruth, lives at Lexington, Kentucky; Mrs. Kathleen 
A. Richards, lives at Georgetown, Illinois; and John A. 
Jr., lives at Olivet. 

T. W. Willingham spent his boyhood in Kentucky and 
was educated in Ruskin Cave College, Tennessee, and 
Olivet College. He also studied in the McCormick Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Chicago, and served as a minister of Naza- 
rene Church from 1915 until 1922. He then became treas- 
urer of Olivet College and served in that capacity from 
1922 until 1926, at which time he was appointed president 
of the college. 

On October 21, 1915, Mr. Willingham married Miss 
Mary Cusick, of Courtland, Michigan, the daughter of 
Rev. Charles A. and Loretta (Davenport) Cusick. He died 
April 26, 1921, and his wife died March 7, 1929. They were 
natives of Michigan. To Mr. and Mrs. Willingham were 
born three children: Miriam Irene, T. W., Jr., and Charles, 
all students. 

Mr. Willingham is a Republican and a member of the 
Church of the Nazarene. 



Clay Cooke is among the best known business men of 
Ridge Farm, where he is interested in general insurance. 
He was born here, July 21, 1888, the son of Joseph F. and 
Druzilla P. (Campbell) Cooke. 

Joseph F. Cooke was born in Vermillion County, Indi- 
ana, and his wife was born at Georgetown, Illinois. Mr. 
Cooke engaged in general farming throughout his life. 
He operated two hundred and forty acres of land, which 
was part of the original Cooke homestead. Mr. Cooke was 
a Democrat and a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
He died in 1907 and is buried at Bethel, Illinois. His widow 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1007 

lives at Ridge Farm. To Mr. and Mrs. Cooke eight chil- 
dren were born: Nettie, married Arthur Jones, lives at 
Ridge Farm; Roy F., lives at Indianapolis, Indiana; Mae 
D., the widow of A. B. Hughes, lives at Detroit, Michigan; 
Clay, the subject of this sketch; Harley D., lives at Indian- 
apolis, Indiana; Blanche, married Claude Maffett, lives at 
Georgetown, Illinois; Lura, married John Sheppard, lives 
at Eugene, Indiana; and Glenn L., lives at Detroit, Mich- 
igan. 

Clay Cooke was educated in the public schools of Bethel 
and Ridgefarm, Illinois. He has spent his entire life in 
this section and until 1921 ranked high among the farmers 
of the county. He came to Ridge Farm in 1922 and was 
associated with the Northwestern Coal Company for a 
time, later with the United States Fuel Company, and in 
October, 1924, he purchased the insurance business of 
Hiberly & McMahon. Mr. Cooke represents the following 
companies: Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance 
Company, Ltd.; Hartford Fire Insurance Company; Con- 
necticut Fire Insurance Company ; Reliance Fire Insurance 
Company; Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Company; 
Minneapolis Fire & Marine Insurance Company; National 
Fire Insurance Company; Fidelity Phoenix Fire Insurance 
Company; Sun Fire Insurance Company; North British & 
Mercantile Fire Insurance Company; American Casualty 
Company; Western Automobile Casualty Company; Hart- 
ford Accident Indemnity Insurance Company; Ocean Acci- 
dent & Guarantee Insurance Company; Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

In 1907 Mr. Cooke married Miss Gertrude Pierce, the 
daughter of Win and Lelah Pierce, natives of Champaign 
County, Illinois, now residents of Los Angeles, California. 
Mrs. Cooke died December 19, 1916, and is buried at Ridge 
Farm. To this union two children were born, Louise and 
J. Frank. Mr. Cooke was married the second time in 1922 
to Miss Grace Boston, the daughter of Thomas and Amer- 



1008 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ica (Hildreth) Boston, the former a native of Virginia and 
the latter of Illinois. Mr. Boston, a Civil War veteran, 
died February 22, 1928. His wife died in 1901. To Clay 
and Grace (Boston) Cooke have been born two children, 
Jack and Gretchen. 



C. S, Montooth. — Prominent in educational affairs in 
Vermilion County is C. S. Montooth, who is superintendent 
of schools at Allerton. He was born at Toulon, Illinois, 
February 25, 1879, the son of James and Mary E. (Wilson) 
Montooth. 

James Montooth was born in Ireland. He was a small 
child when his parents came to this country and settled 
in Illinois. He served throughout the Civil War as a mem- 
ber of the Nineteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was 
discharged with the rank of first lieutenant. He later 
served as sheriff of Stark County for four years. Mr. Mon- 
tooth died in 1922 and his wife died in 1911. Both are 
buried at Elmira, Illinois. They were the parents of the 
following children: Mrs. Delia Rennick, lives at Toulon, 
Illinois; Mary L., and Edith S., both deceased; Mrs. Laura 
Milnes, lives at Neponset, Illinois; Dr. J. L., lives at Morris, 
Illinois; S. W., lives at Toulon, Illinois; and C. S., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

C. S. Montooth attended Toulon (Illinois) Academy and 
received the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Science from the University of Illinois. He has served 
as principal or superintendent for the past twenty-one 
years, including four years at Chrisman, Illinois, and five 
years at Allerton, Illinois. 

On July 29, 1906, Mr. Montooth married Miss Alice W. 
Logan (Bachelor of Science, University of Illinois), of 
Edinburg, Illinois, the daughter of David and Martha E. 
(Sprinkle) Logan, natives of Illinois. Mr. Logan died at 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1009 

Edinburg, Illinois, in 1925. His widow lives in Miami, 
Florida. Mr. and Mrs. Montooth have two daughters: 
Hazel Evelyn, a junior at the University of Illinois; and 
Martha Grace, who attends school at Allerton. 

Mr. Montooth is a Republican, a member of the Metho- 
dist Church, and belongs to the Masonic Lodge, Eastern 
Star, and Modern Woodmen of America. 



Joseph Gurney Cannon, nationally and locally known 
as "Uncle Joe" Cannon, was born at New Garden, North 
Carolina, May 7, 1836, and died November 12, 1926. His 
father, Dr. Horace Franklin Cannon, who was drowned 
in 1851, was one of the founders of Guilford College, North 
Carolina; his mother was Gulielma Hollingsworth. His 
grandfather, Samuel Cannon, of Hugenot descent, was a 
native of Ireland, migrating thence to New England and 
from there to North Carolina. 

While Joseph was still a child, the family removed to 
what is now Annapolis, Indiana, where the boy became a 
clerk in a country store. He studied law under John P. 
Usher and at the Cincinnati Law School, and in 1858 began 
practice at Shelbyville, Illinois, removing soon after to 
Tuscola and later to Danville, where he made his home for 
the rest of his life. 

In January, 1862, he was married to Mary P. Reed, of 
Canfield, Ohio. From 1861 to 1868 he was state's attorney 
for the Twenty-seventh Judicial District. Defeated as a 
Republican candidate for Congress in 1870, he was elected 
to the Forty-third Congress (1873-75), and held his seat 
until the end of the Fifty-first Congress (1889-91.) At the 
opening of the Fifty-first Congress (1889-91) he was an 
unsuccessful candidate for speaker, but Reed, who was 
elected, made him his "lieutenant in parliamentary pro- 
cedure" and he took an important part in the discussions 

30— Vol. 2 



1010 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

which led, on January 29, 1890, to Reed's action in counting 
a quorum. He was elected to the Fifty-third Congress 
(1893-95) and sat in the House until the close of the Sixty- 
second Congress (March 3, 1913). At the opening of the 
Fifty-seventh Congress (1901-03) he was elected speaker 
and retained that office until the end of the Congress, 
March 3, 1911. 

In 1904, while speaker, he was made permanent chair- 
man of the Republican National Convention at Chicago, 
and in the convention of 1908, at the same place, received 
fifty-eight votes for president on the first ballot, all but 
eleven of the votes being from Illinois. He was defeated 
for re-election to the Sixty-third Congress (1913-15), but 
regained his seat in the Sixty-fourth Congress (1915-17), 
and continued a member of the House until the close of the 
Sixty-seventh Congress, March 3, 1923, when he retired. 



Ted Henderson. — Numbered among the most popular 
young men of Vermilion County is Ted Henderson, a vet- 
eran of the World War, who is serving as postmaster of 
Ridge Farm. He was born here, July 16, 1895, the son 
of William and Sarah (Thompson) Henderson. 

William Henderson, mayor of Ridge Farm, is a highly 
esteemed citizen of the county. He was born at "Yankee 
Point," near Ridge Farm, and his wife is also a native of 
the same place. Mr. Henderson spent many years as a 
farmer and in 1901 came to Ridge Farm, where he was 
one of the organizers of the Vermilion County Telephone 
Company. He also was interested in real estate and insur- 
ance. Besides holding the office of mayor, Mr. Henderson 
is commissioner of highways. He is a Republican, a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, Ridge Farm Lodge No. 
632, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and Modern 
Woodmen of America. To Mr. and Mrs. Henderson the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1011 

following children were born: Mayme, married D. D. 
Stanfield, lives at Edgar, Illinois; Everett, deceased; Hugh; 
Floy, married Donald L. Cowan, lives in New York City; 
William McKinley, lives at Ridge Farm; Ted, the subject 
of this sketch; Leah, deceased; Freida, married Walter 
Bruce Tucker, lives at Chrisman, Illinois; and James War- 
ren, lives in New York City. 

Ted Henderson received his early schooling at Ridge 
Farm, and after his graduation from high school in 1913 
he entered the University of Illinois. He enlisted for 
service during the World War and was sent to Kansas 
City, Missouri, later to Mississippi, where he was attached 
to Battery F, One Hundred Thirty-ninth Field Artillery, 
Thirty-eight Division. He served in France with that out- 
fit and was discharged in February, 1919. Upon his return 
to Ridge Farm, Mr. Henderson became interested in the 
automobile business as a mechanic. He was appointed 
postmaster of this place in 1923 and has filled the office 
with utmost ability and efficiency. 

Mr. Henderson was married (first) in 1918 to Miss Har- 
riet B. Hester, the daughter of Cyrus and Georgia (Foster) 
Hester. Mr. Hester is a retired grain dealer and lives at 
Ridge Farm. His wife is a native of Virginia. Mrs. Hen- 
derson died in 1922 and is buried at Ridge Farm. Mr. 
Henderson was married (second) on July 14, 1928, to Miss 
Susie Mae Satterlee, the daughter of William and Cora 
(Peer) Satterlee, residents of Dana, Indiana. 

Mr. Henderson is a Republican, a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church and has the following lodge affiliations: 
Ridge Farm Lodge, No. 632, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Gao 
Grotto; Knights of Pythias; Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica; and American Legion, Past Commander of U. C. 
Fletcher Post, No. 334. He also belongs to the Illinois 
Postmasters Association, and the American Postmasters 
Association. 



1012 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Wilfred J. Goreham, who is principal of Sidell Town- 
ship High School, is numbered among the widely known 
and well liked young men of Vermilion County. He was 
born in Chicago, Illinois, December 26, 1896, the son of 
John H. and Elizabeth (Smith) Goreham. 

John H. Goreham was born in Norwich, England. He 
was nineteen years old when he came to this country and 
settled in Chicago, where he entered the employ of the 
Pullman Company. He was a tinner by trade and 
remained in the employ of the Pullman Company for a 
period of thirty-six years. Mr. Goreham died in 1920 
and is buried in Mount Greenwood Cemetery, Chicago. 
He was a Republican and a member of the Methodist 
Church and Royal League. Elizabeth (Smith) Goreham, 
also born in England, lives in Chicago. There were five 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Goreham, as follows: Mil- 
dred, married James W. Duncan, lives in Chicago ; Wilfred 
J., the subject of this sketch; Gertrude, married Eston H. 
Ellis, lives in Chicago; Winifred, married David W. Orr, 
lives at River Forest, Illinois; and John H., lives in Chicago. 

Wilfred J. Goreham attended the public schools of 
Chicago. He was graduated from Illinois Wesleyan Acad- 
emy in 1920 and from Illinois Wesleyan University in 1924 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Mr. Goreham was 
also interested in church work and during his college 
career was a preacher in the Methodist churches at Sellers- 
burg, Indiana, Covell, and Kenney, Illinois. He began his 
teaching career in 1924 as principal of Armstrong (Illinois) 
High School and three years later accepted his present 
position as principal of Sidell Township High School. 

In 1924 Mr. Goreham was united in marriage with Miss 
Alta Lois Bailey, the daughter of R. F. and Minnie (Bent- 
ley) Bailey, of Normal, Illinois. They have a son, Wilfred 
John, Jr., born January 8, 1927. 

Mr. Goreham is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and holds membership in Arts and Crafts Lodge, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1013 

No. 1017, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Blooming- 
ton, Illinois; Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Kappa Delta, 
and Phi Sigma Iota fraternities. He is a member of the 
Illinois State Teachers Association, a life member of the 
National Education Association, and a member of the 
National Association of Secondary School Principals, and 
of the Illinois High School Principals Association. He 
belongs to the International Lyceum and Chautauqua 
Association, being listed as a lecturer in the Association's 
year book. Politically, Mr. Goreham is a Republican. 



Max Charles Schwartz is highly esteemed and widely 
known in Danville, where he is manager of the local offices 
of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. He was 
born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, November 14, 1891, the son 
of John and Mary (Brunner) Schwartz. 

John Schwartz, deceased, was a native of Germany. 
His early life was spent in his native land and he was 
interested in the general mercantile business with his 
father. He emigrated to the United States in 1870 and 
settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the 
grocery business for a number of years. He lived retired 
from 1890 until the time of his death in 1892. Mr. Schwartz 
is buried in Milwaukee. His widow, born in Germany, 
resides at Maywood, Illinois. The following children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz : Adolph, M. D., engaged in 
practice at Dallas, Texas; Joseph, attorney, lives at Den- 
ver, Colorado; Joanna, died at the age of six years; Rose, 
died at the age of four years; Fannie, married Maximillian 
Rehbock, lives at Maywood, Illinois; and Max Charles, the 
subject of this sketch. 

Max Charles Schwartz spent his boyhood in Chicago 
and attended the public schools. He began as an office boy 
in the employ of Spencer & Bartlett Company, wholesale 



1014 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

hardware dealers, and by hard work was steadily advanced 
until he became manager of the export and import depart- 
ment of the business. Mr. Schwartz resigned in 1919 and 
became associated with the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Company as a salesman in the Chicago offices. He later 
became assistant manager and on May 7, 1928, came to 
Danville in charge of the local agency. Offices are located 
in the Kresge Building. 

On October 15, 1915, Mr. Schwartz was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Malvina Sommer, of Chicago, the daughter 
of Ignatius and Theresa (Hajek) Sommer. Mr. Sommer, 
born in Bohemia, died in 1912. His widow lives in Chicago. 
Two daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz: 
Vivian and Lorraine, both students at Washington School, 
Danville. 

Mr. Schwartz is a Republican and a member of the 
Sons of Illinois Church, Chicago. 



Jack Moore Williams. — Jack Moore Williams, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born February 28, 1886, in Ionia 
County, Michigan, at a point five miles north of Muir and 
three miles west of Hubbardston in North Plains 
Township. 

He is the son of Frank Oliver Williams and Blanche 
Luella Moore, who are living near Ionia, Michigan. The 
father was born December 1, 1863, in Ionia County, Mich- 
igan, and the mother was born September 17, 1866, in 
Massachusetts. They were united in marriage April 9, 
1884, at Matherton, Michigan. 

Mr. Williams is directly descended from Job Williams, 
who with his younger brother, Daniel, came to New Eng- 
land from Wales in 1770, working their way over on a 
sailing vessel. Both fought in the Revolutionary War with 
the Colonists and Daniel Williams was killed in battle. At 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1015 

the close of the war, Job Williams settled in West Bloom- 
field Township, Ontario County, New York, where he mar- 
ried Miss Polly Apply. John Apply Williams, born in 1796, 
and Polly Apply Williams, born in 1799, were the fruits of 
this marriage. The mother died and Job Williams in 1801 
married again. 

John Apply Williams settled in New Lima Township, 
Alberta County, Ohio, later going to Michigan where he 
bought a farm in West Bloomfield Township, Oakland 
County, where he married a widow, Patience Jenks Parks. 
Four children were born to this marriage, John Oliver 
Williams, Olive Arulia Williams, Edwin Ruthven Wil- 
liams and Orin Williams, who died in infancy. 

John Oliver Williams returned to New York State, and 
married Miss Marian Abby, a school teacher, and settled 
in North Plains Township, Ionia County, Michigan, where 
his father had removed. 

Three sons were born to this marriage, Frank Oliver 
Williams, father of the subject of this sketch, Charles Wil- 
liams and Albert John Williams. Charles Williams is dead. 
John Oliver Williams died January 7, 1900, at Greenville, 
Michigan, and his wife died January 1, 1910, near Green- 
ville. 

Job Williams, Jr., son of Job Williams by the second 
marriage, came to Kankakee County, Illinois, and settled, 
despite the fact both his half-brother and half-sister 
migrated to Michigan. 

On the maternal side of his family, Mr. 'Williams's 
mother was the daughter of Cullen A. Moore, born May 1, 
1844, in Massachusetts, and who came with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Moore, to Michigan and settled 
near Lansing. The Moores were among the first settlers 
in the Massachusetts colony. 

Mr. Williams received his education in a small rural 
school and the schools of Ionia, Greenville and Lyons, Mich- 
igan. He was united in marriage August 21, 1905, to Miss 



1016 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Myrtle Hull in Charlotte, Michigan. One daughter was 
born to this union, Inez Edna, May 21, 1906, who is now 
Mrs. Gilbert Bunch, of Jackson, Michigan. 

He was united in marriage a second time April 12, 1924, 
in Danville, Illinois, to Mrs. Phoebe Lucile Fulton Bacon. 
A son, Frank Moore Williams, was born to this union Jan- 
uary 10, 1928, in Danville. Mrs. Williams also has two 
children by a former marriage, Eugene Franklin Bacon, 
born January 26, 1919, in Danville, Illinois, and Norma 
Belle Bacon, born February 8, 1921, in South Bend, Indiana. 

Mr. Williams, after several years of varied work, 
mostly spent in Detroit and Mount Clemens, Michigan, and 
Duluth, Minnesota, engaged in newspaper work in 1909 in 
Charlotte, Michigan, as a reporter on the Charlotte 
Tribune, a weekly. He went from there as editor of the 
Greenville, Michigan, Independent, a weekly, and later to 
the United Press Association, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, 
as advertising manager. He also worked as reporter on 
the Grand Rapids, Michigan, Herald, and operated the 
Michigan Advertising Agency in Grand Rapids. 

In 1918 he went to the Washington, District of Colum- 
bia Times as a reporter and assistant city editor, return- 
ing later to Jackson, Michigan, where he was Sunday 
editor on the Citizen-Press. Before coming to Danville, 
Illinois, January 1, 1928, he was on the copy desk of the 
Toledo, Ohio, Times; city editor of the Chippewa Falls, 
Wisconsin, Herald ; a reporter on the Kalamazoo, Michigan, 
Star; and owner of the Associated Newspaper Service, an 
advertising agency, in Cleveland, Ohio. 

He joined the reportorial staff of The Commercial- 
News, Danville, Illinois, January 1, 1923, which position he 
still holds. He was also appointed United States Com- 
missioner for the Eastern District of Illinois June 6, 1926, 
by Judge Walter C. Lindley of the United States District 
Court. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1017 

Mr. Williams is a member of the Saint James Methodist 
Episcopal Church, the American Business Club, the Mid- 
West Stamp Club and the American Aero Philatelic 
Society. He served three years as secretary of the Amer- 
ican Business Club and is secretary and treasurer of the 
Fifth District of American Business Clubs. Philately, or 
collecting stamps, is his hobby, and he is manager of the 
Exchange Department of the American Aero Philatelic 
Society, a national collectors' organization. 



Jean W. Moore, M. D., established his residence in the 
city of Danville in 1926, and here his ability and personal 
popularity have combined to mark him as one of the rep- 
resentative physicians and popular young professional men 
of Vermilion County. He is a native of Fairfield, Illinois, 
born September 12, 1897, the son of D. P. and Mary (Wall) 
Moore. 

D. P. Moore was born at Fairfield, Illinois, where he 
resides at the present time. He spent his boyhood on a 
farm and attended McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois, 
for two years. He was interested in the reorganization of 
the telephone company at Olney, and was identified with 
that for a period of thirteen years, after which he sold his 
interests to the Southeastern Illinois Telephone Company. 
Mr. Moore then purchased the Olney Times, of which he 
served as editor and manager for twelve years. At the 
present time he has extensive coal mining interests. His 
wife is a native of Wayne County, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore's children were Jean W., the subject of this sketch, 
and a daughter, Ellen, died at the age of seven. 

After completing his early schooling at Olney in 1915, 
Jean W. Moore entered McKendree College. On April 14, 
1917, however, he left college to enlist for service in the 
World War. He enlisted in the United States Navy and 



1018 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

was sent to the Great Lakes Training Station, Chicago, and 
subsequently to United States Navy Hospital, Annapolis, 
Maryland. In June, 1917, he was transferred to the United 
States Steamship Nevada, and served as pharmacist's mate 
until September 9, 1919, when he was discharged from the 
service. He then re-entered McKendree College, where he 
remained until 1919. He spent the following years at Indi- 
ana University, receiving the Bachelor of Science degree in 
1923 and in 1925 received the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
He served as an interne in Saint Elizabeth's Hospital, 
Danville, and in 1926 entered private practice in this city 
with offices in the Temple Building. He is a member of 
the staffs of Saint Elizabeth's and Lakeview Hospitals. 

On September 9, 1922, Doctor Moore was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Marjorie Spring, of Olney, Illinois, the 
daughter of Harry B. and Victoria (Eckenrode) Spring. 
Mr. Spring lives at Olney. His wife died in 1905. Two 
children have been born to Doctor and Mrs. Moore: 
Jeanine, born in 1925; and Harry Dalton, born in 1928. 

Doctor Moore is a member of Saint James Methodist 
Church; Olney Lodge, No. 140, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Gordon Commandery, Olney, Illinois; Danville 
Consistory, thirty-second degree; Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks; Loyal Order of Moose; American 
Business Club; Phi Beta Pi fraternity; and American 
Legion. Politically, Doctor Moore is a Republican. 



Clint Clay Tilton, of Danville, was born in Catlin, Illi- 
nois, May 10, 1870, the son of Sam R. and Lura G. (Vance) 
Tilton. His father was a pioneer merchant of Catlin and 
his mother a daughter of Major John W. Vance, who came 
to this county in 1824 and for a number of years operated 
the Old Vermilion Salines. Mr. Tilton graduated from 
the Catlin High School in 1886 and later attended the Uni- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1019 

versity of Illinois, but did not complete the course. For 
the next several years he worked in various eastern cities 
as a printer and newspaper reporter, until 1904, when he 
returned to Danville and became manager of the Daily 
Press, then owned by John Beard. In 1908, in conjunction 
with A. R. Lynch, he purchased the Daily Press and the 
Daily Democrat, and consolidated them under the name of 
The Press-Democrat. Five years later he purchased the 
interest of his partner and continued the operation of the 
paper until November, 1919, when, because of ill health, 
he disposed of the property to a local company. Since that 
date he has not engaged actively in any business, but has 
devoted much time to writing on historical subjects. He 
is the author of the "Genesis of Old Vermilion," the official 
history of the county centennial celebration. In 1913 he 
was appointed postmaster of Danville, which position he 
held for one year. 

On June 14, 1905, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Georgia May Wood, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Wood, of Bloomington, who still abides with him. A foster 
son, Amos Clint Tilton, now a lad of fifteen, lives with 
them. 



Winter L. Kimball is an enterprising and widely known 
business man of Danville, where he has engaged in busi- 
ness for a number of years. He was born at Urbana, Illi- 
nois, January 11, 1872, the son of Robert M. and Elizabeth 
(Conrad) Kimball. 

Robert M. Kimball, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil 
War. He was born near Princeton, Indiana, where he 
spent his boyhood and obtained his schooling. He was a 
tinner by trade and for a number of years operated a shop 
at Charleston, Illinois. He enlisted for service during the 
Civil War and following his discharge after the close of 
the war located at Urbana, Illinois, where he remained 



1020 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

until 1900. At that time he went to Auburn, Illinois, where 
he spent several years on a farm. After his retirement he 
lived in Danville and later at Fort Wayne, Indiana, where 
he died in 1924 at the age of eighty-four years. His wife 
died in 1913. Both are buried at Urbana, Illinois. Their 
children were: Winter L., the subject of this sketch; 
Roscoe, lives at Decatur, Illinois; Mildred Louise, married 
William Tipton, lives at Urbana, Illinois; Robert, lives at 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Lucretia, married Otis Mackey, lives at 
Jamesburg, Illinois; Tim, lives in Chicago; Ella, married 
Bert Hayman, lives in Chicago; James, died in infancy; 
and Fay, lives at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Winter L. Kimball grew up in Urbana, Illinois, where 
he attended the public schools. At an early age he learned 
the tinner's trade, which he has always followed. He was 
employed in his father's shop for some time and later by 
J. W. Shook for three years. Finally, when a young man, 
Mr. Kimball started out for himself and after several years 
located at Urbana, Illinois, where he was again associated 
with Mr. Shook. In 1898 he went to Muncie, Illinois, and 
took charge of the Intronuse Coal Company. Two years 
later he came to Danville and was associated with Bireline 
& Orr in the sheet metal business. In 1903 Mr. Kimball 
formed a partnership with Hiram Hickman and opened 
a tin shop on South Street, Danville. The following year 
the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Kimball continued 
at 1616 Franklin Street, which is the present location of 
the business. He is recognized as an expert in sheet metal 
and tinning work and also does slate and tar roofing. 

On November 23, 1892, Mr. Kimball was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lydia J. McGrew, of Lewis, Indiana, the 
daughter of David and Rebecca (Saltzgiver) McGrew. 
He was born at Canal Dover, Ohio, and died in 1914. His 
wife died in 1922. Eight children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Kimball, as follows: Floyd R., born November 13, 
1893, died January 25, 1897; Kossuth, born January 4, 1896, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1021 

died February 1, 1903; Grace G., born September 5, 1898, 
died February 1, 1903; Hubert Eugene, born August 17, 
1900, died February 1, 1903; Kenneth E., born in 1905, 
served during the World War in the United States Navy, 
lives at Saint Louis, Missouri; Austin O., born in 1906, 
associated with his father's business; Florence Mildred, 
married Harold Nolan, lives at Danville ; and Inez Rebecca, 
married Irvin Heisley, lives at Danville. 

Politically, Mr. Kimball is a Republican. He holds 
membership in the Christian Church, and is affiliated with 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Anchor Lodge, Past 
Master during 1918-19 ; Vermilion County Chapter No. 82, 
of which he is Past High Priest; Danville Council No. 37; 
Scottish Rite; and Gao Grotto. 



George W. Beaver, deceased, was a representative cit- 
izen of Henning and a veteran of the Civil War. He was 
born in Indiana, March 7, 1844, and died February 25, 
1923. Mr. Beaver was the son of John B. and Leah (Spade) 
Beaver. 

John B. Beaver was a native of Germany and his wife 
was born in Indiana. They were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: Emmanuel, lives in Indiana; Jacob; Aaron, 
lives in Indiana; George W., the subject of this sketch; and 
Sarah Mise, lives in Indiana. 

George W. Beaver attended the district schools of 
Indiana and spent his boyhood on his father's farm. He 
was interested in farming and stock raising throughout 
his life and spent more than half a century on the Albert 
farm in Vermilion County. He retired in 1907 and 
removed to Henning, where he lived until his death in 
1923. During the Civil War Mr. Beaver served as a private 
in Capt. John Leonard's Company K, Nineteenth Regiment. 
He was discharged at Elmira, New York, July 12, 1865. 



1022 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

In 1871 Mr. Beaver married Miss Mary Jane Albert, the 
daughter of Henry and Margaret (Weaver) Albert. He 
was born in Pennsylvania and died in 1866. His wife, a 
native of Ohio, died in 1870. Five children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Beaver, as follows: John, born April 11, 

1872, died November 26, 1875; Henry, born December 3, 

1873, farmer, lives on the old homestead in Vermilion 
County; Addie, born September 29, 1875, married Frank 
Fairchild, farmer, lives in Indiana; Edward, born March 
8, 1879, died August 11, 1879; and an infant daughter, born 
March 7, 1882, deceased. 

Mr. Beaver was a member of the United Brethren 
Church early in life and later was identified with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. He was affiliated with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Politically, he was a Republican, 
and served for several years as justice of the peace of 
Blount Township, Vermilion County. 

Mrs. Beaver is a member of the Free Methodist Church 
and Women's Missionary Society. She has thirteen grand- 
children and nine great-grandchildren. Mrs. Beaver, 
although eighty-eight years of age, remains active 
in church and social work and is among the interesting 
pioneer women of Vermilion County. 



Harlin Melville Steely, Jr., is one of the successful and 
popular attorneys of Vermilion County, and is engaged in 
active practice in Danville as a member of the firm of 
Steely and Steely. He was born in this city, the son of 
Harlin Melville and Miriam M. (Marquess) Steely. 

A sketch of Harlin M. Steely appears elsewhere in this 
history. 

Harlin M. Steely, Jr., attended the public schools of 
Danville and began his college career as a student at the 
University of Chicago. In 1904 he entered Yale Univer- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1023 

sity, from which he was graduated in 1908 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. He was an associate editor 
of the Yale Record; member of the Skull and Crescent 
Society; the Kopper Kettle Club; the Glee and Banjo Clubs. 

Mr. Steely studied law with his father and in February, 
1911, was admitted to practice in Illinois. He is a member 
of the Vermilion County and Illinois State Bar Associa- 
tions. He was city attorney of Danville from 1917 until 
1919. He is president of the Danville Civic Council and in 
1925 was president of the Kiwanis Club of Danville. 

Mr. Steely is a thirty-second degree Mason, a Shriner, 
an Elk, and a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. 



J. S. Cromwell. — One of the recognized leading men of 
Fairmount is J. S. Cromwell, who is identified with the 
general mercantile business of J. S. Cromwell & Son. He 
was born on a farm near Fithian, February 2, 1865, the 
son of Jackson and Mary Jane (Meade) Cromwell. 

Jackson Cromwell was born at Marion, Indiana, and 
his wife was a native of Illinois. He followed farming 
throughout his life. He died March 31, 1920, and his wife 
died May 27, 1923. Both are buried in McFarland Ceme- 
tery. Their children were: Jackson and Maria Hender- 
son, both deceased; J. D., lives at Fithian; J. S., the subject 
of this sketch; Cora Reams, lives at Fairmount; Rosetta 
and Nellie, both deceased. 

J. S. Cromwell spent his early years on a farm near 
Fithian and attended the district schools. He followed 
farming until 1896 when he removed to Fithian and 
engaged in business as the proprietor of a grist mill. The 
mill was destroyed by fire in December, 1901, and in the 
spring of 1902 Mr. Cromwell located on a farm near Mc- 
Kindree, Illinois, where he remained until 1914. He has 
since been a resident of Fairmount. He purchased the 



1024 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

hardware business of W. W. Burroughs which he later sold 
to W. F. Temple. In 1915 he purchased the department 
store of J. A. Cox, which he conducted in partnership with 
his nephew, W. E. Black, under the firm name of Cromwell 
& Black. Since 1926 Mr. Cromwell has been associated in 
business with his son, L. J. Cromwell. 

Mr. Cromwell was married (first) on May 9, 1886, to 
Miss Laura Ellen Firebaugh, who died September 15, 1895. 
She is buried in Stearns Cemetery, near Muncie, Illinois. 
She was the daughter of Thomas and Lucinda (Hobick) 
Firebaugh. He died in 1903 and his wife died in 1913. 
Both are buried at Mount Vernon, Illinois. Three children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Cromwell: Bertha 0., who died 
in 1910, was the wife of Jackson Richter, and they had two 
sons, Ralph J., who lives at Fairmount, and Bernard, who 
lives at Dearborn, Michigan; Charles H., lives at Danville, 
married Florence Howard, and they have two children, 
Delores and Robert; and Jesse D., lives at Danville, mar- 
ried Emma Howard, and they have three children, Tex 
Howard, Zella, and Margaret, all graduates of Danville 
High School. 

Mr. Cromwell was married (second) to Miss Eva J. 
Underwood, who died in March, 1918. She was the daugh- 
ter of L. C. and Sarah (Kyger) Underwood, who died in 
1917 and 1925, respectively. To J. S. and Eva J. (Under- 
wood) Cromwell were born nine children, as follows: Lela 
M., born September 18, 1899, a graduate of Fairmount 
High School, now teaches school; Lola, born January 1, 
1901, died August 15, 1901; L. J., born December 23, 1901, 
associated in business with his father, married Zella Ellis, 
and they have two children, Harold Cromwell, and Olive 
June; Mary E., Sarah, Ruth, and Daphne M., all graduates 
of Fairmount High School, now teachers; George C, and 
Grace E., students. 

On January 25, 1921, Mr. Cromwell was married (third) 
to Alice L. Fennemore, of Sidney, Illinois, the daughter of 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1025 

George W. and Catherine (Morgan) Fennemore. He died 
in 1917 and his wife died in 1919. 

Mr. Cromwell has served as tax collector of Oakwood 
Township and as assessor of McKindree Township. He is 
a Republican, a member of the Methodist Church, Modern 
Woodmen of America, and Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Mr. Cromwell is the owner of a fine farm of two hun- 
dred thirty acres in McKindree Township. 



William F. Gerety, M. D., is prominent in Danville as 
one of the most successful physicians and surgeons of Ver- 
milion County. He was born in this city, August 23, 1883, 
the son of Thomas and Margaret (Kelly) Gerety. 

Thomas Gerety was born in Ireland, as was also his 
wife. He emigrated to the United States when about 
eighteen years of age and settled in Danville, where he 
worked in the old Moss Bank coal mines. Later, he was 
employed by his brother, who conducted a business at 122 
West Main Street. After the death of his brother, Thomas 
Gerety took over the business, which he conducted success- 
fully for forty-five years. He died in 1908 and his wife 
died in 1918. Both are buried in Saint Patrick's Cemetery, 
Danville. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Gerety were : 
Margaret, who died in 1892; James, who died in 1917; Cath- 
erine, the widow of Daniel Murphy, lives at the old home- 
stead, 122 Payne Avenue, Danville; Anna, who died in 
1892; William F., the subject of this sketch; Mary, lives 
at home; and Barney S., owner of Worthams World Best 
Shows, Little Rock, Arkansas. 

William F. Gerety grew up in Danville and attended 
the public schools here. He clerked in the drug store of 
Owen & Raines for two years, and then went to Decatur, 
Illinois, where he took over the management of a drug 

31— Vol. 2 



1026 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

store in the Wabash Hospital for two years. In 1904 he 
entered the University of Illinois, and four years later 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He then 
returned to the Wabash Railroad Hospital as house physi- 
cian and in 1911 located at Danville, where he established 
a private practice with offices at 2OIV2 East Main Street. 
He removed to his present location, 126% East Main Street, 
in 1924. 

On November 3, 1910, Doctor Gerety was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Margaret Meehan, of Decatur, Illinois, the 
daughter of William and Nellie (Fisher) Meehan. Mr. 
Meehan, now eighty-five years of age, lives at Decatur. 
His wife died in 1921. Doctor and Mrs. Gerety have a son, 
William Francis, born August 8, 1918. He attends Rose- 
lawn School, Danville. 

Doctor Gerety is a member of Saint Paul's Catholic 
Church, and belongs to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and Loyal Order of Moose. He is identified 
with the Vermilion County Medical Society and Illinois 
State Medical Society, and is a member of the staff of 
Saint Elizabeth's Hospital, Danville. 



Martin L. Brookshier, M. D., is a prominent general 
medical practitioner of Georgetown. He is a well known 
citizen and is a leading member of the Vermilion County 
Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, and Amer- 
ican Medical Association. 

Doctor Brookshier was born in Clark County, Ken- 
tucky, January 12, 1878, the son of Achilles and Susan 
(Moreland) Brookshier. 

Achilles Brookshier was born in Kentucky. He was 
educated in the district schools, taught school for several 
terms, and subsequently studied law. He followed farm- 
ing, however, throughout his life and met with an acci- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1027 

dental death in a runaway at Gainesville, Texas, in 1896. 
His wife died in 1919. Both are buried at Winchester, Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Brookshier was a Democrat and a member of 
the Baptist Church. His wife held membership in the 
Christian Church. Five sons and two daughters were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Brookshier, all of whom are still living. 

Martin Brookshier, the paternal grandfather of Martin 
L. Brookshier, was a Pennsylvanian by birth, and his wife, 
Amanda (Cummings) Brookshier, was of Irish extraction. 
They were pioneer settlers of Clark County, Kentucky, 
where the latter part of their lives was spent. They 
were the parents of thirteen children. On the maternal 
side the grandparents, George and Sally M. (Robertson) 
Moreland, were born in Pennsylvania, and settled in Clark 
County, Kentucky, at an early date. He died many years 
ago but his widow survived him until 1913, when she died 
at the age of one hundred and six years. She had lived on 
the same farm for seventy years. 

Martin L. Brookshier received his early education in 
the district schools of Clark County, Kentucky. At the age 
of seventeen years he came to Illinois and settled at Deca- 
tur. He attended Green Academy at Taylorville, Illinois, 
and also studied at Marion Academy, at Marion, Indiana. 
He subsequently took a preparatory course in medicine at 
Willow Springs, Missouri, and in the spring of 1897 located 
at Pontiac, Illinois, where he spent almost three years in a 
shoe factory. He entered Barnes Medical School at Saint 
Louis, Missouri, in 1889, from which he received his 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1903. He began the prac- 
tice of medicine at Graymount, Illinois, and after nineteen 
months located at Pontiac, Illinois. He later practiced at 
Decatur and Olivet, Illinois, and in September, 1917, came 
to Georgetown, where he purchased the Whitlock residence 
on Fifth Street. In 1924 he moved his office to Main Street 
and built a beautiful home on the adjoining lot. He erected 
an office and store building in 1927 and opened the Brook- 



1028 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

shier Drug Store, which is managed by his son, M. J. 
Brookshier. 

On September 7, 1904, Doctor Brookshier was united 
in marriage with Miss Josephine Beier, of Bloomington, 
Illinois, the daughter of H. J. and Rickie (Cruse) Beier, 
natives of Germany. To Doctor and Mrs. Brookshier were 
born eight children, as follows: M. J., born June 14, 1905, 
lives at Georgetown, married Opal Hughes, and they have 
two sons, M. J., Jr., and Robert; Mildred Fern, died in 
infancy; Norwood Martin, born November 17, 1909, lives 
at Georgetown; Donald A., born September 9, 1911, stu- 
dent; Orville A., born August 1, 1914, student; Frieda 
Lorene, born April 23, 1917, student; Susan L, born Decem- 
ber 24, 1920; and Paul Wayne, born March 17, 1922. 

Doctor Brookshier is a member of the Nazarene 
Church. 



E. C. Matthius is a veteran of the World War and one 
of the best known young men of Lyons, where he is con- 
nected with the shops of the Big Four Railroad as foreman 
of car shops. He was born at Evanston, Illinois, August 
11, 1894, the son of J. D. and Adella (Reinke) Matthius. 

Rev. J. D. Matthius was born at Staten Island, New 
York, and his wife was a native of Chicago. She died in 
September, 1916, and is buried at Battle Creek, Michigan. 
Reverend Matthius was educated in the parochial schools 
of New York City and attended the Lutheran Theological 
College, at Fort Wayne, Indiana. He was later graduated 
from Concordia Seminary at Saint Louis, Missouri, in 1891 
and was immediately made assistant pastor of the Bethle- 
hem Lutheran Church, Chicago. He was also in charge of 
missionary work on the north shore of Chicago, between 
Edgewater and Glencoe, Illinois. In 1893 he took charge 
of the Bethlehem Church at Evanston, Illinois, and later 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1029 

established self sustaining congregations at Rogers Park, 
Wilmot, and Glencoe, Illinois. In 1910 Reverend Matthius 
was called to the Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, of 
Indianapolis, Indiana, where he is now serving as pastor. 
He is district president of the Missouri Synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church and president of the Foreign 
Missionary. To Reverend and Mrs. Matthius were born 
five children, as follows: R. H., lives at Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana; E. C, the subject of this sketch; Ada, unmarried, lives 
at Indianapolis, Indiana ; Irma, married Jerry Jordon, lives 
at Indianapolis, Indiana; and Luella, unmarried, lives at 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

The boyhood of E. C. Matthius was spent at Evanston, 
Illinois, where he was educated. At the age of sixteen 
years he went to Indianapolis, Indiana, with his parents 
and began his business career as a salesman for the Marott 
Department Store. In October, 1912, he entered the employ 
of the Big Four Railway as a clerk in the offices at Beech 
Grove, Indiana. The following year he was promoted to 
cost accountant and served in that capacity until 1917, at 
which time he went to Brightwood, Indiana. In April, 

1917, he enlisted for service in the World War and was 
sent to Columbus, Ohio, and later to Fort Monroe, Vir- 
ginia, where he served as a first-class sergeant with the 
Forty-first Division. He was discharged December 12, 

1918, and went to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he resumed 
his former work with the Big Four Railroad Company at 
Brightwood, Indiana. He was transferred to Mattoon, 
Illinois, July 29, 1922, as assistant general car foreman and 
on December 1, 1927, accepted his present position at Lyons 
as car foreman of the shops. 

On October 6, 1920, Mr. Matthius was married to Miss 
Helen Resener, of Indianapolis, Indiana, the daughter of 
E. B. and Mary (Wehking) Resener, of Indianapolis. They 
have three daughters : Myra A., born June 16, 1921 ; Mary 



1030 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Elizabeth, born October 16, 1923; and Mona Lee, born 
June 19, 1926, died in infancy. 

Mr. Matthius is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, of Indianapolis, Indiana. He is affiliated with 
the American Legion, and Country Club of Mattoon. 
Politically, he is a Republican. 



Harry Sager is numbered among the enterprising men 
of Danville, where he is proprietor of the Sager Feed Mill. 
He was born in Marion County, Illinois, September 18, 
1889, the son of Jacob and Mary (Allen) Sager. 

Jacob Sager was born on a farm in Marion County, 
Illinois. He followed farming and stock raising there until 
1899, at which time he removed to Kell, Illinois, where he 
became interested in business as a dealer in farm imple- 
ments and machinery. He later conducted a meat business 
at that place and in 1903 came to Danville, where he 
operated a grocery and meat business at Oaklawn for two 
years. He then sold his business and entered the employ of 
the Chicago and Eastern Railroad, being employed in the 
Danville shops until his death in 1906. He is buried in 
Marion County. His widow, born in Wayne County, Illi- 
nois, lives at 1520 Oakwood Avenue, Danville. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Sager were born five children : Harry, the subject of 
this sketch; Stella, the widow of C. E. Lunger, lives at 
Champaign, Illinois; J. L., World War veteran, lives at 
Los Angeles, California; Fleeta, married D. Pilcher, lives 
at Toledo, Ohio; and Roy, lives at Oceanside, California. 

Harry Sager spent his boyhood on his father's farm in 
Marion County and obtained his education in the public 
schools of Kell and Danville. He as employed as a call 
boy by the Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad and later 
traveled for the company installing electrical appliances 
on the road. He continued in this work until 1919 when he 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1031 

opened a garage in Danville. This was sold five years 
later and in 1924 Mr. Sager purchased the property at 
Buchanan and Green Streets, which is the site of his pres- 
ent business. He carries on a wholesale and retail busi- 
ness, his warehouse having a three car capacity. Mr. 
Sager has attained success in his business by hard work. 
At an early age he assumed the responsibility of caring 
for his widowed mother and younger brothers and sisters, 
his father having died when he was seventeen years of 
age. Thus as a boy he possessed the same traits of a suc- 
cessful business man that are his today. 

In 1919 Mr. Sager was united in marriage with Miss 
Pearl Brubaker, of Danville, the daughter of George and 
Mayme (Abrams) Brubaker. The former is deceased and 
the latter lives in Danville. Mr. and Mrs. Sager have no 
children. 

In politics Mr. Sager is independent. 



Henry Snider. — One of Vermilion County's most promi- 
nent citizens and successful business men was Henry 
Snider, of Georgetown, who died November 16, 1928. He 
was a native of Kaief, Russia, born April 20, 1860. 

Mr. Snider was the oldest child of a large family. His 
father died when he was very young, thus making it neces- 
sary for him to help care for the family. When he was 
twenty-one years of age he came to America and settled 
at Lafayette, Indiana, where he spent four years. He was 
possessed of an energetic and industrious disposition and 
from the very beginning of his business career met with 
marked success. As a merchant, he traveled by horse and 
wagon throughout the surounding community, buying but- 
ter and eggs from farmers, in exchange for which he gave 
merchandise. Mr. Snider's business gradually drifted into 
Cumberland County, Illinois, and it was he who was the 



1032 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

founder of the town of Roslyn, where he established a 
general mercantile business in 1890. At that time he also 
became postmaster of the newly organized village. In 
1894 Mr. Snider sold his business at Roslyn and moved to 
Haze, Illinois. Subsequently he located at Fairland, Illi- 
nois, and in 1897 went to Villa Grove, where he conducted 
a general mercantile business until 1900. He then came 
to Vermilion County and erected a large store building in 
Georgetown, and engaged in business with Gordon Grimes, 
a local school teacher. After three years Mr. Snider pur- 
chased his partner's interest and carried on the business 
until 1907, at which time he settled at Westville, where he 
was associated with C. B. Spang in the mercantile busi- 
ness. After a year Mr. Snider again purchased his part- 
ner's interest in the business. He also had extensive real 
estate interests at Westville, being the promoter of the Sni- 
der addition, just outside the city limits of Westville. He 
also conducted a mercantile business at Lyons, Illinois, and 
in 1924 established a business at Georgetown, which is now 
carried on by his daughter, Miss Esther Snider. She is 
also proprietor of the store at Ridge Farm, which was 
established by her father in 1927. 

On November 26, 1892, Mr. Snider was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sarah Frederick, of Roslyn, the daughter 
of Oliver and Lucy (Warner) Frederick. He was born 
in Kentucky and died in 1888. His wife, born in Putnam 
County, Indiana, died in 1928 at the age of ninety-one 
years. Both are buried at Toledo, Illinois. Mrs. Henry 
Snider died February 23, 1920, and is buried in Spring- 
hill Cemetery, Danville. To Mr. and Mrs. Snider were 
born three children: Harry, born at Rosyln, Illinois, 
December 6, 1893, died October 4, 1927; Esther, born 
August 24, 1899, a graduate of Danville High School and 
the University of Illinois, taught school at Indianola and 
Tuscola, Illinois, now manager of the stores and business 
which were established by her father; and Rachael, born 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1033 

January 6, 1908, married on March 2, 1929, to 0. E. Min- 
niear, and lives at Danville. 

Mr. Snider was affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He is buried in Springhill Cemetery, 
Danville. 



Gladys Price Brown, who is identified with the Physi- 
cians and Surgeons Exchange, is recognized as one of the 
highly successful young women of Danville. She was born 
at Fairmount, Vermilion County, May 26, 1897, the daugh- 
ter of Charles M. and Alice M. (Yerkes) Price. 

A complete sketch of Charles M. Price appears else- 
where in this history. 

Gladys Price attended the public schools of Fairmount 
and after her graduation from high school entered Eastern 
Illinois State Normal School, Charleston, Illinois. She is a 
graduate of Gem City Business College, Quincy, Illinois, 
Kellberg Institute, Chicago, and the School of Physical 
Therapy, Saint Joseph, Missouri. Part of her education 
was received in night schools her entire expenses being 
earned by her efforts in the business world. She also taught 
school for six and one-half years and after her gradua- 
tion from the Kellberg Institute she spent four years con- 
ducting a department of physical therapy in Danville. As 
the result of her continued association with doctors she 
realized the necessity of a Physicians and Surgeons Ex- 
change, which was created by her in June, 1928. The 
entire work of organization was carried on by Mrs. Brown 
alone. 

The Physicians and Surgeons Exchange and Nurses 
Registry in the city of Danville is the first and only doc- 
tor's information exchange in Vermilion County. It is 
a free service to the public and is financed by dues paid 
by the doctors who are members of this organization. The 
year of 1928 was devoted entirely to the organization 



1034 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

process, which consisted of selling the doctors and adver- 
tising a service to which the public has heartily responded. 
The Exchange now includes a Nurses Registry which sup- 
plies graduate, undergraduate, and practical nurses not 
only for the city of Danville but for outlying towns and 
communities where help is needed. At the present time 
the Exchange has a total of forty-two doctors registered. 

On March 5, 1927, Gladys Price married George H. 
Brown, who was born at Saint Joe, DeKalb County, Indi- 
ana, the son of Calvin H. and Alice (Swineford) Brown. 
Mr. Brown lives at Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his wife 
died July 10, 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have a daughter, 
Dorothy Alice. 

Mrs. Brown is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, Fairmount, and belongs to the Business and Pro- 
fessional Women's Club and Vermilion County Republican 
Women's Club. 



Charles M. Price, retired, is a representative citizen 
of Fairmount, having spent his entire life on the old Price 
homestead. He was born March 27, 1860, the son of 
George and Ruth (Wooden) Price. 

George Price was born in Madison County, Ohio, 
August 19, 1834. He came to Illinois from Ohio when 
nineteen years of age and accumulated valuable land hold- 
ings, which he improved. He was especially interested in 
the buying and shipping of cattle and at the time of his 
death left a large estate. He was known throughout the 
community as "Uncle George." Mr. Price died January 9, 
1912, and his wife, born at Catlin, Vermilion County, July 
25, 1830, died February 28, 1917, Both are buried in 
Daugherty Cemetery, Fairmount. To Mr. and Mrs. George 
Price the following children were born: John Wesley, 
deceased; Elizabeth Baldwin, deceased; Josephine Rice, 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1035 

lives at Sidell, Illinois; Eugene, died in infancy; Addie 
Jackson, lives at Sidell; Alberta Clapp, deceased. 

Charles M. Price attended Jordan school near Fair- 
mount and at an early age assisted his father with his 
farming and stock interests. At the time of his marriage, 
at the age of twenty-seven years, he took over the man- 
agement of the home farm, at which time his father 
retired. From then on his activities were confined to 
grain raising, which he continued until his retirement at 
the age of fifty-five years. He has continued to reside on 
the old Price homestead and superintends his farming 
interests. 

On October 19, 1887, Mr. Price married Miss Alice Maud 
Yerkes, of Fairmount, the daughter of Hiram and Hester 
E. (Prevo) Yerkes, the former a native of Ohio and the 
latter of Indiana. Mr. Yerkes died June 3, 1913. His wife 
died December 7, 1877. Hiram Yerkes enlisted in the 
Union Army during the Civil War as a member of Com- 
pany H, Sixty-third Indiana Infantry, in August, 1862. He 
fought in sixteen battles and followed his regiment in all 
its marches, participating in all the hardships and vicis- 
situdes of a soldier's life. The records indicate that he 
was one of the bravest men of his company and while at 
the front in some of the hardest fought battles of the war 
stood at his post without fear and flinching. He was con- 
tented to enter the ranks as a private soldier, but was soon 
promoted to the rank of corporal and afterward became 
sergeant. He met the enemy in battle at Reseca, Georgia, 
Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee, Atlanta, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Jonesboro, Cassville, Lost Mountain, Altoona, 
Chattahoochie, Town Creek, Burnt Hickory, Buzzard's 
Roost, Fort Anderson, Wilmington, and Columbia, North 
Carolina. He was at one time entirely buried in the dirt 
plowed up by a rebel cannon ball, escaping by a miracle 
from being torn to pieces by the deadly missile. He wit- 
nessed the surrender of General Johnson, through General 



1036 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Sherman, but the joy of the Union Army was soon sad- 
dened by the news of Lincoln's assassination. In July, 
1865, the regiment was discharged and Mr. Yerkes mus- 
tered out at Indianapolis. 

To Charles M. and Alice Maud (Yerkes) Price were 
born live children: Walter Earl and Lowell Milton, both 
died in infancy; Ethel Lynn, who is identified with the 
New York Life Insurance Company, Decatur, Illinois; 
Gladys Brown, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
history; and Mabel Redmond, lives at Decatur, Illinois. 

Mr. Price is a Republican. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Fairmount. 
He is familiarly known throughout the community as "The 
Deacon," a title which clings to him on account of his 
active service in the church. 



William Brooks Murray is among the prominent and 
widely known business executives of Danville, where he 
is identified with the Miller Train Control Company. He 
also takes an active part in the civic and social life of the 
city and is president of the Rotary Club of Danville. Mr. 
Murray was born at Dunkirk, New York, August 5, 1875, 
the son of Eugene and Addie (Brooks) Murray. 

William Brooks Murray was educated in the public 
schools of New York City. He studied engineering at 
Portland, Oregon, and New Haven, Connecticut, and in 
1893 was employed as a railroad fireman. Two years later 
he became a railroad engineer. Later, he became inter- 
ested in stationary engineering with the Hill-Miller Com- 
pany of Washington, of which he became chief engineer in 
1896, erecting engineer in 1898, and the following year he 
was appointed chief engineer of the Palais Royal. In 
1908 he entered business for himself as general manager 
of the Murray Engineering Company, doing general con- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1037 

tracting and machine construction work. In the latter 
work he served as advisory engineer for the Miller Train 
Control Company, and in 1911 gave up all connections to 
devote himself entirely to designing and perfecting a 
workable train control system. The system, as evolved by 
Mr. Murray, was first installed on the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois Railroad in 1911, and its success has been cited 
by Congressman Esch, author of the Esch-Cummins Trans- 
portation Act, as justification for the installation of train 
controls on all railroads, as provided by the Act. In 
making the citation Mr. Esch stated that after what has 
been proven on the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad, 
the cost of installation was justifiable on account of the 
benefits to be derived in conservation of life, and prop- 
erty, and in facilitation of traffic. 

Altogether forty-nine different railroads have been 
affected by this act, which requires adoption of train con- 
trol systems, and it is estimated that the first cost of the 
installations will not be less than two hundred million dol- 
lars. Many of the roads have already begun the installa- 
tion of these systems and among them the Miller Train 
Control System is now engaged in installing the Miller 
Control on the lines of the New York Central Railroad 
east of Cleveland, Ohio, a work which is being conducted 
under the personal direction of Mr. Murray. 

Among those who are personally interested with Mr. 
Murray in the Miller Train Control Company is Mr. H. B. 
Miller, of Washington, D. C, who is general manager; J. 
W. Garber, of Washington, D. C, is president; and William 
Dupont, of Wilmington, Delaware, is chairman of the com- 
pany's executive committee. 

Including Mr. Murray's professional and fraternal 
affiliations may be mentioned the Washington Society of 
Engineers, the Railway Signal Engineers Association, the 
National Railway Association, Chicago Engineers, Na- 
tional Association of Steam Engineers, and National Rail- 



1038 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

way Appliance Association. He is president of the Rotary 
Club, and belongs to the Old Colony Club of New York, 
Elks Club, Masonic Lodge, thirty-second degree, and 
Chamber of Commerce. He is a Republican and a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Murray is familiarly 
known in Danville in engineering circles as "Safety First 
Bill Murray." 

In 1902 Mr. Murray married Miss Georgia Farnsworth, 
of Silver Creek, New York. They have three daughters: 
Martha, Flora, and Laura. 



George W. Johnson, who is identified with the Inter- 
state Baking Company, ranks among the progressive busi- 
ness men of Danville, and he is also a veteran of the World 
War. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, October 24, 1886, 
the son of Gus and Anna (Abrams) Johnson. 

Gus Johnson was a native of Illinois and spent many 
years in the employ of the Pullman Car Company. Both 
he and his wife died in 1891 and are buried at Attica, 
Indiana. They were the parents of three children: Arthur 
E., druggist, lives at Indianapolis, Indiana; Luella, lives 
in Chicago, Illinois; and George W., the subject of this 
sketch. 

George W. Johnson received his early schooling at 
Attica, Indiana, and was graduated from high school there 
in 1904. He then came to Danville and in September, 1905, 
entered Brown's Business College, from which he was 
graduated in 1906. He began his business career with 
the Webster Grocery Company as assistant secretary, and 
was identified with that concern until 1918. In may, 1918, 
he enlisted for service in the World War and was sent to 
Camp Kearney, California, where he was attached to the 
Eighty-first Infantry. He served as company clerk in 
charge of mail service and throughout the war was located 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1039 

at that camp, being discharged in February, 1919, with 
the rank of corporal. Mr. Johnson returned to the employ 
of the Webster Grocery Company until December, 1919, 
at which time he purchased an interest in the Manteufel 
Baking Company, the firm name then being known as the 
Interstate Baking Company. This partnership has con- 
tinued to the present time and the company's business 
extends throughout Danville and surrounding territory. 
This up-to-date bakery is located at 850-52 Fairchild Street. 

In 1924 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage with Miss 
Erma Fix, the daughter of Edward W. and Anna Fix, the 
former a native of Warren County, Indiana, and the latter 
of Danville. Mr. Fix lives at Saint Louis, Missouri. His 
wife died in December, 1923, and is buried in Springhill 
Cemetery, Danville. He is extensively interested in the 
manufacturing business, being one of the founders of 
the Quality Stove & Range Company and the Oakland 
Foundry. 

Politically, Mr. Johnson is identified with the Repub- 
lican party. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran 
Church, Kiwanis Club, and Bakers of Illinois, and he has 
the following club affiliations: Anchor Lodge, No. 980, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple; Iris Chapter; and 
American Legion. 



The Interstate Baking Company is among the well 
established and up-to-date bakeries of Vermilion County. 
It is located at 850-52 Fairchild Street, Danville. This 
pioneer business house of Danville was organized as the 
Manteufel Baking Company in 1898, its original location 
being at 863-65 East Fairchild Street. The business was 
begun in a small way, employing only three men. About 
1914 it was enlarged and the present extensive plant built 



1040 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

on Fairchild Street. In 1920, at the time of Mr. George 
W. Johnson's entry into the firm the name was changed 
to the Interstate Baking Company. 

Modern equipment is in use throughout the plant, which 
employs eighteen men and operates five motor trucks in 
Danville and vicinity. The average monthly business has 
increased from one thousand dollars to approximately ten 
thousand dollars. The plant is open to the public for 
inspection at all times. Its trademark, "Par-X," is out- 
standing as a symbol of high grade bakery products. 

The Interstate Baking Company may be justly proud 
of its modern facilities for the baking of bread. From the 
electric dough mixers, to the rounding machines, even the 
process of weighing has been eliminated. The bread then 
is moulded by machine, which eliminates handling by hand, 
and it then goes to the proofing pan before reaching the 
electric ovens. After the baking process is complete, the 
bread is automatically wrapped and sealed by a machine 
which handles fifteen hundred loaves per hour. 



Herman Manteufel. — Prominent among the pioneer 
business men of Danville may be mentioned Herman Man- 
teufel, founder of the Interstate Baking Company. He is 
a native of Germany, born at Hessenaussa, May 10, 1869, 
the son of Louis and Hermina (Pope) Manteufel. 

Louis Manteufel was born in Germany in 1839 and his 
wife was born in 1842. He was a graduate of a mining 
college in Germany and became prominent as a mining 
engineer, being superintendent of a mine at Hessenaussa. 
He came with his family to the United States in 1878 and 
settled near Hobart, Lake County, Indiana. He spent the 
remainder of his life as a farmer and stockman. Mr. 
Manteufel died in 1912 and his wife died in 1918. Both are 
buried near Hobart, Indiana. Mr. Manteufel was a Repub- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1041 

lican and a member of the German Methodist Church. The 
following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Manteufel: 
Helen and Laura, both deceased; Paulina, deceased, was 
the wife of Adolph Wendt, of Chicago, Illinois; Bertha, 
deceased; Marie, married Fred Mayhak, lives at Gary, 
Indiana; Herman, the subject of this sketch; Louis, lives 
on the old homestead near Hobart, Indiana; and Paul, lives 
at Oak Park, Illinois. 

Herman Manteufel spent his early boyhood in Ger- 
many and Hobart, Indiana, where he attended the public 
schools. At the age of sixteen years he went to Chicago, 
Illinois, where he learned the baker's trade with the Heis- 
ler & Young Baking Company. In 1887 he was employed 
at the Palmer House, Chicago, and was one of the bakers 
at that hostelry at the time of the visit of President Cleve- 
land on his wedding trip. Mr. Manteufel came to Dan- 
ville in 1892 and entered the employ of the Linne Baking- 
Company. Six years later he established a baking busi- 
ness of his own, known as the Manteufel Bakery, at 863-65 
East Fairchild Street. The modern plant was built at 
850-52 East Fairchild Street in 1914. A complete sketch 
of the growth and development of this business appears 
elsewhere in this history. Mr. Johnson has been identified 
with the enterprise since 1920. 

In 1899 Mr. Manteufel married Miss Margaret Hosch, 
the daughter of Andrew and Mary (Koch) Hosch, natives 
of Germany, both now deceased. The Hosch family emi- 
grated to the United States about 1860 and settled at 
Reading, Pennsylvania, later removing to Danville in 1866. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Manteufel a daughter, Esther, was born. 
She is a graduate of Danville High School and is employed 
in a clerical capacity in the auditor's office of Vermilion 
County. 

Mr. Manteufel is a member of the German Methodist 
Church, Knights of Pythias, No. 84, and belongs to the 

32— Vol. 2 



1042 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Illinois Bakers Association, American Society of Bakers 
Engineers, and American Bakers Association. Politically, 
he is a Republican. 



Charles Maurice Crayton. — Holding high rank in legal 
circles in Vermilion County, Charles Maurice Crayton is 
also well known in Danville as the efficient state superin- 
tendent of Free Employment Offices. He was born at 
Hillsboro, Indiana, November 9, 1872, the son of George 
May and Elizabeth Murphy (Guilliamo) Crayton. 

George May Crayton was born in Fountain County, 
Indiana, in 1828, the son of Thomas and Susan (May) 
Crayton. He was the son of an Irish immigrant, who 
settled in North Carolina, and his wife, Susan (May) Cray- 
ton, was a grand-daughter of Captain Billie May, and a 
daughter of George May, early pioneers of Indiana. Cap- 
tain Billie May was an officer in the Mexican War and a 
prominent man. The maternal grandfather, John L. Guil- 
liamo, was born in Scotland and was an early settler of 
Tennessee. George May Crayton was a merchant for 
many years at Hillsboro, Indiana, where he died in 1880. 
His wife, born in Fountain County, Indiana, in 1837, died 
August 3, 1910. Both are buried at Hillsboro. Their chil- 
dren were: Henry A., lives at Danville; John M., William 
A., T. V., and Thomas E., all deceased; Jennie, married 
Joseph Parker, lives at Los Angeles, California; and 
Charles Maurice, the subject of this sketch. 

The boyhood of Charles Maurice Crayton was spent at 
Hillsboro, Indiana, and Potomac, Illinois, where he at- 
tended the public schools. He also was graduated from 
Indiana Normal College, taught school for several years, 
having been granted a teacher's certificate by James 
Bingham, later attorney general of Illinois. Mr. Crayton 
taught for two years and then entered the office of the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1043 

"Potomac Rustler," of Potomac, Illinois, where he learned 
the printer's trade. He was connected with numerous 
publications, including the "Hillsboro Clipper," and the 
"Georgetown Herald." At the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American War he enlisted, April 20, 1898, in Battery A, 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry and served in Porto Rico. He 
was discharged November 28, 1898, and went as a reporter 
for the Danville "Daily Democrat." He shortly afterward 
purchased the "Potomac Republican," which he edited and 
sold in April, 1900. He then accepted the city editorship 
of "The Citizen," located at Poplar Bluff, Missouri. He 
resigned in July, 1902, to become editor of the "Potomac 
Republican." While serving there he studied law and in 
1906 was admitted to the Illinois State Bar. He estab- 
lished offices at Potomac, Illinois, but after two years 
removed to Danville, where he was appointed assistant 
state's attorney. He resigned from this office in October, 
1914, and formed a partnership with John M. Boyle, with 
offices in the First National Bank Building, the firm being- 
known as Crayton & Boyle. In July, 1917, Mr. Crayton 
was commissioned a first lieutenant in the Illinois National 
Guard. He resigned August 27, 1917, and entered the 
Second Officers Training Camp at Fort Sheridan, Illinois, 
where he was commissioned a second lieutenant in artil- 
lery. On November 27, 1917, he was ordered to France 
with his outfit and sailed on December 23rd. Upon his 
arrival in France he was sent to Samur, and attended a 
French field artillery school, as well as the motor school 
at Vincennes, France. Later, he was assigned to the Fifty- 
ninth Coast Artillery Corps. He participated in the Saint 
Mihiel offensive and served in France until January 22, 
1919. He was discharged February 14, 1919, and returned 
to Danville. 

In April, 1919, Mr. Crayton was elected assistant super- 
visor of Danville Township, and later resigned to accept 
the appointment of election commissioner of Danville for 



1044 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

two years. On February 19, 1923, he was appointed state 
superintendent of eighteen employment offices, located 
with headquarters at Danville. Mr. Crayton maintains his 
law offices in the First National Bank Building. 

August 11, 1901, Mr. Crayton married Miss Minnie B. 
Parker, of Potomac, Illinois, the daughter of A. M. and 
Elizabeth (Ather) Parker, the former a native of Ken- 
tucky and the latter of Vermilion County. He was justice 
of the peace at Danville and deputy sheriff of Vermilion 
County for a period of twenty-four years. Both he and 
his wife are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Crayton had the 
following children: Kathleen E., married Fred J. Burt, 
lives at Buffalo, New York, and they have a daughter, 
Elizabeth Crayton Burt; Lois G. and Mildred M., both at 
home ; and Maurice P., who died in 1923. 

Politically, Mr. Crayton is a Republican. He holds 
membership in the Christian Church, Loyal Order of 
Moose, United Spanish War Veterans, Veterans of For- 
eign Wars, and American Legion. He is identified with 
the Vermilion County Bar Association, Illinois State Bar 
Association, and American Bar Association. 



Lionel Martelle, who is city service supervisor for the 
Hoover Company, is among the active young business men 
of Danville. He is a veteran of the World War, having 
served in France with the Princess Pat regiment, Can- 
adian forces. Mr. Martelle was born in Paris, France, 
April 14, 1894, the son of Alexander and Millicent (Asche) 
Martelle. 

Alexander Martelle was born in Paris and his wife is 
a native of Cardiff, Wales. He is a graduate of Sorbonne 
University, Paris, and the University of Saint Petersburg, 
Russia, where he studied art. He was first violinist in the 
Paris Symphony Orchestra for many years and studied 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1045 

art with the celebrated Solomon J. Solomon, A. R. A. 
During the World War Mr. Martelle served as captain in 
the French army and was an interpreter. He is now con- 
ducting a studio in London, England. Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
telle have three children: Rose and Lillian, who live in 
London; and Lionel, the subject of this sketch. 

Lionel Martelle received his early education in Paris, 
and in 1908 was graduated from Rugby College, in Eng- 
land. Two years later he came to the United States and 
located at Los Angeles, California, where he spent a year 
with the Pathe Motion Picture Company as a camera man. 
In 1911 he entered vaudeville, and worked on the Keith, 
Proctor, Orpheum and Pantages circuit, his act being 
listed as Martelle & Company. On August 26, 1914, Mr. 
Martelle enlisted in the Princess Pat regiment, Canadian 
Light Infantry, and went to France with this outfit. He 
saw continuous active service at the front until August 
26, 1918, when he was severely wounded at the battle of 
Soissons. He spent many months in hospitals in France 
and England, and Toronto, Canada, and was discharged 
from the Sulphur Springs Military Hospital, Tampa, 
Florida, in March, 1922, with the rank of major. In 1919 
he was decorated by H. R. H. Prince of Wales at Toronto, 
Canada, receiving the Medaille Militaire. He has also 
received personal letters from King George V, Prince of 
Wales, and Princess Mary. 

Mr. Martelle returned to his profession in vaudeville 
in 1922 but on account of poor health was forced to aban- 
don this work. He returned to Los Angeles in 1924 as a 
motion picture camera man but later during that year 
went to Covington, Indiana. He came to Danville in 1925 
and the following year became identified with the Illinois 
Power & Light Company. Since 1928 he has been asso- 
ciated with the Hoover Company. 

In 1924 Mr. Martelle married Miss Lena B. Hollings- 
worth, of Covington, Indiana. 



1046 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Mr. Martelle is a Republican, a member of Saint James 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and belongs to the Masonic 
Lodge, thirty-second degree, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Loyal Order of Moose, and American Legion. He 
also belongs to the National Vaudeville Association and 
Society of American Magicians. 



Orla O. Kreager, who is well known in Hoopeston as 
the proprietor of the Hoopeston Hatchery, is a veteran of 
the World War. He was born at Gratiot, Licking County, 
Ohio, July 3, 1890, the son of Marion and Ida May (Fink) 
Kreager. 

Marion Kreager was born in Licking County, Ohio. He 
spent his early life on his father's farm and later became 
successful as a general merchant at Gratiot, Ohio. In 1905 
he removed to Hoopeston, where he was connected with 
the Grand Union Tea Company. He also had an interest 
in a mercantile business at Hoopeston for several years. 
Mr. Kreager removed to Lakeland, Florida, in 1919, where 
he now lives retired. He is a Democrat and a member of 
the Christian Church. His wife, also born in Licking 
County, Ohio, died in March, 1904, and is buried at Gratiot. 
Their children were: Orla 0., the subject of this sketch; 
Ira Owen, mention of whom is made below; and Leona, 
deceased. 

Ira Owen Kreager lost his life while in service during 
the World War. He was born at Gratiot, Ohio, March 5, 
1893. At the outbreak of the World War he enlisted in 
Company B, Three Hundred Fifty-eighth Infantry, Nine- 
tieth Division, and served with the rank of corporal. He 
was killed at the front and was the only soldier from 
Hoopeston to lose his life in active service. It is in his 
honor that the local American Legion Post is named. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1047 

Orla 0. Kreager attended the public schools of Gratiot. 
He has been a resident of Hoopeston since 1905, at which 
time his family located here. He was associated with the 
Sprague Manufacturing Company, now the Sprague-Cells 
Company, and later went with the Illinois Public Service 
Company. He enlisted August 23, 1917, for service in the 
World War, and served as a member of Company B, Third 
Illinois Regiment, National Guard, which was later made 
Company B, One Hundred Twenty-ninth Infantry, Thirty- 
third Division. Mr. Kreager saw active service in France 
and participated in the battle of Saint Mihiel and Meuse 
Argonne drive. He was discharged June 6, 1919, and upon 
his return to Hoopeston re-entered the employ of the Illi- 
nois Public Service Company. In 1921 Mr. Kreager 
became identified with the A. W. Murray Plumbing Com- 
pany, Hoopeston. Since 1926 he has been interested in the 
Hoopeston Hatchery as manager. 

In 1919 Mr. Kreager married Miss Evelyn Floyd. 

Politically Mr. Kreager is a Democrat. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church; Ira Owen Kreager Post No. 
384, American Legion; and Star Lodge No. 709, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons. 



Russell Iliff is perhaps one of the most prominent young 
business men of Hoopeston, where he is secretary and 
general manager of the Iliff-Bruff Chemical Company. He 
is a native of Chicago Heights, Illinois, born September 
29, 1900, the son of Ellsworth E. and Anna (Kohler) lliff. 

The sketch of Ellsworth E. Iliff, deceased, appears else- 
where in this history. 

After his graduation from Hoopeston High School in 
1922, Russell Iliff entered his father's factory. He was 
anxious to learn the business from the foundation and in 
1922 became an apprentice in the laboratory. Mr. Iliff 



1048 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

has continued in the business and has held the offices of 
secretary and general manager since the death of his 
father in November, 1928. 

Mr. Iliff married in 1925 Miss Florence Lottinville, the 
daughter of George and Louise (Schroeder) Lottinville, 
natives of Martinton, Illinois, and now residents of Kemp- 
ton, Illinois, where Mr. Lottinville is a hardware mer- 
chant. Mr. and Mrs. Iliff have a daughter, Eloise Ann, 
born in 1926. 

Mr. Iliff is a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Church, and is affiliated with Star Lodge No. 709, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons; Hoopeston Chapter, No. 181, 
Royal Arch Masons. 



Ellsworth E. Iliff, who died November 29, 1928, was a 
prominent business man and highly esteemed citizen of 
Hoopeston, where he was one of the founders of the Iliff - 
Bruff Chemical Company. He was born at Lincoln, 
Nebraska, October 8, 1872, the son of Fred Iliff. 

Fred Iliff was born in Indiana and early in life removed 
to Nebraska, where he engaged in general farming. He 
also conducted a livery business at Lincoln. He is deceased. 

Ellsworth E. Iliff spent his boyhood at Rensselaer, 
Indiana, and was educated in the public schools. He was 
also a graduate of Lafayette Business College. After 
leaving school he spent three years as a telegraph oper- 
ator in the employ of the Monon Railroad. He then went 
to Chicago Heights, Illinois, where he was identified with 
the Victor Chemical Works. He resigned in 1914 as super- 
intendent of the plant and at that time, in partnership 
with C. M. Bruff, organized the Iliff-Bruff Chemical Com- 
pany at Hoopeston. They are manufacturers of Mono 
Calcium Phosphate. At the time of his death Mr. Iliff was 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1049 

president of this concern. He is buried in Floral Hill 
Cemetery, Hoopeston. 

Mr. Iliff married Miss Anna Kohler, the daughter of 
John and Catherine (Minicus) Kohler, the former a native 
of Illinois and the latter of Indiana. Mr. Kohler died in 
1920. His widow lives at Hoopeston. To. Mr. and Mrs. 
Iliff were born three children : Marie, lives at home ; Don- 
ald, deceased; and Russell, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this history. 

Mr. Oliff was always a Republican. He was a member of 
Chicago Heights Lodge, No. 851, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Illinois Athletic 
Club; Hubbard Trail Country Club; Commercial Club; and 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Iliff was a home loving man and very popular in 
the city of Hoopeston. 



The Hiff-Rruff Chemical Company. — The magic of one 
of the world's oldest and most interesting professions 
enters into the products of the Iliff-Bruff Chemical Com- 
pany, established in Hoopeston in the year 1915 by Ells- 
worth Iliff and Milton C. Bruff. 

"Snow White Phosphate," that in turn goes into the 
make-up of a thousand products of food is manufactured 
in wholesale quantities by The Iliff-Bruff Company, con- 
sidered as one of Hoopeston's most substantial and grow- 
ing major industrial enterprises. 

Other products of the field of chemistry are also manu- 
factured by The Iliff-Bruff Company, which each year 
since its establishment in Hoopeston, has taken a step for- 
ward in the ranks of such industries in the entire nation. 

Plans of the company in the future to utilize the waste 
material from the making of Snow White Phosphate, by 



1050 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

the manufacture of chemical by-products, announced early 
in the year 1925, are going forward at the present time. 
In the test laboratory of the plant, experiments are going 
forward that are expected to culminate in the placing of 
other products on the world market by The Iliff-Bruff 
Company in quantities that will further associate their 
name with those of the leaders in the chemical industry of 
the nation. 

The Iliff-Bruff is considered among the most progres- 
sive of Hoopeston's industrial concerns, affording employ- 
ment to many men that are well paid the year around. 

The scientific nature of the chemical industry makes 
any description of the processes and products manufac- 
tured impossible to any person except a chemist, and there- 
fore none is attempted. 



Cecil K. Reed ranks high among the progressive young 
business men of Hoopeston, where he is proprietor of the 
Shell Service Station, located on the Dixie Highway at 
West Main Street. He is a native of Vermilion County, 
born at Cheneyville, August 26, 1907, the son of Charles 
D. and Orphia (Troxell) Reed. 

Charles D. Reed and his wife are natives of Indiana. 
They are now residents of Cheneyville, where Mr. Reed 
is identified with C. C. Harlam & Company, grain dealers. 
Formerly, they lived in Indiana, where Mr. Reed engaged 
in general farming. They located at Cheneyville in 1907. 
Mr. Reed is a Republican, a member of the Christian 
Church, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Modern 
Woodmen of America. The following children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Reed: Clifford, Cecil, Herbert, Russell, 
Ernest, Charles, Delmar, LeRoy, Vernel, Hazel, Zelda, 
Marjorie, and Norma Jean. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1051 

Cecil K. Reed received his education in the public 
schools of Cheneyville. For a time he was employed on 
the Illinois State Highway and engaged in road building 
in Vermilion County. He later went with the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & Saint Paul Railroad, and then with the 
Sprague-Sells Company, of Hoopeston. On April 3, 1929, 
he took over the management of the Shell Service Station. 
Mr. Reed operates one of the city's popular service sta- 
tions and has a well established trade. 

Mr. Reed is a Republican in politics. He is a member 
of the Christian Church and Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. He is unmarried. 



Daniel A. Miller, who is successfully engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business at Hoopeston, is a lead- 
ing citizen of Vermilion County. He was born at Reading, 
Pennsylvania, October 9, 1878, the son of Sebastian H. and 
Hannah (Miller) Miller. 

Sebastian H. Miller was a veteran of the Civil War, 
having served with Company G, Eighth Illinois Cavalry. 
He was a native of Reading, Pennsylvania, and in 1849 
started to California during the gold rush. However, he 
stopped at Chicago, and soon located at Rossville, where 
he became a successful farmer. He died in 1903 and his 
wife died in 1908. Both are buried at Rossville. Mr. Mil- 
ler was a Republican, a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, and Grand Army of the Republic. Three children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Miller: Harry, lives on the old 
homestead at Rossville, Illinois; Ellen, deceased; and 
Daniel A., the subject of this sketch. 

Daniel A. Miller spent his boyhood at Rossville and 
received his education in the public schools there. He fol- 
lowed general farming until 1902, at which time he entered 
the store of McConnell & Wilbur as a clerk. Two years 



1052 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

later he became associated with James Reed, and in 1907 
came to Hoopeston as assistant manager of the Hoopeston 
Department Store. Mr. Miller resigned in 1922 and at 
that time established a retail shoe business at 223 East 
Main Street, which he successfully conducted until 1927. 
He then sold the store and has since devoted his entire 
time to the real estate and insurance business, making a 
specialty of farm loans. 

In 1901 Mr. Miller was united in marriage with Miss 
Janet M. Miller, the daughter of Charles and Eliza Jane 
Miller, natives of Indiana. Charles Miller is deceased and 
his widow lives at Hoopeston. To Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. 
Miller have been born four children: Lawrence R., lives 
at Detroit, Michigan, married Lucia Hall, and they have a 
son, Lawrence; Grace M., married Glenn Hawkins, lives 
at Hoopeston, and they have a son, Millard; Alan, lives at 
Detroit, Michigan, married Josephine Mugg; and Daniel 
A., Jr., a student. 

Mr. Miller is a Republican and is serving his second 
term as supervisor of Grant Township. He is a member 
of the Methodist Church, and belongs to Star Lodge No. 
709, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Hoopeston Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons, No. 181; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Ansar Temple; and Modern Wood- 
men of America. 



William T. Henderson. — One of the most influential 
figures in professional circles in Vermilion County is Wil- 
liam T. Henderson, who is serving as county judge. He 
is a native of Vermilion County, born at Georgetown, 
March 5, 1885, the son of John T. and Sarah Belle (Ben- 
nett) Henderson. 

John T. Henderson was born at Georgetown, Illinois, 
in 1855, and died November 1, 1927. He is buried at the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1053 

place of his birth. His widow, born at Maysville, Illinois, 
resides at Georgetown. Mr. Henderson was a farmer in 
early life and in 1885 became interested in the general 
mercantile business at Georgetown. He later sold his 
interests there in 1925 and retired. Mr. Henderson was 
a Republican and for many years was a member of the 
local school board. He held membership in the Methodist 
Church and Knights of Pythias. There were eight chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. Henderson, as follows: Oscar, 
lives at Portland, Oregon; Otis, lives at Georgetown, Illi- 
nois; William T., the subject of this sketch; Hon. Wilbur, 
who is serving his second term as a member of the Oregon 
State Legislature; John T., merchant, lives at Portland, 
Oregon; Joseph, born in 1890, died in 1896; Bennett F., 
postmaster, lives at Georgetown, Illinois; and Olive, lives 
at home. Wilbur, John, and Bennett Henderson are vet- 
erans of the World War. 

John T. Henderson was the son of William and Mary 
(Black) Henderson. He was born in Vermilion Grove, 
Illinois, and died in 1908. His wife, who died in 1890, was 
also a native of Vermilion County. He was a farmer and 
in 1885 became interested in the mercantile business with 
his son. William Henderson was the son of Nathaniel 
Henderson, who was born at Henderson, North Carolina, 
and who came to Vermilion Grove in 1822. He was a 
cabinet maker by trade and also a millwright. He con- 
ducted a flour mill at Danville, on South Street, for many 
years. He also owned and operated the "Old Wheel" mill, 
located at Grape Creek, and known as the Henderson- 
Kyger Mills. He died in 1895 and is buried in Greenwood 
Cemetery, Danville. He was one of the pioneers of Ver- 
milion County and was numbered among the successful 
business men of Danville. 

William T. Henderson, the subject of this sketch, grew 
up at Georgetown, where he received his early education. 
He attended Illinois Normal School, spent two years at 



1054 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Cornell College, and two years at the University of Illi- 
nois. He then taught school. He was admitted to the 
Illinois State Bar on October 18, 1910, and on January 1, 
1911, became a member of the firm of Fleming & Hender- 
son, Danville. Mr. Henderson served as city attorney of 
Georgetown for ten years and in April, 1925, was elected 
judge of Vermilion County. 

In 1913 Mr. Henderson married Miss Ethel Spang, the 
daughter of C. B. and Ada (Phillips) Spang, of Butler, 
Pennsylvania, both now deceased. He died June 17, 1928, 
and his wife died in 1899. Two children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Henderson : Ada Jane and Joseph William, both 
students. 

Mr. Henderson is a Republican, a member of the Meth- 
odist Church, and has the following club affiliations : Rus- 
sell Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, No. 154, Past Mas- 
ter, 1918; Danville Consistory, thirty-second degree; Gao 
Grotto; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332; 
Kiwanis Club; and Chamber of Commerce. He is identi- 
fied with the Vermilion County Bar Association, Illinois 
State Bar Association, and American Bar Association. He 
is also an active member of the Vermilion County Farm 
Bureau. 



P. Keith Andrews, M. D. — Numbered among the lead- 
ing physicians and surgeons of Vermilion County may be 
mentioned Doctor Andrews, who is successfully engaged 
in the practice of his profession in Danville, with offices 
at 5 Illinois Street. He was born at Clinton, Indiana, De- 
cember 20, 1882, the son of Joseph F. and Martha J. (Fouts) 
Andrews. 

Joseph F. Andrews was born at Saint Bernice, Ver- 
million County, Indiana, in 1855, the son of William and 
Lucy Andrews, natives of Pennsylvania and pioneer set- 
tlers of Indiana. Both William Andrews and his wife are 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1055 

buried on the old homestead near Clinton, Indiana. Their 
son, Joseph F., followed farming on the home place until 
his marriage. He then located at Clinton, Indiana, and 
purchased a grocery store, which he successfully operated 
in connection with a hardware and implement business. 
He sold his interests in 1909 and until 1919 was a travel- 
ing representative, having removed to Chicago in 1909. 
He died in that city in 1921 and is buried in Oakwood 
Cemetery, Chicago. His widow, born at Indianapolis, In- 
diana, lives in Danville. She is the daughter of Samuel 
and Nancy Fouts. Mr. Fouts, a native of Indiana, was a 
prominent lumber dealer in Indianapolis for many years 
and also had business interests at Terre Haute, Indiana. 
Mr. Andrews was a Republican, a member of the Meth- 
odist Church, and belonged to the Knights of Pythias and 
Modern Woodmen of America. To Joseph F. and Martha 
J. (Fouts) Andrews were born two children: P. Keith, 
the subject of this sketch; and Blanche, married L. C. 
Casey, lives in Chicago, Illinois. 

Following his graduation from Clinton (Indiana) High 
School in 1901, P. Keith Andrews attended Loyola Medi- 
cal College, from which he received the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1907. He began his practice at Atwood, 
Indiana, and in 1909 removed to Hindsboro, Illinois, where 
he was located until 1917. He then practiced at Ashmore, 
Illinois, until the time of his enlistment for service in the 
World War in 1918. Doctor Andrews served at Fort Riley, 
Kansas, as a first lieutenant in the United States Medical 
Corps. He was discharged in December, 1918, and re- 
sumed his practice at Ashmore, Illinois, until 1925, at 
which time he came to Danville. Doctor Andrews was 
appointed physician of Vermilion County in 1926 and is 
still serving in that capacity. He held that office in Coles 
County, Illinois. He is identified with the Vermilion 
County Medical Society, Illinois State Medical Society, and 
American Medical Association. 



1056 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

In 1913 Doctor Andrews married Miss Ellen Elizabeth 
Reeds, daughter of F. N. Reeds, of Illinois. He died in 
1923 and his wife died in 1925. Both are buried at Hinds- 
boro, Illinois. Doctor and Mrs. Andrews have no children. 

Doctor Andrews is a Republican, a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church, and belongs to Further Light Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Danville Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Gao Grotto; Modern Woodmen of 
America; Tau Alpha Epsilon fraternity; and American 
Legion. 

Doctor Andrews has a wide acquaintance in the com- 
munity and has already established an excellent practice 
in Danville. 



Ernest A. Church, who is superintendent of the Ver- 
milion County Home, near Danville, has spent his entire 
life in this section and is a member of one of the oldest 
families in Vermilion County. He was born at Catlin, 
September 21, 1862, the son of George William F. and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Jones) Church. 

George William F. Church was born in England. At 
the age of nineteen years he came to the United States 
and spent one year at Rochester, New York, before locat- 
ing at Catlin. He was one of the first settlers of Catlin 
Township and for more than half a century farmed a tract 
of three hundred and eighty acres. He retired in 1887 and 
located at Danville, where he died in 1914. His wife, also 
born in England, died in 1887. Both are buried at Catlin. 
Mrs. Church was twenty-three years old when she came 
to this country with her parents and settled at Catlin. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Church were born eight children, as follows: 
Elizabeth, married Richard Puzey, both deceased; Henry 
G., lives on the old homestead in Catlin Township; Fred; 
Walter, deceased; Minnie L., married Peyton F. Douglas, 
both deceased; Ernest A., the subject of this sketch; 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1057 

Maude L, married George M. Brady, deceased, and she 
lives at Catlin; and Ethel, married Clay Bumpus, lives at 
Danville. Mr. Church was a Republican and served as 
school director and treasurer for many years. He was 
a member of the Episcopal Church and Catlin Lodge, 
No. 285, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

Ernest A. Church received his education in the public 
schools of Catlin and spent his boyhood on his father's 
farm. After his marriage he purchased a farm of one 
hundred and thirty-six acres in Catlin Township, which 
he operated until the time of his appointment as superin- 
tendent of the Vermilion County Home in 1920. Prior to 
that time he had also engaged in the meat business at 
Catlin. In his management of the County Home, Mr. 
Church has proven his capability and executive ability, 
and he is recognized as one of the most efficient superin- 
tendents of the State. 

On July 2, 1889, Mr. Church married Miss Anna V. 
Frazier, the daughter of John W. and Mary Frazier, 
natives of Illinois, both now deceased. They have a daugh- 
ter, Helen V., who is the wife of William Muriel Fulrath, 
of Peoria, Illinois. They have two children, Richard and 
David. 

Mr. Church is a Republican and has served as highway 
commissioner. 



L. V. Chaffee. — A substantial citizen and enterprising 
and dependable business man of Danville is found in L. V. 
Chaffee, who is president of Peyton-Palmer Company, 
wholesale grocers. He is a native of Illinois, born in Law- 
rence County, December 13, 1851, the son of Leonard and 
Ellen F. (McNece) Chaffee. 

Leonard Chaffee was born in Lawrence County, Illi- 
nois. He died about 1851. Mr. Chaffee was a miller by 
trade. His widow died in 1908 and is buried at Palestine, 

33— Vol. 2 



1058 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Illinois. Two sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Chaffee: 
L. V., the subject of this sketch; and Evander, deceased. 
By a second marriage Mrs. Chaffee was the mother of 
three children: Allen M. and Harlan H. Haskett, both 
deceased; and Mrs. W. 0. Richey, who lives at Palestine, 
Illinois. 

L. V. Chaffee spent his boyhood at Palestine, Illinois, 
and was educated in the public schools. He has been inter- 
ested in the wholesale grocery business at Danville con- 
tinuously since 1883 and for the past fifteen years has 
been identified with the Peyton Palmer Company as 
president. 

On November 13, 1878, Mr. Chaffee married Miss Maria 
J. Wood, a native of Clay County, Illinois. They have no 
children. 

Politically, Mr. Chaffee is a Republican. He has served 
as assistant county supervisor and as a member of the 
city council. He is a member of the First Church of 
Christ and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and Knights of Pythias. 

One of the outstanding events to take place in the city 
of Danville during 1929 was the unusual gift presented by 
Mr. Chaffee to the First Church of Christ Congregation. 
He presented the First Church of Christ building, located 
at Oak and Seminary streets, as a tribute to the memory 
of his mother, who for many years was an active member 
of the church. The gift was made as a complete surprise 
to the congregation. An excerpt from Mr. Chaffee's let- 
ter, giving the church building to the church, follows: "In 
making this gift I desire to do so in memory of a wonder- 
fully good woman — a woman who prior to her death was 
an earnest and consistent member of this particular church 
organization for more than fifty years — a woman who 
stood very high in the community in which she lived, was 
a good Samaritan to many families in the town and com- 
munity, was always ready and willing to go forth on any 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1059 

mission of mercy, and to comfort and console the unfor- 
tunate, and to uplift those who had fallen. In making 
this gift of five thousand dollars to the First Church of 
Christ I do so in memory of that good woman — who was 
my mother." 



James A. Harlam is one of the most popular business 
men of Cheneyville, where he is identified with the grain 
interests of C. C. Harlam & Company. He was born at 
Washington, Tazewell County, Illinois, October 8, 1867, the 
son of James Newton and Margaret Ann (Andrews) 
Harlam. 

James Newton Harlam was born in Kentucky and his 
wife was a native of Ohio. He was a traveling salesman 
for many years and later in life engaged in the grain busi- 
ness in Woodford County, Illinois. He died in 1893 and 
his wife died in 1925. Both are buried in Floral Hill Ceme- 
tery, Hoopeston. Mr. Harlam was a Republican, an active 
member of the Presbyterian Church, and belonged to the 
Masonic Lodge. To Mr. and Mrs. Harlam were born five 
children: Lulu, deceased; Minnie, married E. 0. Eyman, 
lives at Oak Park, Illinois; James A., the subject of this 
sketch; Charles, lives at Kentland, Indiana, is interested 
in the grain business with C. C. Harlam & Company; and 
Carrie, married H. D. Pruit, lives at Hoopeston. 

James A. Harlam was educated in the public schools of 
Eureka, Illinois, and attended Eureka College. He was a 
teacher in the schools of Woodford County for several 
terms and then became interested in the grain business 
with his father. After two years he formed a partner- 
ship with his brother, Charles C, the business being known 
as C. C. Harlam & Company. They began business at 
Goodfield, Illinois, later purchased an elevator at Crescent 
City, Illinois, and subsequently located at Ambia, Indiana. 
James A. Harlam operated and managed the elevator at 



1060 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Ambia until 1911 when he assumed management of the 
elevator at Cheneyville. His brother is now in charge of 
the branch at Kentland, Indiana. Mr. Harlam maintains 
his residence at 518 East Lincoln Street, Hoopeston. 

Mr. Harlam was married first in 1900 to Miss Bertha 
Miller, the daughter of A. C. and Cecelia (Townsend) Mil- 
ler, natives of Indiana, now residents of Crescent, Illinois. 
Mrs. Harlam died in 1911 and is survived by one daughter, 
Margaret, who attends the University of Illinois. In 1913 
Mr. Harlam married Mabel Love, the daughter of James 
and Grace Love. The former is deceased and the latter 
lives at Hoopeston. Mabel (Love) Harlam died in 1918. 
Mr. Harlam was married the third time in 1925 to Bess 
Johnston, of Hoopeston. 

Mr. Harlam is a Republican and has served as alder- 
man of the Second Ward, Hoopeston, continuously since 
1922. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and is 
affiliated with Star Lodge No. 709, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is a member of the Illinois Grain Dealers Association 
and the National Grain Dealers Association. 



Roy Melloy Montfort, M. D., is one of the best known 
of the younger physician and surgeons of Vermilion 
County, engaged in the practice of his profession at Dan- 
ville, with offices at 312 Temple Building. He was born at 
Galien, Michigan, July 11, 1889, the son of Frank and 
Mina (Mudge) Montfort. 

Both Frank Montfort and his wife were born near 
Toronto, Canada. He died in 1889 and she lives at Benton 
Harbor, Michigan. They had two sons: Louis B., attor- 
ney, lives at Washington, District of Columbia. He is a 
veteran of the World War, having organized the Three 
Hundred and Sixtieth Air Squadron at Kelly Field, San 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1061 

Antonio, Texas. He was later transferred to Washington, 
District of Columbia, and served with the rank of captain. 
Following the close of the war Mr. Montfort remained in 
Washington for five years with the Department of Justice. 
(2) Roy Melloy, the subject of this sketch. 

Roy Melloy Montfort was educated in the public schools 
of Benton Harbor, Michigan, and after his graduation 
from high school in 1909 he entered Michigan State Col- 
lege, where he remained for two years. He then attended 
Ferris Institute, for a course in pharmacy, passing State 
Board of Michigan, obtaining Registered Pharmacist 
degree, and in 1915 was graduated from Loyola Univer- 
sity, Chicago, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He 
served as interne at Saint Elizabeth's Hospital, Danville, 
during 1915 and 1916 and in January, 1917, established 
offices at Fairchild and Bowman Avenue and in the Temple 
Building. On July 11, 1917, Doctor Montfort volunteered 
for service in the World War and received the rank of first 
lieutenant, Medical Corps. He served as tubercular spe- 
cialist at Fort Benjamin Harrison, and was later trans- 
ferred to Camp Sherman, Ohio, Camp Greenleaf, Georgia, 
and Camp Colt, Pennsylvania, where he served in the same 
capacity until the close of the war. He was attached to 
the Second Gas Regiment, Camp Kendrick, New Jersey, at 
the termination of the war. He also studied at the Camp 
Greenleaf School of Internal Medicine and Lung Diseases. 
Upon his return to Danville, Doctor Montfort resumed his 
practice at 312 Temple Building. He served as tubercular 
specialist for the Veterans' Bureau for two years. 

On July 6, 1927, Doctor Montfort was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Harriet Smith, the daughter of Marion 
and Ella Mae (Harris) Smith, of Gibson City, Illinois, and 
natives of Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have three chil- 
dren: Harriet Montfort; Eva Mae, married Claire Bishop, 
lives at Piper City, Illinois; and Virginia, married Watson 
McKee, lives at Piper City, Illinois. 



1062 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Politically, Doctor Montfort is a Republican. He holds 
membership in the Methodist Church, and has the follow- 
ing lodge affiliations : Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
Olive Branch Lodge No. 38; Bloomsburg Consistory, 
thirty-second degree; Almas Temple, Washington, District 
of Columbia; Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
No. 332; and American Legion. He is a member of the 
Vermilion County Medical Society, Illinois State Medical 
Society, and American Medical Association. 



Edward M. Raimer is perhaps one of the best known 
of the younger business men of Danville, where he is asso- 
ciated with the Raimer Realty Developing Company. He 
is a native of this city, born February 19, 1901, the son of 
Edward I. and Millie (McKee) Raimer. 

Edward I. Raimer, deceased, was a leading citizen of 
Danville for many years. He was born in Danville, where 
he spent his entire life. He was a manufacturing chemist 
and was one of the organizers of the Raimer & Heinley 
Company, later also organizing the Raimer Realty Devel- 
oping Company in 1901. He was identified with both of 
these organizations until the time of his death in 1924. 
He is buried in Springhill Cemetery, Danville. His widow 
lives in this city. Mr. Raimer was a Republican, a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, No. 332, and Loyal Order of Moose. Four 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Raimer: John McKee, 
lives at Long Beach, California; Edward M., the subject 
of this sketch; Mack McKee, lives at Brooklyn, New York; 
and Amelia, lives at Danville. 

Edward M. Raimer obtained his early schooling at Dan- 
ville, was graduated in 1921 from Saint John's Military 
Academy, and then attended the University of Illinois. 
He has since been identified with the interests of the 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1063 

Raimer Realty Developing Company and is responsible for 
the opening of the following sub-divisions of Danville's 
suburban area: Millie Raimer; Raimer's Orchard Hill 
Addition; Raimer's Orchard Hill Second Addition; Raim- 
er's Orchard Hill Third Addition; and Rose Lawn Heights. 
Mr. Raimer is especially interested in the planning and 
designing of homes to be built in these attractive sub- 
divisions and carries out his own ideas in the development 
of these additions. 

In 1927 Mr. Raimer married Miss Elizabeth Swaim, 
the daughter of Will and Olive (Erickson) Swaim. The 
former is deceased and the latter lives at Danville. 

Mr. Raimer is a Republican, a member of Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, No. 332, Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon fraternity, Kiwanis Club, Danville Country Club, and 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Harvey C. Adams. — A man of varied activities in busi- 
ness and public life is Harvey C. Adams, who is president 
of the Danville Brick Company. He was born in Cass 
County, Indiana, February 2, 1870, the son of Lewis and 
Hannah (Schuman) Adams. 

Lewis Adams was born in Preble County, Ohio, in 1829. 
He was a well known merchant at Galveston, Indiana, for 
many years and in 1876 removed to Crawford County, Illi- 
nois, where he engaged in farming on LaMotte Prairie, 
later removing to Hutsonville, Illinois, where he lived re- 
tired. He died in 1903 and his wife, also a native of Ohio, 
died in 1918. They are buried at Hutsonville. Their chil- 
dren were: Frank R., Mrs. Sarah Doggalt, Lorena, 
Crowell, and Belle, all deceased; Mrs. Emma Bishop lives 
at Danville; Mrs. Anna Holderman, lives at Hutsonville, 
Illinois; and Harvey C, the subject of this sketch. 



1064 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

Harvey C. Adams attended the public schools of Hut- 
sonville, Valparaiso Normal School, and George Washing- 
ton University, being graduated from the latter institution 
with the L. L. B. degree in 1892. He was employed as 
stenographer and court reporter at Robinson, Illinois, for 
Crawford County. Later he was a government employe in 
Washington, District of Columbia, connected with the 
Treasury Department, and was subsequently attached to 
the civil service commission and postal department. At 
that time Theodore Roosevelt was one of the commission 
and Mr. Adams was his secretary for a short time, and 
knew him well. Mr. Adams later served as secretary to 
Judge Jacob W. Wilkin of the Illinois Supreme Court, re- 
maining in that capacity for eleven years. He then be- 
came interested in real estate in Danville and in 1905 was 
appointed secretary of the Vermilion County Building & 
Loan Association. At the time of the organization of the 
Danville Brick Company he became its president. 

In 1892 Mr. Adams married Miss Blanche Meserve, of 
Crawford County, Illinois, the daughter of Dr. Stephen D. 
and Martha (Barlow) Meserve, the former a native of New 
Hampshire and the latter of Illinois. Doctor Meserve was 
a well known physician of Hutsonville, where he engaged 
in practice for over sixty years. Mr. and Mrs. Adams have 
a son, Stephen M. He is a graduate of DePauw University. 
He is vice president of the Danville Brick Company and 
assistant cashier of the Vermilion County Building Asso- 
ciation. He married Alice Bishop. 

Politically Mr. Adams is identified with the Republican 
party. During the World War he was chairman of the 
local board, serving without pay, and also chairman of the 
Red Cross for Vermilion County. He is a charter mem- 
ber of the Rotary Club and is affiliated with the Masonic 
Lodge, thirty-second degree, Elks Club, Chamber of Com- 
merce, Danville Country Club, and Yacht Club. 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1065 

Paul H. Fithian, M. D. — An experienced physician and 
public spirited citizen, Dr. Paul H. Fithian is numbered 
among the representative men of Vermilion County, and 
is a member of the first family of Fithian. He was born at 
Fithian, July 4, 1866, the son of E. C. B. and Anna M. 
(Hayes) Fithian. 

E. C. B. Fithian was born at Danville, Illinois, in 1837. 
He was eighteen years old when he went to Georgetown, 
Illinois, from Danville. Later, he operated a farm for his 
father and lived south of Fithian during the greater part 
of his life. He retired in 1908 and lived at Fithian until the 
time of his death, November 17, 1908. The Fithian family 
was among the earliest families to settle in this section of 
Vermilion County and were highly esteemed citizens. They 
were identified with the Methodist Church. Mr. Fithian 
was a Republican. Anna M. (Hayes) Fithian, a native of 
Athens County, Ohio, born March 15, 1840, died June 26, 
1916. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fithian are buried in Stearns 
Cemetery, Fithian. Their children were: Paul H., the 
subject of this sketch ; Lila R., born June 30, 1868, lives at 
Fithian; E. C. B., born January 4, 1870, lives on the old 
homestead near Fithian; Charles, born January 23, 1871; 
and David W., born December 11, 1874, dentist, lives at 
Rossville. 

Paul H. Fithian attended the district schools and the 
public schools of Danville. He was graduated from Keo- 
kuk College in 1890 and received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from Rush Medical College, Chicago. Doctor 
Fithian was then identified with the Wabash Railroad Hos- 
pital at Springfield, Illinois, until 1899, at which time he 
returned to Fithian and engaged in private practice. He 
has achieved marked success in his profession and has a 
well established practice. 

On October 14, 1897, Doctor Fithian was united in mar- 
riage with Cora (Humphrey) Jewell, of Springfield, Illi- 
nois, the daughter of Cornelius and Margaret Humphrey, 



1066 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

natives of Indiana, both now deceased. Doctor and Mrs. 
Fithian have no children. 

Doctor Fithian is identified with the Republican party 
in politics, is a member of the Methodist Church, and 
belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Decatur 
Lodge, Danville Consistory, and Modern Woodmen of 
America. He has served continuously as a member of the 
local school board since 1901. 

Doctor Fithian is the owner of a fine farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty-five acres south of Fithian. 



John M. Hickman, M. D. — One of the leading physicians 
and surgeons of Vermilion County, is Doctor Hickman, 
who has engaged in the practice of his profession at West- 
ville since 1896. He was born at Nelsonville, Ohio, May 4, 
1872, the son of W. C. and Catherine J. (Hunt) Hickman. 

W. C. Hickman was born at Somerset, Ohio, December 
30, 1832, and his wife was born at New Lexington, Ohio, 
in 1845. He was a printer by trade and served throughout 
the Civil War as a member of Company I, Fifth Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He later engaged in the drug business 
at Nelsonville, Ohio, and subsequently read law. He was 
admitted to the Ohio state bar and served as mayor, coro- 
ner, and justice of the peace at Nelsonville. Mr. Hickman 
died November 10, 1898, and his wife died May 10, 1912. 
Both are buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Nelsonville, Ohio. 
Mr. Hickman was a Republican, a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and Masonic Lodge. There were three 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hickman: Paul, born in 
1867, died in 1888; Kate, married George Tannehill, lives 
at Lancaster, Ohio; and John M., the subject of this sketch. 

John M. Hickman received his early education in the 
public schools of Nelsonville, Ohio, and after his gradua- 
tion from high school in 1900 he became a clerk in a Nelson- 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1067 

ville drug store. He subsequently entered the Ohio College 
of Medicine, from which he received the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1896. Since that time Doctor Hickman has 
carried on an extensive practice at Westville. He is identi- 
fied with the Vermilion County Medical Society, Illinois 
State Medical Society, and American Medical Association. 

In 1900 Doctor Hickman was united in marriage with 
Miss Mabel Brown, the daughter of Benjamin and Lydia 
(Dolan) Brown, natives of Lafayette, Indiana. Mr. Brown 
is deceased. His widow lives at Danville, Illinois. To 
Doctor and Mrs. Hickman were born three children : John 
Wesley, born in 1906, a graduate of the University of Illi- 
nois, associated with Paul H. Davis & Company, Chicago, 
Illinois; Helen Harriet, attends Stevens College, Columbia, 
Missouri; and Robert, born November 24, 1915. 

Politically, Doctor Hickman is a Republican. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is 
affiliated with Georgetown Lodge No. 154, Ancient Free & 
Accepted Masons; and Danville Consistory, thirty-second 
degree. 



Dr. Taylor W. Funkhouser, physician and surgeon, is 
among the able professional men of Danville, and is a 
veteran of the World War. He was born at Mattoon, Illi- 
nois, January 26, 1890, the son of Charles B. and Elizabeth 
(Chaney) Funkhouser. 

Charles B. Funkhouser, who lives retired on a farm 
near Mattoon, Illinois, is a native of that section of Illinois. 
His wife was born near London, England. Mr. Funk- 
houser followed farming and stock raising throughout his 
active career and has lived retired since 1914. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Funkhouser the following children were born: 
Flora S., unmarried, lives at home; Dr. James Lee, physi- 
cian, lives at Danville ; Charles, died in infancy ; Dr. Oscar 
B., physician, lives in Chicago, Illinois; Fern lives in Chi- 



1068 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

cago; Taylor W., the subject of this sketch; Tracy, farmer, 
lives at Mattoon, Illinois; Paul, who was killed in an auto- 
mobile accident in 1917; Syble Jane, married Roscoe 
Hampton, director of athletics, Evanston (Illinois) High 
School; and Orville, superintendent of schools, Xenia, 
Illinois. 

Taylor W. Funkhouser received his early education in 
the schools of Mattoon, Illinois, and attended Eastern Illi- 
nois State Normal School, now the Eastern Illinois Teach- 
ers College. He was graduated from that institution in 
1909 and in that year entered the University of Chicago, 
from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in 1912. He then taught school at Jamesville, Minnesota, 
for one year, after which he matriculated at Rush Medical 
College, Chicago. After a year in the School of Medicine 
he again taught in the high school at Paxton, Illinois, for 
one year, and returned to Rush Medical College the follow- 
ing year. He received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1916 and spent the following two years at the Cook County 
Infirmary, Oak Forest, Illinois. He was then commis- 
sioned as first lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps and 
attached to the Base Hospital at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, 
where he remained on duty during the remainder of the 
war period. After his discharge from the service in Jan- 
uary, 1919, Doctor Funkhouser entered Lutheran Dea- 
coness Hospital, Chicago, as resident physician and sur- 
geon and served in that capacity from April 20, 1919, until 
August 20, 1919. He then established his present practice 
at Danville with offices at 126 Warrington Avenue. In 
1925 Doctor Funkhouser assumed the practice of Dr. Theo- 
dore Reagan, who removed to California. He has offices 
in the Temple Building. Doctor Funkhouser is a member 
of the staffs of Saint Elizabeth's and Lakeview Hospitals, 
Danville. 

On August 19, 1924, Doctor Funkhouser was united in 
marriage with Miss Hilda Funk, of Danville, the daughter 



HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 1069 

of Emory and Dimmis (Webb) Funk, natives of Effingham, 
Illinois, now residents of Danville. Doctor and Mrs. Funk- 
houser have a daughter, Marion Louise, born in 1926. 

Doctor Funkhouser is a Republican, attends the Metho- 
dist Church, and is affiliated with Olive Branch Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Danville Consistory, 
Gao Grotto, Loyal Order of Moose, American Legion, and 
Roselawn Country Club. He also holds membership in the 
Vermilion County Medical Society, Illinois State Medical 
Society, and American Medical Association. 



John Thomas Prather, deceased, was numbered among 
the substantial and well known men of Rossville. He was 
born near Danville, the son of William and Mary (Bow- 
man) Prather. 

William Prather, a native of Kentucky, died in 1881. 
His wife was born in Danville and is also deceased. 

John Thomas Prather was a farmer and spent his ac- 
tive life on a farm east of Rossville. At the time of his 
death in 1902 he was living retired at Rossville. He was 
married on December 30, 1879, to Miss Rebecca E. Norton, 
who was born at State Line, Indiana, June 14, 1856, the 
daughter of Ichabod and Elizabeth (French) Norton. 

Ichabod Norton was born at Augusta, Me., and his wife 
was a native of Virginia. He was a cooper in early life and 
later engaged in general farming. He lived at Rossville 
for many years and died there in 1878. His wife died in 
1905. Both are buried at Lebanon, Indiana. Their chil- 
dren were : Zermiah, the widow of John Ross, who died in 
1928, and she lives at Portland, Oregon.; Rebecca E. Pra- 
ther; and Elizabeth, the widow of Hiram Johnson, who 
died in February, 1929, and she lives at Portland, Oregon. 

To John Thomas and Rebecca E. (Norton) Prather 
were born four children: 1. Bert Ray, a graduate of Ross- 



1070 HISTORY OF VERMILION COUNTY 

ville High School, class of 1902, at present associated with 
the Wilson Packing Company, Chicago. He married Flor- 
ence Conrough, of Chicago, and they have two daughters, 
Virginia and Marion. 2. Charles R., a graduate of Ross- 
ville High School, engaged in business in Rossville. He 
married Bernice Hagen, of Chrisman, Illinois, a graduate 
nurse. They live at Rossville with Mrs. Prather. 3. J. Ross, 
who is engaged in business with his brother at Rossville. 
He married Alta Cooper, of Hoopeston, Illinois, and they 
have two children; Brownie, a graduate of Rossville High 
School in 1929; and John Douglass, attends school at Ross- 
ville. 4. Beulah, a graduate of Rossville High School and 
Illinois State Normal School, Bloomington, Illinois. She is 
engaged in secretarial work in Chicago. 

Mr. Prather was a Democrat, a member of the Church 
of Christ and belonged to the Masonic Lodge. He was a 
prominent citizen of the community and was widely known 
throughout Vermilion County. 



977 36 5 S RS,TY0F,LL,N0,SURMNA 
H^ro^RM.UONCoSTL.NO.ST 




3 0112 025395523 






■■ 



1 i